A couple questions - Page 55 - The Horse Forum
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post #541 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 09:48 PM
Green Broke
 
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It's quite normal for there to be bite marks and kick marks when horses are in a herd especially if that member is new.

They will move on and get settled. I think I mentioned it before...
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post #542 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 09:57 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahfromsc View Post
Dang auto correct. I apologize for spelling and other errors in the previous post!

The gelding is just telling your mare he is the big kahuna and putting her in her place by chasing her away from his herd. He will allow her 'in' when he feels she is respecting his place. Sounds as if she is listening to him.

Watch this gelding and how he handles his herd. A human can learn a lot by watching.
Ive been spending a lot of time over the past 4-5 days (since my mare was put in the area next to the herd full time) watching how the herd communicates. Its rather fascinating, ive learned a lot so far.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahfromsc View Post
Only if you can keep your horse at a steady pace.

What do you mean by in sync?
From what a trainer from the past told me, it gets the horse and the owner thinking on the same page and builds trust and bonds them.
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post #543 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 10:23 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
Your mare will be fine. She may get a few scuffs, bites and kick marks while she finds her place in the herd, but she'll ultimately find her position in the pecking order.
Bites, scrapes, cuts on my mare just bother me because it takes such a long time for the hair to grow back. Some people are just so superficial. When my mare had a bunch of cuts on the left side of her face at the old barn 3 months ago, even though they were just surface cuts, they looked really bad. I had a boarder who would come up to me all the time as she sees me cold rinsing them, and she would go "oh no, her poor face!!!!" And I would always say, you know that? yes it doesnt look good but they will heal, its only temporary and I still love her.

[/QUOTE]The gelding bit her on the butt because she was being disrespectful. [/quote]

This is why I really wish I decided to go visit her yesterday. Of all days, this wasnt the day to miss. Remember me saying I would do anything for this moment? Well I didnt expect her to be put out in the herd as soon as yesterday. I was going to go see her but I decided I really needed to spend the time to read my books.

Quote:
Yes, carry your carrot stick with you, you can whip the air with that savvy string and hit the ground and make a very impressive sounding pop with it. If you use it right, you shouldn't need to touch anyone with it. Now when that gelding and your mare went butt to butt and started flinging heels around, I'd have cracked him on his butt and run him off and I've have corrected your mare. They may throw kicks at each other, but not with you in the pasture. They need to learn to recognize you (or any other human) as the #1 as soon as you go in the pasture. I think I told you that I remind mine, "NOT with ME in the pasture! I AM THE ALPHA!" and I am swinging buckets, ropes, carrot stick, whatever I have if needed. They aren't allowed to make nasty faces, pin ears or turn butts if I am present. None are allowed into my space unless I invite one or more in. I enforce that with my carrot stick. As for gate clearance, I would reach out and touch a couple and run the herd leader off the gate PDQ next time I was out. And I would send him 25 ft or more away, the rest will follow. Once you get his attention the others will look to him and see he gives respect and they will too.

Your mare will be allowed in to the herd in good time. It may not be YOUR time but when they're all ready to get along, she'll be allowed in.
Pretty sure what you mean by whipping the carrot stick in the air is like a helicopter right?

Its too bad I had the carrot stick ready as I was walking back but left it in the barn last min. If I had it, I would have used it when they kicked out at each other.

I upload the video here, its cute seeing the horses lick the camera haha (they were so curious on what it was) No its not ruinned, I have a full body casing on it and they can lick and chew and it wont get wrecked.

But here you can see me walking to my mare and the philly and chestnut (and even the buckskin was too) were thinking about following me all the way to her, but they thought twice about it and when I said woah and stand they listened.

Before this, I had a carrot in my pocket for my mare and when I was in the paddock they tried getting too close to sniff it and I chased them out of my space. The philly (dark bay) was relentless but after the 3rd time where I really got after her she finally listened.

I will carry my carrot stick with me everytime for the next while, until i feel i dont need it. But its a good tool to have.

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post #544 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 10:27 PM
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Hoofpic, this is exactly what your mare needs! Someone (the other herd members) to put her in her place and remind her that she is not top dog. I suspect that after she's been in the herd for a bit and has been knocked down a few pegs, she won't be quite as eager to challenge you. Of course, you still have to do you job, but it generally does a whole lot of good for horses with some attitude to get knocked around a bit in a herd.
It's the reason why so many of us advocate putting young colts/fillies out with older, crabby, don't-take-no-crap mares or geldings while they grow up, before they start training. We want them to get knocked around a bit if they step out of line, because other horses can do a much better job teaching respect than we humans can.
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post #545 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 10:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
Ive been spending a lot of time over the past 4-5 days (since my mare was put in the area next to the herd full time) watching how the herd communicates. Its rather fascinating, ive learned a lot so far.



From what a trainer from the past told me, it gets the horse and the owner thinking on the same page and builds trust and bonds them.
I disagree. Mainly because many people do not use the time lunging a horse correctly. Basically, they do not do it correctly.
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post #546 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 10:39 PM
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That video is hilarious! I love the way they "fixed" it for you!
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post #547 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 10:49 PM Thread Starter
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Can I say one thing and its a big one.

I now walk with my head up looking forward, shoulders up and chest straight everywhere, all the time, no matter where I am. At work, at home, even if im just getting up to take 3 or 4 steps, it doesnt matter. It has become natural to me now and has carried over nicely to the barn. Every time I see my mare, the first thing that comes to my mind is the quote I took and remember from the book "How to think like a horse" from Cherry Hill

"Horses read you the moment they see you."

