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post #11 of 20 Old 09-03-2014, 06:00 PM
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The laminitis in one foot would have put more strain on the opposite leg/shoulder as she would place more weight on it - which could account for the shoulder lameness you're now seeing.
Can you see more pronounced shoulder muscle in one side?
If so that could also affect saddle fit
Not sure what your chiro is doing but I would use massage therapy for something like this
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post #12 of 20 Old 09-03-2014, 06:59 PM Thread Starter
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Jaydee, I really can't tell a difference in muscle from one side to the next. The shoulder has been problematic since before the laminitis, but maybe that aggravated the problem (?) Massage is a good suggestion. I will look in to it :)
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post #13 of 20 Old 09-03-2014, 07:38 PM
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Why do you ask why someone would give a Paso Fino to a new rider? I'm no expert, but the Paso Finos (and Peruvian Pasos) that I have known have been terrific horses - very smart, playful and more people oriented than horses are generally.

I think you're smart to do a lot of ground work with her at first, even without her health issues. There is a lot more than just lunging - teaching her to pay attention to you as you lead her - will she tune in to your movements enough to turn without a signal, stop when you stop, match your pace? Does she know how to yield her hindquarters? There are the Parrelli 7 games, Anderson's lunging for respect, etc.

There's also some good books on stretches you can do with her that might keep her "in" better once she's been adjusted. I'm sure your chiro can give you some as well.

BTW, once you feel like you are ready for it, bareback is an excellent training tool for developing your seat. If it makes you nervous, you can do it at first with someone else leading her for you, but it sounds like she's probably a good horse to try it with. It also takes the saddle out of the equation.

Last edited by Pagancat; 09-03-2014 at 07:40 PM. Reason: Addition
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post #14 of 20 Old 09-03-2014, 08:48 PM
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A gaited horse needs a longer lunge line because of their lateral movement. Pasos do move in what appears to be a choppy manner to the on-looker yet can be incredibly smooth to ride. I'd like to see a video in which you've asked her to move out and not at the dog walk. A layman's test for hoof soreness is to lead the horse then ask for a tight turn. A sound horse will step one foot in front of the other. A sore one will shuffle or hop. Shoulder injuries are rare so my first concern would be the hoof. Try her bareback and see if that helps. If a rider isn't balanced side to side the saddle will dig into the shoulder blade. If the unbalanced rider is right handed, then it is the horse's left shoulder blade that may hurt.



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post #15 of 20 Old 09-03-2014, 09:46 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Pagancat View Post
Why do you ask why someone would give a Paso Fino to a new rider? I'm no expert, but the Paso Finos (and Peruvian Pasos) that I have known have been terrific horses - very smart, playful and more people oriented than horses are generally.

I think you're smart to do a lot of ground work with her at first, even without her health issues. There is a lot more than just lunging - teaching her to pay attention to you as you lead her - will she tune in to your movements enough to turn without a signal, stop when you stop, match your pace? Does she know how to yield her hindquarters? There are the Parrelli 7 games, Anderson's lunging for respect, etc.
It's been drilled in to my head that Pasos are hot horses and their movement is intimidating, I guess that's why I joke about giving one to a beginner. I've gone to several fun shows and I've met some dead head horses that some days I'd give my right arm for just so I could ride. But, you are right about the personality. She is a terrific horse. Very intelligent and sweet as can be. Though I get frustrated at times, I wouldn't trade her for anything. I've decided that I can't let my 'mentors' commentaries affect how I proceed with this horse. In general I am a person with common sense and I don't want any broken bones anymore than the next guy, so I'll proceed with caution, respect, hope and faith.

I've owned her since 3/19/13 and my first time on her was 6/21/14. I have done tons of groundwork and will continue to do so. I wish you all could see her up close then and now. She was near a basket case with little to no trust of humans when I took ownership. She wouldn't let you anywhere near her ears and was an absolute jumble of nerves always. She does tune in to my movements, matches my pace and yields her hindquarters. She will even follow me sideways copying my leg movement crossing over in tune with me.

