Convincing Parents (The Eternal Struggle) - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 05:38 AM Thread Starter
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Convincing Parents (The Eternal Struggle)

Hi guys,
So, as always, there's someone needing advice on how to convince their parents to let them get a horse, and that person is me. Yes, I can hear the collective sigh from you all.

They have hinted many times, that as soon as I get my restricted license, which means I am able to drive a car on my own without a supervisor, allowing me to drive to/from any grazing without my parents having to take part.
I have prepared a 'report' to present to my parents, and I tried my best to include as much as I could about the logistics and price of owning a horse.

This report can be found here.

As background - I have been riding for around 9 years, and participated in around 4 years of lessons, and also been on horse camps most holidays for the last 4 years. I'm a confident rider, having competed on borrowed horses up to 80cm (this was well over two years ago, and I have improved a lot since then) and I have made the most of any opportunity to work with horses - I have previously volunteered at the Riding for the Disabled where I live, and did so for 5 years until driving me an hour out to it and back every week became too much for my parents so I was not able to do so any more. I ride my friends horses and have exercised racehorses for peanuts (only did this for a few weeks, as again, my parents didn't like getting up early to take me to the racecourse before school).
All this being said, I think it's fair to say that I live in a fairly unsupportive family, horse wise - they're great every other way.

I am a straight excellence (A in America I guess) and am involved in many activities through school such as robotics, drama and sport. I am sure these will not get in the way of the horse, as I mainly participate in them in school time.

As I am paying for everything to do with the horse, my budget for the initial horse will be very low at $1,200 inc gear, so I will most likely buy an OTTB or something similarly green.

In the report, 'Ayla' is mentioned, who is a friend who has two horses already and has plenty of land I can keep my horse on for $5 a week (basically nothing).

I have done as much as I could think of in the report, but would like to, with the help of you guys, make this even better, so that my parents just can't say no to it, when it is presented. Have you guys got any ideas about what I can add to make it better - have I missed anything, are there any more points that would make it just that little bit better?

Thanks so much!
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post #2 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 06:01 AM Thread Starter
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Oops - for clarification where I said "they have hinted many times" then continued to state what the restricted license is, I meant they have hinted that I will be able to own a horse.
The drive to the RDA was half an hour, not a whole hour!

I'm not sure how to edit posts (evidently).
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post #3 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 07:23 AM
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I wrote a long reply and then lost it when my internet decided to spasm.

Anyway the long and short of it is that in my opinion you are underestimating costs and not leaving enough of a margin. Your plan is based on what ifs and good luck.

I get your plan, I've spent years as a broke uni student doing it as cheap as possible so I really get where you are coming from. But things aren't predictable with horses. The best case scenario doesn't often happen.

Your budget for purchasing tack and horse is too low. Even untrained, no breed ypungesters who are halfway decent usually go for more than that. Which leaves you with OTT horses. The cheapest horse for me to ever maintain has been the one I have now, and he was the most expensive to buy.

I've bought horses for $300, $800, $1000 and even a free one and they were all more in upkeep than the one I have now, and these were OTTBs, a standard bred, a Quarab and an Anglo all who seemed without issue at purchase.

If you want to convince your parents show that you are a good investment. The first part of this is showing you have a plan for everything. So run the best case scenario you have now, but have others too. Find out the costs of two other agistment in the area. Factor in another two different feeds in case your preference doesn't work out. Write out a scenario with these options. Include things like dental care and saddle fitting in your costs.

Show you have a vet fund, have access to 1000 if possible. Write put what's going to happen if you have to spend more to find a saddle that fits, or if your horse needs corrective shoeing.

The second part is to prove it now. Put away the money needed each week and prove at the end you've managed to save it all, keep it as a few months leeway in case you get sick and cant work.

I really wish you the best of luck, but don't try to just get by. You seem really dedicated and you're thinking it through but be realistic and plan for all outcomes. Even the best intentions and choices can lead to very expensive outcomes. Horses are always risky.
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post #4 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 07:31 AM
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Sounds like you have plenty of experience and covered everything :) also having a restricted is a great little card to play in convincing them. Are you from NZ by any chance? Just wondering because of the excellence in school thing.