So now everytime I have her see me, I am already in my new and much improved walk.

Im still baffled that not a single one of my past trainers brought this up with me and suggested I walk better.
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post #548 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 11:02 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by enh817 View Post
Hoofpic, this is exactly what your mare needs! Someone (the other herd members) to put her in her place and remind her that she is not top dog. I suspect that after she's been in the herd for a bit and has been knocked down a few pegs, she won't be quite as eager to challenge you. Of course, you still have to do you job, but it generally does a whole lot of good for horses with some attitude to get knocked around a bit in a herd.
It's the reason why so many of us advocate putting young colts/fillies out with older, crabby, don't-take-no-crap mares or geldings while they grow up, before they start training. We want them to get knocked around a bit if they step out of line, because other horses can do a much better job teaching respect than we humans can.
This is exactly what my trainer and BO said as well a couple weeks ago if not longer. The sooner she is out in a herd the better for both her and I. Her having a boss in her herd 24/7 will keep her in order and set her straight when she needs to be.

Also trainer brought up a good point in that when a horse isnt in a herd, their owner are their herd. And because you dont interact with them 24/7 because you arent with them all the time, its not the same as them having other horses with them to communicate with 24/7.

Will I see an improvement or change in her atittude? Possibly. It could be significant, it could be very little, or it could be none. But I do believe I will see an adjustment in her.

horses just tend to be happier when theyre able to be a horse.

But because she has been isolated for the past 6 weeks at the new barn and never been in a herd at the old barn, she hasnt been able to be a horse, run, play, bond with other horses for the 4.5 months Ive had her and add another 2 months prior when the previous owner had her all alone in her backyard. So that is 6.5 months of her being isolated and not able to be a horse, not able to get some really close friends.

She was really lonely during those two months when she was alone in the previous owners backyard. When she moved to the old barn she was so happy and excited just to see other horses around her again and to have them around her. Some horses just dont do well at all alone, and she was a prime example. Those 2 months, I couldnt imagine what it was like for her.

But as time went on, the loneliness feeling has creeped back in (unintentionally of course) as I just know she wanted to at least have a buddy in her paddock. SOmeone to keep her company, run with etc. Having other horses over the fence just isnt the same thing. The sad thing is that summer is over and she wont be able to enjoy the summer grass with other horses, but she sure will be next spring and all of next summer.

I do believe she will be happy because theres no doubt that shes been wanting this for so long and wondering why she hasnt been allowed to run and play and be with other horses. This has been eating me up inside for the past 3 months. I wanted nothing more for her than this.

Last edited by Hoofpic; 11-01-2015 at 11:09 PM.
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post #549 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 11:20 PM
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In sync is a term I use. I'll throw out some words here to describe what it means to me.
Hello, how are you today. I'm ok too, let's see if we are going to do something together.

Not just at the same time. Not just because I'm telling you, but also because you want to do so.

Let me see how you are feeling and moving:
Not so great? Let me see if I can help.
A little frisky? Settle down it's time to learn and work.
There that's better.
Short warm up to find the mood, and get on the same page. Also to comfortably get the saddle seated in proper position and tightened comfortably.

In Sync is also a name Terry Myers uses in his training program.

In ridden work I feel we all want to move with our horse, in other words synchronized we become closer to moving as one.


Last edited by anndankev; 11-01-2015 at 11:25 PM. Reason: preposition
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post #550 of 1323 Old 11-01-2015, 11:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by greentree View Post
They are horses, and as I said before, the BO was doing YOU a huge favor by keeping your mare by herself. Not to mention himself. Because if you are going to fret about everything, you may find yourself asked to find a new barn. The man has enough to worry about.
Yes he most definitely was and I knew it. I always had (and still do) have full trust in him and his judgement in where he feels horses would fit the best. hes been doing this for many many years. I trust him because he treats every horse on his property as if they were his own. He has so much love for the industry and what he does, that (like me) what stems him to do what he does so well is his passion for horses. What Ive experienced myself first hand is that its incredible how far you can go and how well you can do something when passion drives you. I have been running off this feeling for the past 5-6 months if not longer and still am.

Original quarentine period was 3 weeks. I was fully confident she would be in a herd in 3 weeks from when I brought her in. He delayed to up to 6 weeks because he felt she wasnt ready. Many things were factors - her age, her personality but also me being a novice and him knowing that Ive only had her for 4.5 months.

I really do appreciate his efforts in the way hes gone about putting her out. By slowly putting her next to the herd area for a day on every second day, then move it up to everyday but daytimes only, then everyday day and night. Then now, in the herd daytimes only but in the area right next to the herd for the night.

The man obviously has his standards when it comes to placing horse and that is a breath of fresh air to see especially when compared to the old barn where new boarders could (and would all the time) throw their new horses into any field and herd the day they move there. The BO doesnt learn the personalities of any of the horses becuase he doesnt care and when the time comes for them having to move a troubled horse to another field, they wont know what is the best route to take. And what do you know, this is all from a lack of care and passion for what they do. All they cared about was the cheques in the mailbox, whereas the BO now is the complete opposite.

Again, moving to this new barn was the single best decision ive ever made for my mare and I.
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Last edited by Hoofpic; 11-01-2015 at 11:37 PM.
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