A couple questions - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 12:27 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by greentree View Post
It may help if you talk to her like a normal human...but do not chatter to her incessantly. Speak to her to greet her, give her commands, and maybe praise.....that way she learns to listen for your command. She cannot be expected to discern that out of chatter. (Not saying that you chatter, but if you do...)
What do you mean talk to her like a normal human? Do you mean talk more with her?

I do talk a fair amount with her, but its not a lot of content, most is just repeated stuff "good girl, etc" When I greet her, I always say hi, then her name....hi again when im closer to her and ask how she is, or what shes been doing. Good girl when i praise her for coming up to me to catch her.
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post #32 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 12:31 AM
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Rearing is not so black and white. It's everything paired with the events leading up to rearing and what the horse is doing whilst rearing.

It's not rearing = (insert emotion/action here) kind of like why does a horse buck or why does a horse balk...

Learn to read their body language and then you can understand WHY they are doing things, and then you know how to work with them on getting them to quit that behavior.
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post #33 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 01:51 AM
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Not talk to her more. Don't use a baby voice or a "soothing" voice. Talk to her like you talk to your trainer or your neighbor. Normal tone of voice. When I talk to my gelding, it's like I'm talking to my son. I got used to talking to animals like this because I have a dog who HATES baby talk. He tried to bite my sister when she baby-talked at him.

Your horse doesn't need constant soothing. She needs someone who will step up and be the leader, otherwise she will be (she seems like she has that mentality).
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post #34 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 04:01 AM
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Your horse rears because she has learned that it is a way out of pressure.

You can NOT let rearing be a way out. If she is really rearing, this is a dangerous issue, that you are not qualified to handle.
If she's just popping up a little with her front end, you'd better make sure you put a stop to it, before it turns into a bigger deal.
What exactly is going on when she rears? Are you pulling on the lead rope or making any sort of contact with the halter?

If it were me, when she rears, I would immediately get after her HARD by sending her forward around me, lunging her, as fast as I could get her to go, and quite frankly, probably being pretty harsh with the whip or end of the lead rope on her rump. You have to make it clear to her that her trying to go up is absolutely NOT the way out of work, that rearing actually means she's going to have to do more work. And I don't mean lazy trotting around you lunging, that is not work, I mean making her move her feet FAST.
I suspect that her rearing intimidates you and makes you back off, even if just for a second. You're going to have to get into her hard for it, in order to make sure she understands that rearing is not an option for finding release.

You should probably be asking your trainer for help with that immediately, as we cannot really know what's going on without being there or at least seeing a video of what's going on.

ETA - we humans, aren't really as good at multi-tasking as we'd like to think we are. Often, we struggle to truly pay attention to more than one thing at a time. Make sure when you are giving a correction with you whip or the end of you're lead rope you aren't inadvertantly applying pressure to the leadrope/halter.
I have a really hard time when opening and closing gates, keeping my hand on the reins still, while my other hand is opening the gate. I always catch my rein hand raising up or inadvertantly applying pressure to the bit, when my horse is standing or moving exactly how I want them, which is sending them mixed signals.
It's something we all have to pay attention to

Last edited by enh817; 10-13-2015 at 04:08 AM.
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post #35 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 09:03 AM
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Drafty aires mom said it....I said it....the horse knows what you are FEELiNG!! You do NOT have to SAY one word.

An example:
When I am hitching my horses to the carriage, they have to line up in front of it. (The shafts raise up and sit on the rail of the carriage, they don't lay on the ground.) my horse is wearing blinkers, so if I am at their shoulder, they cannot see me. I hold the rein, bring them close, and move towards their side. I DO NOT have to say anything. They line up perfectly straight, and I pull the shafts down.
I TOLD them to go there, but said NO words.

It is not magic, it is the way most prey animals work.

How long can you stare at a deer, wild turkey, etc., before they bolt? They FEEL you looking at them.

I also do not do any "natural horsemanship" type stuff with my horses. I have studied the concept, but did not find it extremely useful, but I was already 40 when I first became aware of Pat Parelli, and had been training horses for 30 years.

