Feeding A Thoroughbred - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 08-26-2014, 03:34 PM Thread Starter
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Feeding A Thoroughbred

Hi everyone I bought my TB around 4 months ago and as winter is approaching I am starting to buy in feed for the winter. My horse has no feed over summer and lives purely on grass. He has quite a belly for a TB.

So I was just wondering when I should start feeding him ready for winter, how much and what he should have? He will start having one haynet a day throughout winter from the end of September/ early October time.
He is not highly strung or fizzy so doesn't need any sort of calmer. However I don't want anything that will start him being this way as he can be a handful sometimes when riding as he is forward but safe.
So thankyou for reading and any help would be very gratefully accepeted! New horsey owner here who is a little nervous for the first winter ahead with my horsey!
Thankyou x
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post #2 of 6 Old 08-26-2014, 08:51 PM
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What are you planning on feeding, how much does he/she weigh, and what are your winter plnas for him her? If he/she is an easy keeper why not just keep feeding hay and give a ration balancer w/beet pulp?

The blood runs hot in the Thoroughbred and the courage runs deep. In the best of them, pride is limitless. This is their heritage and they carry it like a banner. What they have, they use. - C.W. Anderson
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post #3 of 6 Old 08-26-2014, 10:26 PM
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As suggested if the horse is not getting any additional feeds, then hay and a ration balancer or vitamin and mineral supplement might work well. Just remember that a horse needs 1.5-3% of it's bodyweight in forage a day, that's 15 to 30 pounds for a 1000 pound horse.(453kg horse=6-13kg of hay.)
Also if the temperature drops below 30*F (-1*C) then you need to add about 2 pounds (almost 1kg) of hay per 10 degrees it drops below that 30/-1*
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post #4 of 6 Old 08-27-2014, 01:13 AM
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Agree with others. Grass hay, and an appropriate nutritional supplement. If he starts losing condition & is eating all of his hay, up the hay before adding anything else. Alfalfa/lucerne is one good low carb additive if you need extra, along with beet pulp, copra meal, rice bran, etc.

Why are you planning on only feeding one net a day? Is this because he'll still have adequate grazing & you just want to be sure, or that he'll get other stuff... or that your net's a huge, small holed one, so it'll keep him going for 24 hrs?? Regardless how huge, a small holed(slow feed) net is a good idea IME, and it will mean he will take a lot longer to get through it, rather than gorge & then go hungry, as standing around with an empty belly is not good for horses.
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post #5 of 6 Old 08-27-2014, 06:43 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Agree with others. Grass hay, and an appropriate nutritional supplement. If he starts losing condition & is eating all of his hay, up the hay before adding anything else. Alfalfa/lucerne is one good low carb additive if you need extra, along with beet pulp, copra meal, rice bran, etc.

Why are you planning on only feeding one net a day? Is this because he'll still have adequate grazing & you just want to be sure, or that he'll get other stuff... or that your net's a huge, small holed one, so it'll keep him going for 24 hrs?? Regardless how huge, a small holed(slow feed) net is a good idea IME, and it will mean he will take a lot longer to get through it, rather than gorge & then go hungry, as standing around with an empty belly is not good for horses.
He will still have adequate grazing all the time through winter but only one haynet as he puts weight on fast. He will still be worked daily over winter as much as possible so I want something that will keep his condition as when I bought him at the end of last winter he was quite skinny and I was told by his old owner that he does drop weight easily over winter.
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post #6 of 6 Old 08-27-2014, 01:43 PM
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Horses maintain their body heat by eating. Consuming hay keeps him warm in addition to providing nutrition. If he dropped weight over the winter, it may be that he needed more hay. I'd watch him very carefully this winter and if you see him begin to drop weight, add more hay. It is far easier to prevent a horse from losing weight than it is to get them to gain weight. Thoroughbreds (at least here in SC) don't grow the hair coat that some other breeds do to keep them warm. Our OTTB always has the thinnest coat on the farm. I would make sure he has something (hay) to chew on when the temps drop at night.
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