Feeling pressured to shoe my barefoot horse - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 04:27 AM
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Originally Posted by KsKatt View Post
I rescued a TB gelding who rated about a one and a half, weight wise. After he started putting on some real weight, he started limping. Xrays showed Navicular. We went the usual way and put on the shoes with wedges. A lady on a forum I was on at the time highly recommended Barefoot. She cited studies and spoke of personal experience. I figured that when we pulled the shoes he would limp for a little just getting use to being level again. I found a wonderful Barefoot trimmer and had him done. He never did take a lame step! It's been almost two years and he is still sound.
All horses are different and I'm sure Barefoot would not work on all Navicular horses, but I do bet that it would help many. Mostly if they haven't deteriorated too much due to the shoes. I can't explain it, but the wedges actually cause more damage, even if they do make the horse seem sound. I will try to find the link that explains it.
All I know is that it was like a miracle for Charlie!

Barefoot is being used to get navicular horses sound when all else has failed and it has a far better success rate than many other treatments. Read the Rockley Farm Blog as she documents the horses' progress with weekly photographs. Insurance companies are even paying for barefoot treatment for navicular there.
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post #22 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 08:49 AM
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Welcome to the forum & welcome to horseworld! I don't know how many other 'passions' are like this, but it seems that the horse world has got at least it's fair share of one eyed opinions on just about every conceivable topic! Unfortunately if you find yourself in a barn full of people passionately opposed to your view... & as you're a 'newbie' they probably feel freer to give you their advice unasked for! Hopefully they're a respectful mob tho, and with any luck, you & your horse may be able to lead by example - they may see that perhaps going shoeless isn't so bad!

Re rocky footing & protection, yeah, if the horse lives in a 'nice' paddock & doesn't get much exposure to hard ground, even if feet are healthy & strong, like your own feet if you only go bare on shagpile, they'll likely need protection for some surfaces. Hoof boots are one great alternative, so the horse can go bare the majority of time, in the paddock & arena, but you can put them on for any rough riding you do.
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post #23 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 09:56 AM
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That whole phenomenon of people pressuring/ostracising/etc someone who makes different decisions to themselves even though they are objectively reasonable and valid decisions is probably because it's psychologically threatening for a lot of people that the whole world doesn't think like they do.

It's like that subverted saying, Everybody is entitled to my opinion!
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post #24 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 01:11 PM
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Hi, I fully understand you, in certain places they think that if you don't put shoes on, your horse won't ever be able to make two steps before falling lame on the ground.

If your horse is fine barefoot, I don't see why you should change things.

Only exception? If he is stabled in anything less than a seriously clean stable.
If he's pastured outside, he'll be fine. Trouble is, hooves don't like standing in horse's urine all day long. Most horses who live 24/7 in a box need shoes so the iron can protect them from pee. Same with horses who live in paddocks so small that they become muddy/urine-filled when it's not dry enough.
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post #25 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 03:10 PM Thread Starter
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She is out for half the day in a rocky, muddy more natural paddock and in half the day in a very clean, deeply bedded stall. She's ridden mostly in the arena but I've started taking her on roads and trails too. The trimmer recommended that I spray iodine on the bottom of her hooves once or twice a week to dry them out and stop thrush (a lot of horses have thrush in my area). We live in a very wet climate.

What brand of boots work best?
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post #26 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 04:59 PM
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My response would be "Are you paying for the shoeing?" That is usually the end of the subject. Don't worry about boots. She may or not be tender on gravel but the positive is it will help toughen her soles.



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post #27 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 05:48 PM
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Shoes or no shoes are going to depend entirely on the horse and what you use them for.

What sort of jumping do you do? Do you ever feel your horse slip when you take off for a jump, or make a sharp turn to get to one? If so, you might want to consider shoes for traction. If not, then she's probably fine.

I barrel race with my horse and I noticed that when I started picking up speed with him, he would slip on certain ground. I put shoes on him for traction. He feels great! Doesn't slip anymore. While he does have a front end issue that requires shoes for soundness, I would shoe him anyway on all 4 feet because he gets better traction for running barrels.

My 3-year-old is currently barefoot and he will stay that way until he proves to me that he needs shoes for some reason.

