Gaining confidence after a wreck - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 02:19 AM
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I agree that falling should not be to the front of a riding plan. However, sooner or later you are going to part company even with the steadiest of steeds.

I ride English amd when I started the saddles were flat with no knee rolls so it was easy to fall when something happened.

We also played a lot of gymkhana games which involved jumping off at speed, that teaches you how to get your feet under you when landing. Not something that is easy (dismounting at speed) in a western saddle. We also rode ponies which made getting on at speed easier.

One instructor I knew would teach her pupils to practise falling by having them put their arms around the horse's neck and then throwing a leg over the saddle and landing on their feet. I could never agree with this as the forst thing that disappears in most incidents it the horse's head!
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post #22 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by BeAppy View Post
Hello Horse lovers

First of all let me introduce myself as im new here My name is Kaleigh in 27 and have been riding only about six months, Im the proud first time momma of a beautiful strawberry roan appaloosa. In the last month i have taken two falls off my boy and after this last one when I did get back on i had an anxiety attack and started to cry and had to get off Commanche. this bothers me because I love my horse and want to ride and have fun with him and will be all revved up to get on him and then scared once im on his back its sad because he is so lovely. Also both times i have fallen off it has been at a lope and now im too nervous to even trot. Has anyone ever had this issue and can you help me with tips to deal with my nervousness here any advice would be appreciated

Thanks and Happy trails
Kaleigh
This to me says a balance issue. Whether it is the horse's balance and you are loping in too small an area, he is picking up the wrong lead or he just is not smooth OR it is you that is off balance OR a combination - you need to address it. The most obvious way is to find an instructor to evaluate and help with what is needed. Going back to walking and staying comfortable with that as well as just simply enjoying your horse will be a balm to your spirit in the meantime. From your post I feel you bought for looks and there is certainly the potential that you are over horsed or he is just as green as you are. This may not be the case but there is no clarity above. You also don't mention where and how you ride.
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post #23 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
As the old saying goes, 'If you can't take the heat in the kitchen, don't cook'

Anyone who gets on a horse can expect to fall off sooner or later. Get use to the idea. Do it often and, like most things, the more you do it the better you get at it.

Of course you are nervous, you are a total novice, have gone out and bought a horse when you have little experience and probably no help when you ride.

You need to be riding under instruction. You didn't say if the horse did anything wrong or if you just lost your balance.

The only way to get over fear is to face it head on. Get an instructor who will not allow you to get panicky, climb back on and kick on.

This above is tough - so is horse riding! You will not get sympathy from me, it isn't in my book! . I rode naughty ponies and had many falls and injuries. When I arrived home, my mother would just laugh and if I moaned she told me to stop. The sympathy was, "worse to come before you die" or "worse things happen at sea, you don't drown riding horses" so you can see where it came from.
I had a few tough falls (most recently bruised the tissue around my liver) and I finally set my ego aside and bought a vest protector. I didn't wear it for months, but eventually looked at it as one would view a helmet. I find that I just feel a bit more secure in the saddle with one less thing thing I needed to dwell on so much. I'm a bit more relaxed and my posture looks great. 😀

All my best !
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post #24 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
I'm going to disagree with this comment. (I do agree wholeheartedly with the instruction recommendation, its also less $$$ than the ER!)

Falling does not have to be, in fact it should not be an accepted or anticipated part of your program. Can it happen and is it an eventuality? Most likely yes but that doesn't mean you have to "get used" to it. I try to avoid it at all costs.

We become what we think about most. Think about falling off or dwell on riding to not fall off (you're still thinking about it) and indeed you will fall off. Think about becoming a better rider and respecting your limitations while simultaneously taking small steps to improve (you AND your horse) and you will achieve this ad greatly improve you odds of staying in the saddle.

If you allow your ego or wishful thinking to write checks your skill and experience level can't cash you're going to continue to fall off.

I have taken a couple of spills. One was absolutely my fault, one was a sage grouse flushing directly under my horse which scared the poop out of me, and the third was a bizarre pavement slip that to this day I still don't know WTH happened.

