Does this sound correct in terms of horse ownership? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 03:31 AM Thread Starter
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Does this sound correct in terms of horse ownership?

I posted a while ago about my parents not letting me own, lease or part lease a horse. However, my instructor has recently brought up the idea with my mother several times and I think I may have the slightest chance.

I've worked out all costs and details and have put them into a Powerpoint presentation. Do these figures sound correct to you? I will not be competing so those figures have not been added in. I have also overestimated the prices of items so there is room for forgotten supplies and the prices are based upon the higher costs in my area. Please let me know if there is anything I have missed!

Tack
Saddle + girth + stirrups (secondhand): $500
Bridle + reins + bit (secondhand): $60
Saddle pad: $50
Blanket/Rug (secondhand): $60
Halter: $35
Lead: $15
Fly mask: $20
Saddle soap/oil: $20
Leg wraps/polo wraps: $30
Lunge line: $20
Lunge whip: $20
TOTAL: $830

Grooming/Care
Curry comb: $5
Dandy brush: $12
Body brush: $12
Face brush: $15
Fly spray: $30
Hoof pick: $5
Mane comb: $5
Mane/tail brush: $5
Sweat scraper: $12
Shampoo/Conditioner: $20
Towel: $10
Thermometer: $15
Self-sticking bandage: $20
Wound cleaner: $40
Zinc cream: $30
Antiseptic cream: $20
Gauze/absorbants: $15
TOTAL: $271

Horse: $1500


TOTAL INITIAL COST: $2601


Ongoing Costs


Board: $25 /week (may be up to $75 a week, unsure)

Farrier: $150 /6 weeks
Dental: $150 /year
Worming: $20 /6 - 8 weeks
Vaccinations: $150 /year
Hay: $30 /week
Salt/Supplements: $25 /8 weeks

WEEKLY COSTS
Board: $25
Farrier: $25
Dental: $3
Worming: $3
Vaccinations: $3
Hay: $30
Salt/Supplements: $4
TOTAL WEEKLY COST: $93
TOTAL MONTHLY COST: $372
TOTAL ANNUAL COST: $4386
TOTAL COST FOR FIRST YEAR: $6987


I will also be in Year 11 this year. My bus leaves at 7:30 to arrive to school at 8:30 and school ends at 3:00 with me getting home at 4:00. The place where I hope to keep my horse (and where I currently take lessons) is half an hour away, however it is on the way to my school.



My proposed schedule is as follows:
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
Same schedule


Tuesday
6:30 Leave house with father on his way to work
7:00 Arrive at stables
8:00 Leave stables (my father would be dealing with emails and other bits of work during this time)
8:30 Arrive at school



Saturday
7:20 Leave house with father who takes my sister to her lesson
7:50 Arrive at stables
8:30 Lesson start
9:30 Lesson end
10:30-11:00 Be picked up by father on his way back


Sunday
(not during exam weeks or when study is needed)
Be dropped off at stables and picked up midday or late afternoon, depending on parents preference.


Does this sound doable? I found out that I will have to buy rather than lease because there are absolutely no arrangements available in my area (especially for agistment arranged by myself). However, good horses sell fast here and if I can find a good horse within my price range I will have no issue selling it and any supplies if it does not work out.
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post #2 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 04:34 AM
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You have certainly put a tremendous amount of careful thought into thus, that as got to count fir something, right?
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post #3 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 05:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
You have certainly put a tremendous amount of careful thought into thus, that as got to count fir something, right?
Wow, I agree!

As for costs, the only thing I would add is something for vet emergencies. We "budget" one emergency a year and a typical night/weekend emergency farm call for us totals about $250 as an example.

Since you've gone through the trouble of making a PowerPoint presentation (very impressive and professional, I'll add), consider a style tip from someone who did corporate executive presentations for many years. Put your total cost numbers as bullets on one slide, and put your details in an Excel spreadsheet (or any spreadsheet program) at the end, what we call backup/supporting material. Executives like to see the big picture, i.e. bottom line costs all summarized on one slide with the details (i.e. spreadsheet) as reference to "justify" your totals and show your thoroughness and thought.