If the horse needs shoes, then shoe them.
If they don't, then don't.
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post #28 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cielo Notturno View Post
Most horses who live 24/7 in a box need shoes so the iron can protect them from pee.
Of course, standing in gluppity glup is not good for hooves. Standing around in a clean stable or yard... or even paddock, if the horse is not motivated to exercise(eg horses kept singularly in paddocks where feed & water is in one spot.) - is not good for the horse & hoof strength is one of the things that suffer. Iron(or otherwise) shoes do not protect the feet from urine or such, just help hold them together when they're in bad shape.

Quote:
She is out for half the day in a rocky, muddy more natural paddock and in half the day in a very clean, deeply bedded stall. She's ridden mostly in the arena but I've started taking her on roads and trails too. The trimmer recommended that I spray iodine on the bottom of her hooves once or twice a week to dry them out and stop thrush (a lot of horses have thrush in my area). We live in a very wet climate.

What brand of boots work best?
That she is cooped up for half the time, and that she lives in mud are problems, which makes it a lot more likely she will need hoof protection in certain situations. Keeping her out in a paddock with a herd would generally be much better, BUT then she may be in mud 24/7, which stabling may provide the only respite from. In that case, I'd be keeping her stabled for a few hrs daily at least, in the wet seasons, to have at least a small amount of time to be dry & clean each day.

Re thrush & wet feet, yes, they will be far more 'prone' than dry environment hooves. I'd be cleaning her feet when you bring her in & packing her feet, sulcii etc, with salt. That will help dry them out & also kill any bugs. Volcanic/active clay is another alternative/additive. Mixing clay & salt will help it stick too. If thrush is already a problem, I'd also be spraying with ACV or t-tree daily. Iodine will also work, though not so much to dry out feet, but it is deactivated with contact from dirt & air, which makes it very short acting on hooves & twice weekly, esp for a horse living in mud, would be not much point.

What kind of boots? Generally speaking, the best boots for your particular horse are the ones that fit her best. They come in different shapes & sizes & the biggest factor is fit. Then there are questions of easy of use, toughness(eg do you do serious hard, long riding in rough country or only shorter, easier trail rides?), etc. If you look at the Easycare Downunder site; Easycare Down Under - largest range Easycare hoof boots & Easyshoes - Hoof Boot Range & Sizing info you will find some good info on why & how to choose the most appropriate boots for your situation. Renegades are another good boot brand to consider, along with Easycare's range.

Quote:
Don't worry about boots. She may or not be tender on gravel but the positive is it will help toughen her soles.
Afraid Saddle, I have to very strongly disagree with you on that. It is something that really irks me, that this idea(I think legacy of Dr Strasser) still persists. It is a common source of problems & injury of horses who's too little educated owners wish to 'transition them'. As such it is also a very common reason for ill advised people saying 'I tried barefoot but it didn't work'.

If you have only ever gone bare on carpet & someone forced you to run bare on gravel(& with extra weight on your back), or if you'd just had a few hrs soak in the bath & someone made you do the same(like a horse that lives in mud who's feet are soft).... or imagine if you had a foot problem - perhaps you've always needed arch supports, perhaps you've burned your feet or otherwise have little skin & callus protecting the soles at the moment.... If you were forced to just 'suck it up' & put up with being 'ouchie', then you may well eventually still 'toughen up', but at the expense of a lot of suffering & potentially serious injury in the meantime. If however, you were sensible about it, and protected/supported your feet when necessary, to allow you to do as much as possible bare without injury or much discomfort, your feet will become tougher, quicker, without any suffering.

Agree with Beau, that IME traction is one reason you may choose to shoe, that for jumping & speed events, boots may not be good enough for this. Just that I wouldn't be shoeing a 3yo horse regardless - I wouldn't be jumping/racing an immature horse, or doing much at all on the back of a 3yo & wouldn't put shoes on a horse prior to maturity either(rare, orthopedic reasons aside).
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post #29 of 45 Old 07-08-2014, 11:10 PM
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Welcome to the forum! :)


To answer your question, it isn't any of their business and they could just be trying to start up drama. Please don't let these other boarders pressure you into getting your horse shod. If your mare seems to be sound and has healthy hooves, I wouldn't worry about it at all.

My mare went barefoot the majority of her life. I only recently put shoes on her due to my veterinarian's recommendations.
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post #30 of 45 Old 07-09-2014, 06:44 AM
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Re boots - Easyboots didn't work for my horse even though I had a wire-fastened model, and I think the Renegades are the best designed ones on the market. See also: https://www.horseforum.com/hoof-care/...-boots-339666/

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