Does horse riding have to be dangerous? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 50 Old 03-07-2017, 06:16 PM
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You are most likely to get hurt if you deal with several horses, herds, and reactive horses - especially riding-wise.

To minimize risk of getting hurt; pick a willing, calm schoolmaster type of horse, and always wear a helmet.

I have been stamped on several times, run over couple of times, double barreled, fallen on my head, fallen with a horse and had my leg smashed between.

The last one has been the worst physically, my knee is still recovering after two months. Could have been worse as I haven't broken any bones yet. Have taken more risks than got hurt, that's for sure. It's mostly up to our choices and then freak accidents just happen.
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post #22 of 50 Old 03-07-2017, 06:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsef View Post
It it very unlikely to be killed on the ground, especially if you stick to well trained, calm horses. However, you have to keep your wits around large animals all the time as accidents can happen even with calmest of them. There was an accident last year in which a women was killed by a cow kick. Mind you, those are really, really rare. More often there are broken toes and similar injuries, but even those are quite rare. I've often seen people with broken limbs from falling off, but only one instance where a person broke something when handling a horse.

I just remembered that there are computerized mechanical horses, if you wish to start off on a very, very safe note.
All of this.

If you haven't already realized it OP, horses require your full attention 100% of the time. You cannot ever forget of the damage they can do. This doesn't mean you have to be tense, or stressed around them 100% of the time. Quite the opposite (they feed off your anxiety so that would just make it worse). But it does mean that you have to be PRESENT at all times. This is actually what I, and a lot of people, like about being with horses and riding them. You have to be in the moment, fully tuned in to what they are feeling, thinking, and you have to respect it. If you want to be safe and if you want your horse's full cooperation, you have to be totally focused on them. It's a type of energy you give off and receive from them, and when the connection is there, it is truly magical.

Whether I'm in the barn doing chores, grooming my horses, riding on a trail or focusing hard on more complicated maneuvers, I have to be tuned into my horse to have an idea (an inkling really, because it can all change in an instant) of what they will do next. That, to me, is the most gratifying feeling in the world and the best kind of therapy. I can't think about work, my kids, or anything other than my horse. That is a great gift in my view.
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post #23 of 50 Old 03-07-2017, 10:39 PM
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I have been kicked, stomped, bitten, had a galloping horse knock me down, I have fallen off of galloping horses, and had horses fall out from under me. I have never had a serious injury. I broke a couple of fingers and my tail bone. (Not all at once.)

Most of the time that I have been hurt, it has been when going out into a pasture full of horses. I always carry a whip when I go into a group so I don't get stomped.

Yes you can get hurt. But you probably won't.

Celeste
Carpe Diem!
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post #24 of 50 Old 03-07-2017, 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
All of this.

If you haven't already realized it OP, horses require your full attention 100% of the time. You cannot ever forget of the damage they can do. This doesn't mean you have to be tense, or stressed around them 100% of the time. Quite the opposite (they feed off your anxiety so that would just make it worse). But it does mean that you have to be PRESENT at all times. This is actually what I, and a lot of people, like about being with horses and riding them. You have to be in the moment, fully tuned in to what they are feeling, thinking, and you have to respect it. If you want to be safe and if you want your horse's full cooperation, you have to be totally focused on them. It's a type of energy you give off and receive from them, and when the connection is there, it is truly magical.

Whether I'm in the barn doing chores, grooming my horses, riding on a trail or focusing hard on more complicated maneuvers, I have to be tuned into my horse to have an idea (an inkling really, because it can all change in an instant) of what they will do next. That, to me, is the most gratifying feeling in the world and the best kind of therapy. I can't think about work, my kids, or anything other than my horse. That is a great gift in my view.
Love this post.
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post #25 of 50 Old 03-08-2017, 12:48 AM
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Originally Posted by zolantal View Post
During what activities did those accidents happen? Falling off is one thing, but is it likely that you'll be killed when simply walking a horse, or grooming a horse?
The guy who was killed was training a colt, fell off and got stomped on the head. He had been a lifelong horseman and trainer (not lifelong for that but had been for a good number of years).