I ride accepting there is a risk of falling off, but I never get on expecting to fall. Big difference.
I think we all have experienced a time when our mindset has worked against us. I would suggest the OP turn her thoughts from falling again to determining what caused two similar falls and working to correct that. She should not be feeling that she is not a capable rider at whatever level she is at, but should know and concentrate on what areas she needs to improve. The saying that when you fall you should get right back on is true, but that does not mean that you need to get back on and attempt something difficult right away. In thinking back about the falls I have taken, I realize that most of them were my fault and therefore something that I could do to eliminate happening again.
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post #25 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
One very good exercise to teach riders on how to land feet first is to practise jumping on and off when the horse is moving.

Easier with an English saddle than a western one.
I saw the most amazing thing about a month ago.

A gal was riding a horse that must have gotten stung. It went straight up into the air a short ways, the gal kicked her feet out of the stirrups and landed on her feet next to the horse. Never saw anybody with such quick reflexes.

It was that girls first time ever riding. She caught her horse and mounted before any of us could help her. She was a pretty confident gal!

The rest of us where all in awe though we all agreed that we would have all stayed on the horse and not bailed ship.
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post #26 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
...Anyone who gets on a horse can expect to fall off sooner or later. Get use to the idea. Do it often and, like most things, the more you do it the better you get at it...
Do that in the Sonoran Desert, and you'll be dead or crippled before long. I've been riding 7 years. I started at 50, and a few months later had my one fall. That was in Jan 2009, and it was 5 years before I could go jogging again. Even now, I sometimes take 400 mg of motrin an hour before riding to help loosen up my back.

One of the big changes I made after my fall was to switch from an English to an Australian saddle.



If things started to go wrong, it was much easier to stay in this saddle than this one:



If changing tack is cheating, remember what an instructor pilot in F-4s used to say: "you no have will to cheat, you no have will to win!"

If you don't have someone to teach you, buy "Common Sense Horsemanship":

http://www.amazon.com/Common-Sense-H...e+Horsemanship

Read it and think about it. It is geared toward jumping, but I still show its influence even though I don't jump or ride English any more:



If you are not comfortable cantering, don't. My daughter once, at my insistence, tried to get Trooper to canter. He spent 45 minutes refusing. Afterward, she admitted she was afraid of trying. Trooper, good horse that he was and is, did what she wanted, not what she said.

About a year later, she was trotting...and asked for a canter. Trooper shifted into a canter. Now she loves it - but it came on HER timing.

Me? I honestly could go the rest of my life at a walk and trot and be happy. This is my high goal of riding:



Take things at your own pace. Enjoy riding. Use tack to cheat, if needed. Take falls seriously. Don't expect falls. Take sensible precautions, and explore your limits without trying to exceed them.

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #27 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by bsms View Post

Take things at your own pace. Enjoy riding. Use tack to cheat, if needed. Take falls seriously. Don't expect falls. Take sensible precautions, and explore your limits without trying to exceed them.
LOVE this! With one disclaimer: I have no problem using tack to "cheat" but it should never be used as a substitute for good riding habits. And for the record I do not think you were saying that.
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post #28 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
I agree that falling should not be to the front of a riding plan. However, sooner or later you are going to part company even with the steadiest of steeds.

I ride English amd when I started the saddles were flat with no knee rolls so it was easy to fall when something happened.

We also played a lot of gymkhana games which involved jumping off at speed, that teaches you how to get your feet under you when landing. Not something that is easy (dismounting at speed) in a western saddle. We also rode ponies which made getting on at speed easier.

One instructor I knew would teach her pupils to practise falling by having them put their arms around the horse's neck and then throwing a leg over the saddle and landing on their feet. I could never agree with this as the forst thing that disappears in most incidents it the horse's head!
Excellent point. When an unscheduled dismount is inevitable end it on your terms if at all possible. It's pretty amazing how the brain can "slow down time" and in the span of a few hundredths of a second we can spot a soft(er) landing zone. When the sage grouse flushed under us I remember choosing a spot with no logs on which to auger in like a well tossed lawn dart.
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post #29 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
Excellent point. When an unscheduled dismount is inevitable end it on your terms if at all possible. It's pretty amazing how the brain can "slow down time" and in the span of a few hundredths of a second we can spot a soft(er) landing zone. When the sage grouse flushed under us I remember choosing a spot with no logs on which to auger in like a well tossed lawn dart.
haha . . . wonderful description. The picture is vivid in my mind.
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post #30 of 33 Old 08-01-2015, 12:43 PM
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I agree with bsms--riding is meant to be enjoyed. Do what makes you happy <3 Well said!

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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