Good luck!

On the sixth day, God created the Quarter Horse.
On the seventh day, he Painted the good ones.
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post #4 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 06:39 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares View Post
Since you've gone through the trouble of making a PowerPoint presentation (very impressive and professional, I'll add), consider a style tip from someone who did corporate executive presentations for many years. Put your total cost numbers as bullets on one slide, and put your details in an Excel spreadsheet (or any spreadsheet program) at the end, what we call backup/supporting material. Executives like to see the big picture, i.e. bottom line costs all summarized on one slide with the details (i.e. spreadsheet) as reference to "justify" your totals and show your thoroughness and thought.
Thank you for the tip!
I am arranging an Excel spreadsheet right now. I'm currently about 3/4 of the way through the Powerpoint itself and now just have to make a short, creative video to further show my commitment. I hope all this work helps my cause!
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post #5 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 06:50 AM
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Could you get yourself a part time job at all? Money comes down to it at the end of the day. When i was at school all i wanted was a horse of my own but i was always thinking i'd be relying on my parents to pay for absolutely everything, even down to picking me up and dropping me off. The problem is and i don't mean to come off as being against owning a horse without the means (and you've put a lot of time and thinking into this) but you'd ideally need to have a full time job to afford horses. They are hugely expensive, vet bills come at you when you least expect and unless you have horsey parents or land, grazing takes a hit out of the bank account. Also, $1500 for a horse? are you an experienced rider, if so are you intending on buying a green horse? Over in NZ you'll get a greenbroke horse or a half run into the ground nag or a horse that has 'issues' or is not sound for that price. A good safe, youngish horse that has mileage and is somewhat established, can teach you the ropes but something that you can work/learn on goes for $5000 up. Just wondering and you could very well be getting a deal from your stable. i'm sure you've heard it many times and you know what you want to do but if you have horses in your life it takes up most of your time off and you are left with no money, rarely can have the money to travel etc. But I would not have it any other way and i'm sure you'll feel the same when you get your first pony!

Best of luck to you and you're future adventures :)
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post #6 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 08:02 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by LoftyCastle View Post
Could you get yourself a part time job at all? Money comes down to it at the end of the day. When i was at school all i wanted was a horse of my own but i was always thinking i'd be relying on my parents to pay for absolutely everything, even down to picking me up and dropping me off. The problem is and i don't mean to come off as being against owning a horse without the means (and you've put a lot of time and thinking into this) but you'd ideally need to have a full time job to afford horses. They are hugely expensive, vet bills come at you when you least expect and unless you have horsey parents or land, grazing takes a hit out of the bank account. Also, $1500 for a horse? are you an experienced rider, if so are you intending on buying a green horse? Over in NZ you'll get a greenbroke horse or a half run into the ground nag or a horse that has 'issues' or is not sound for that price. A good safe, youngish horse that has mileage and is somewhat established, can teach you the ropes but something that you can work/learn on goes for $5000 up. Just wondering and you could very well be getting a deal from your stable. i'm sure you've heard it many times and you know what you want to do but if you have horses in your life it takes up most of your time off and you are left with no money, rarely can have the money to travel etc. But I would not have it any other way and i'm sure you'll feel the same when you get your first pony!

Best of luck to you and you're future adventures :)
Thank you for your response.
I am experienced in stock riding but not particularly English riding - which I have started to learn. I have been doing a lot of research on the horses in my area and have found that there are plenty of horses perfect for what I want. I am not competing and as such don't require a show quality horse. The horses I have found in my price range are perfect for what I want and the recent lack of rain has seen a dramatic increase in horses for sale. Most of the time the low prices are sales due to children with no interest, people discovering that it costs more than they thought and the droughts. These horses are still very safe and my trainer will be assisting me in finding a suitable horse if my parents are convinced.