When I got the broken ribs I was trying to get my kid safe, good natured mare to come in off of pasture. I'd had this mare since she was a yearling and she'd never made a wrong move before, even when I started training her under saddle. Anyway, she didn't want to come in and kept trying to avert her head when I went out to get her so I flicked her with my finger on the tip of her ear so she'd pay attention. She spun around and double barreled me right in the chest. Thankfully I was in no shape to kill her and hubby refused so she lived about another 15 years and never again did anything out of the ordinary. I've gotten way more of my minor injuries when I've been on the ground versus on their back. And more often than not it's been when I've been trying to help someone else with their horse versus one of my own horses.

My best friend became paralyzed from the waist down when the horse she was on gave one half hearted buck (we think maybe a horsefly landed on his butt) and she fell off. We were just walking along the side of a road.

Really I don't tell you these things to scare you but for you to see the reality. I've been into horses my entire life and I'm in my mid fifties and have always been around a lot of other horse people and the tragic accidents have been few but on occasion they do happen. That has never dampened my enthusiasm for horses or riding because the joy far outweighs the risks in my mind. You have to decide whether horses will bring you enough happiness that you're willing to take whatever risk there is without dwelling on it or if the fear of getting hurt would be greater than the enjoyment. I've known way more people who've died from other types of accidents (mainly motorized vehicle accidents) than I've known who died from horse related accidents if that makes you feel any better.
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post #26 of 50 Old 03-08-2017, 02:26 AM
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Dealing with a 1,200 lb prey animal will always be dangerous, I'm sorry to say. You can do all that you can to prevent the worst from happening: helmets and good-mannered horses is a start (I say good-mannered horses because you're a beginner and because as a beginning rider I made the mistake of buying a green horse.)

You'll get hurt, you may break things, your horse may get hurt, he may break things, it is what it is. Just take life in stride. At least you've discovered the love of horses. :)
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post #27 of 50 Old 03-08-2017, 02:33 AM
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I think we've successfully scared OP off horses. OP will be taking up chess instead of riding :)

Mind you, I've seen more fist fights in chess than in in riding - my dad used to play with his buddies at the local park :)
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post #28 of 50 Old 03-08-2017, 04:44 AM
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Op, really, I wouldn't worry for it too much, but just be precautious. My workplace has 70+ horses plus colts, but I have been mostly hurt dealing with my own reactive mare. After you have taken some lessons, you will take to riding a nice, quiet horse and enjoy the trails. Be confident and present around horses, and you will be just fine. :)
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post #29 of 50 Old 03-08-2017, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsef View Post
I think we've successfully scared OP off horses. OP will be taking up chess instead of riding :)

Mind you, I've seen more fist fights in chess than in in riding - my dad used to play with his buddies at the local park :)
This made me giggle.

That said, there must be something we all love about riding if we keep going back to it after injuries, small injuries or large, we all seem to stay involved on some level with horses. :)
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post #30 of 50 Old 03-08-2017, 10:41 PM
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You just don't need to be around green, inexperienced, wild eyed horses if you are not at the level where you should be starting colts. Point blank, you shouldn't own or be handling those horses. The risk increases exponentially.

My younger Mare in training had a recent development. We discovered she bucks like a rodeo bronc when something touches her flanks. She has been in training for five months, sorted cattle, been ridden on trails, been sacked out, all the normal stuff. They were driving her and one of the ropes touched her BOOM spot. She bucked laps around the arena.

These are great horse trainers, and they know how to settle that out of a horse so it becomes a very unlikely thing in the future. I'm grateful for this little accident, it exposed a problem that needs to be addressed and reminded me that I don't know how to deal with something like that.

I do think there is a type of horse people who are attracted to "spirited" horses. They love lost causes, mean horses, horses that half kill anyone but a select few people. You have to average that kind of thing into the statistics. Heck, even President Regan is said to have preferred really hot horses. Not my thing personally.
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