To do those NH exercises takes FEEL...or else you are sensitizing when you should be desensitizing, and vice-versa, and confusing the horse more.
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post #36 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 09:33 AM
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you're getting lots of advice- all good. But here's the key: Teach Yourself! Experiment with your horse. That bond between the two of you is unique. Look him dead in the eye and see what happens. How do you feel? How did your horse react? Look away, give him a soft look, stand up straight facing him, stand sideways, etc. You see where I'm going? You will learn best by trying a variety of things and seeing what fits your personality and what fits your horse's personality. What works with this horse won't necessarily work with another horse. That's why there are so many opinions out there. You won't mess up your horse, you won't do irreparable damage. Just get out there and do it!
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post #37 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 10:14 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
Rearing is not so black and white. It's everything paired with the events leading up to rearing and what the horse is doing whilst rearing.

It's not rearing = (insert emotion/action here) kind of like why does a horse buck or why does a horse balk...

Learn to read their body language and then you can understand WHY they are doing things, and then you know how to work with them on getting them to quit that behavior.
Oh ok and this is why Im looking for a good book on horse body language.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum View Post
Not talk to her more. Don't use a baby voice or a "soothing" voice. Talk to her like you talk to your trainer or your neighbor. Normal tone of voice. When I talk to my gelding, it's like I'm talking to my son. I got used to talking to animals like this because I have a dog who HATES baby talk. He tried to bite my sister when she baby-talked at him.

Your horse doesn't need constant soothing. She needs someone who will step up and be the leader, otherwise she will be (she seems like she has that mentality).
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Dont use a soft baby voice on her ever? What if im not working with her and just walking? What if i taught her something and she did well?

I thought normal generic talk comes across as you have no emotion, therefore the horse will take it as just that.
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post #38 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 10:26 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by enh817 View Post
Your horse rears because she has learned that it is a way out of pressure.

You can NOT let rearing be a way out. If she is really rearing, this is a dangerous issue, that you are not qualified to handle.
If she's just popping up a little with her front end, you'd better make sure you put a stop to it, before it turns into a bigger deal.
What exactly is going on when she rears? Are you pulling on the lead rope or making any sort of contact with the halter?
Im not giving any pressure on the lead when she does it. She used to do it when I would lunge her one direction then switch to the other, but she doesnt anymore.

Quote:
If it were me, when she rears, I would immediately get after her HARD by sending her forward around me, lunging her, as fast as I could get her to go, and quite frankly, probably being pretty harsh with the whip or end of the lead rope on her rump. You have to make it clear to her that her trying to go up is absolutely NOT the way out of work, that rearing actually means she's going to have to do more work.
Ok ill do this, gaurenteed. Ive had lunging her aftewards in mind for some time but I was worried that if her rearing was a result of me not giving clear directions, then its not her fault but mine and if i punish her for it, that would not be sending the right message.

Quote:
I suspect that her rearing intimidates you and makes you back off, even if just for a second. You're going to have to get into her hard for it, in order to make sure she understands that rearing is not an option for finding release.
It did at first but it more so confuses me. I thought at first it was me and my fault by not giving clear ques.


Quote:
Make sure when you are giving a correction with you whip or the end of you're lead rope you aren't inadvertantly applying pressure to the leadrope/halter.
i always try my best not to and always leave enough slack in the lead.
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post #39 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 10:30 AM Thread Starter
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When you guys said to give her a sharp tap on the chest with the end of the whip or on her front legs with the end of the lead. How many? Just once? Or keep doing it until she moves back?
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post #40 of 1323 Old 10-13-2015, 01:16 PM
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When she does well, give her an enthusiastic "Good girl!" Just like if you were praising a dog who had performed well. Horses don't read emotion in your voice. They read body language. The voice is for US because WE are vocal beings who put more stock in voice tone than in body language. If you are baby talking to her or using a soft voice, I can guarantee that your body language is matching that and that's why you continue to have problems.

As for how many times to tap...I only tap once. But, I make that tap count with enough sting behind it to get my point across clearly. It's the difference between a firm "No!" and saying "No, no, no, no" repeatedly in a soft or less firm voice. Which one are you going to pay attention to?
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