She has had an abundant amount of training, but somewhere a long the way, someone/something gave her a bad memory. Maybe in the trailer on the way from Kentucky to Wisconsin (?). We'll never know. We own Clinton Anderson's Fundamentals series, I've learned a ton from those and I still learn things every day just reading HF :) The chiro gave me some exercises to do mainly for her neck which was once a huge problem. I will definitely ask his advice for addressing the shoulder and stretches for that.
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post #16 of 20 Old 09-03-2014, 09:56 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
A gaited horse needs a longer lunge line because of their lateral movement. Pasos do move in what appears to be a choppy manner to the on-looker yet can be incredibly smooth to ride. I'd like to see a video in which you've asked her to move out and not at the dog walk. A layman's test for hoof soreness is to lead the horse then ask for a tight turn. A sound horse will step one foot in front of the other. A sore one will shuffle or hop. Shoulder injuries are rare so my first concern would be the hoof. Try her bareback and see if that helps. If a rider isn't balanced side to side the saddle will dig into the shoulder blade. If the unbalanced rider is right handed, then it is the horse's left shoulder blade that may hurt.
We are using a longer lunge line currently. I will take video once these rainy days are behind us. She will step one foot in front of the other, or at least she has, I can't honestly say I've paid too much attention to that recently, but that is why I love HF! Without HF I wouldn't know what to look for. Funny thing is, she's very timid and respectful with humans, but she is lead mare with the horses. We think her neck problem was exacerbated by striking the stall next to her when that horse would eye up her hay or otherwise annoy her. She has now been moved to the lone stall across the aisle from the others and voila!! No more neck problems after adjustments...

I will work up to riding her bareback soon. My only concern with that is I don't think she's ever been ridden bareback and she is VERY sensitive to contact, so I fear my legs right on her might freak her out a bit. I am right handed though... so definitely worth looking in to! I'm also planning to try riding her in my MIL's English saddle, though my tereque is lighter (17# only) the English may be less encroaching on the shoulder area(s).
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post #17 of 20 Old 09-05-2014, 01:16 PM
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She may have foundered in her right front (foundering on one foot is rare, abscess in one foot is not) because she was favoring her left front and so putting much more weight on her right. If she abscessed in her left front (or bowed a tendon or wrenched anything else) so she was 3 legged lame for any amount of time, her opposite front foot would founder.
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post #18 of 20 Old 09-05-2014, 02:13 PM
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Lets not scare this gal. If you try bareback, leg your legs hang relaxed. Balance with your upper body, don't grip with your legs. She's like a tube of toothpaste, squeeze and she may scoot forward. Don't lean forward but keep your upper body straight but relaxed. You may even roll your hips back a little if more comfortable so you lower back has to be loose. If not confident have someone hook on a lead rope and walk with you.



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post #19 of 20 Old 09-05-2014, 03:42 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Elana View Post
She may have foundered in her right front (foundering on one foot is rare, abscess in one foot is not) because she was favoring her left front and so putting much more weight on her right. If she abscessed in her left front (or bowed a tendon or wrenched anything else) so she was 3 legged lame for any amount of time, her opposite front foot would founder.
No, she didn't founder. She had "mild laminitis" on the right front hoof. That was at the beginning of July. She had no signs of founder. The shoulder was at issue before the laminitis. The laminitis symptoms disappeared by 7/20 and the farrier told us firmly to get her pampered butt back outside. Lol. The farrier was out the week prior to cut back or down (forgive me if I have the incorrect term) both front feet.

She's got a distinctive saunter with the shoulder issue. It's finally not raining, so maybe I'll get her out today for some requested video

I'll take the old guy out for a bareback refresher excursion then give it go on her. Thanks for the ideas, support, feedback everyone!
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post #20 of 20 Old 09-06-2014, 09:04 AM Thread Starter
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Well All, I am very discouraged. My horse was out all day yesterday in the round pen after two days of stall because of storms. When I brought her in to feed, she seemed a bit sore... When I took her out to work with her it was obvious she was very sore. Both front feet are mildly warm and she's very, very sore. I put her promptly back in the stall with poultice on the feet and a dose of bute. I don't know fifth is is a new development, or what. But I pick her feet every time I take her out to groom and always before working and the feet have not been warm before this. Could she have been stomping because the gnats were bad and done this ... Could she have eaten too much fresh grass (low possibility since there is not much in there), or is it possible those 4 days of light work and riding did this. Very, very discouraged :(. She'll remain in the stall today with more but and poultice tx and for who knows how long. We just can't catch a break <\3
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