I will say though: Getting your own horse is very different from riding people's other horses or riding lesson horses/ at quine operations. I think i'd be confident in saying that you want your first owned horse/pony to be a very positive experience because if i'm right in thinking you are not going to have the money to pay for training or lessons if you should need help with an ottb or green horse. Secondly horse tack can be really expensive so say you want to spend $500 on tack all up. That leaves little money to put into a horse. Are you working? If your parents are not supportive in that way like you've stated do you have emergency funds for vetting and general additional costs. Have you considered saving up for a longer period of time and buying something that is more established so you can set yourself up for success? Do you intend to show?

Just a few things to consider and best of luck to you!!
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post #5 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 08:16 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia View Post
Your budget for purchasing tack and horse is too low. Even untrained, no breed ypungesters who are halfway decent usually go for more than that. Which leaves you with OTT horses.

Show you have a vet fund, have access to 1000 if possible. Write put what's going to happen if you have to spend more to find a saddle that fits, or if your horse needs corrective shoeing.
I have many friends with OTT Standardbreds or TB's that have been bought for $300, green broke - it may just be New Zealand, I'm not sure, but most standardbreds seem to be relatively good doers (TB's on the other hand, not so much...).

By the time I am able to buy a horse, I will have around $3000 sitting in a bank account just for a horse, this will be able to be spread over buying it if I want to go out of budget, and tack, if again, I go out of budget. I definitely won't compromise money for a horse I won't be able to ride and will cost me a fortune!

Thanks for your reply - I'll definitely look over what you've said and make some changes :)
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post #6 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 08:18 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoftyCastle View Post
Are you from NZ by any chance? Just wondering because of the excellence in school thing.

Are you working? If your parents are not supportive in that way like you've stated do you have emergency funds for vetting and general additional costs. Have you considered saving up for a longer period of time and buying something that is more established so you can set yourself up for success? Do you intend to show?
I am from NZ! I live in Tauranga (and I'm freaking out about NCEA Results...).

I'm working, but it's minimum wage so not too much... I would probably low level show but that's it. I'll definitely take that all into consideration, thankyou! :)
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post #7 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 08:27 AM
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Ahh that's cool! STB's are generally pretty chilled and easy keepers compared with tbs but you do tend to put more training into them if they are pacers for example. I highly recommend stationbreds now that you've said you're in NZ. They can do anything and are very popular in the showing circuit and are cheaper than your show horses. They also need no real extra feeding :) Can you friend help you out with green horses aswell?
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post #8 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 08:31 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by LoftyCastle View Post
Ahh that's cool! STB's are generally pretty chilled and easy keepers compared with tbs but you do tend to put more training into them if they are pacers for example. I highly recommend stationbreds now that you've said you're in NZ. They can do anything and are very popular in the showing circuit and are cheaper than your show horses. They also need no real extra feeding :) Can you friend help you out with green horses aswell?
Stationbreds are definitely cool, but for some reason everyone wants them here, so they don't go for as cheap as Standardbreds or TBs - or at least, where I've seen them advertised. My friend is definitely able to help me out!
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post #9 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 08:37 AM
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Well done on your research.

Unless you have very good grazing a horse will get through more than a normal sized bale of hay a week in the winter

I agree the buying horse and tack is to low. Yes, you can pick up cheap horses and tack buy cheap tack is not usually any good and at times unsafe.

An OTTB would need transitioning to going barefoot and this can take over a year. Not a lot of TBs have the best of feet.

You mention about a car and leaving it at the stables - is there a spare car in the family or are you going to have to buy one? If so there will be running costs for that.

The other thingy is insurance, you should have a third party cover so if the horse escapes and does damage you are covered.

Whatever the figure you come up with you can bet it will cost more!
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post #10 of 22 Old 01-09-2015, 08:47 AM
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A Standardbred will generally have a cheaper upkeep than a TB in my experience. Still I would not reccomend either (fresh off the track) as a first horse. Some standies can be pretty decent though.
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