As for a part time job, I unfortunately have no chance. I live on an island with a teenage population of about 2000 with very, very few jobs available within 15 minutes. Jobs are pretty much impossible to get here unless you are over 18 or know people. There are no more opportunities for jobs until you are 40 minutes away from the island. However, my school has started informing students of unadvertised job openings so I may have a chance this year.

In terms of money, my parents will be able to afford any vet issues and the cost of the horse however they do not like spending more money than they have to and they already see a horse as a huge expense. They will not buy me a horse over $1500 (if they buy me one at all) so unfortunately I don't have the option of getting the type of horse that I would learn best on.
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post #7 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 08:26 AM
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It's good that your parents are supportive. The one thing I think will be a problem is arriving at the stable at 7 am ( great Dad for being willing to do this) is that it could be right at feeding time and not a great time for working with your horse, also an hour is not really enough time to do much with your horse. You might just get started on something and then it's time to put the horse away, no time to work through any issues. Could you be dropped off the school bus at the stable on the way home? That way you won't be confined to such a tight time schedule and can enjoy your time with your horse more.
You have really thought this out and I hope everything works out for you. You mentioned that it is almost impossible to find a horse to lease, but if you do buy your own horse, would it be possible to part lease your horse to someone to help with expenses? Good luck.
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post #8 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 09:03 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodhaven View Post
It's good that your parents are supportive. The one thing I think will be a problem is arriving at the stable at 7 am ( great Dad for being willing to do this) is that it could be right at feeding time and not a great time for working with your horse, also an hour is not really enough time to do much with your horse. You might just get started on something and then it's time to put the horse away, no time to work through any issues. Could you be dropped off the school bus at the stable on the way home? That way you won't be confined to such a tight time schedule and can enjoy your time with your horse more.
You have really thought this out and I hope everything works out for you. You mentioned that it is almost impossible to find a horse to lease, but if you do buy your own horse, would it be possible to part lease your horse to someone to help with expenses? Good luck.
I can hope that they're supportive, I'm not feeling too confident but there's no harm in trying!

My dad normally leaves at 6:20, and I am almost certain that he would support me in my plan. My mother is very against anything to do with horses though so I'm hoping that he will help convince her.

The stables are located right next to an extremely busy road and are on the opposite side of the road when the bus goes past. It might also be a bit difficult considering that the speed limit is 100kmh, or 62mph. I don't think it'd be easy to take care of a horse squashed

Luckily the stables feed at around 8:30/9:00 so I don't have to worry about that. I'll mostly just be checking on them, maybe grooming them a bit and perhaps doing a little bareback work in the arena so I don't have to spend time saddling.

I'm 99% sure that I would be able to part lease to one of the other students. I was thinking of maybe part leasing during the week so the horse will get worked even if I'm busy with exams.
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post #9 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 09:55 AM
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The board costs seems very low to me- in my area, I would expect it to be between $400-$500 (US) monthly, or about $100 weekly give or take. But I know that is something that varies tremendously region to region. Hay costs also seem underestimated to me, but may balance out if you have good pasture/grazing for significant portions of the year.

Otherwise, I agree with everyone else that you've really done your best to present this in a clear, rational way- bravo for that, and good luck!
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post #10 of 35 Old 01-06-2015, 10:31 AM
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I would raise the price of the saddle/girth/stirrups. I just finished getting my lease horse a fitting saddle, girth and new stirrups, and it was nowhere near 500. The saddle was 1500, girth and stirrups came to just under 75. Each fitting session cost $100, and we've had 2 with one more in another couple months. Plus we're getting the flocking readjusted in a couple months, so that's an extra expense. So about $2000 total to get a nicely fitting saddle for the horse. Finding a secondhand saddle might save you a lot of money, but it's a crapshoot in terms of quality and fit of the saddle. It's worth it to spend the extra bucks on ensuring a good saddle fit. If you do decide on getting a secondhand saddle(because money!), I would still suggest hiring a saddle fitter to advise you. :)
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