Getting out there in the horse world.. - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 28 Old 08-21-2013, 10:55 PM
Yearling
 
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I, too, thought I knew a bit about horses...until I joined this forum LOL
I always accepted the fact I didn't know TOO awful much, but I thought I knew a little. Turns out I was pretty ignorant.

You will pick things up in time, a long, long, long time. Sadly, not all lesson programs go thoroughly into things like care, illness, breeds, etc etc

What part of Virginia are you in OP? I may be able to recommend some places.
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post #12 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 01:05 AM
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I grew up in a time before PCs and the www and there really weren't a lot of books available about horses at our school library which was pretty much my only source for books since we lived in the country and going to the public library wasn't an option. I read anything I could find though.

I learned because I had such a craving for knowledge on anything about horses and I would listen to horse owners talk and pick their brains if they let me. A lot by trial and error with my sister's horse and later my own pony (thankfully nothing that effected their health). And lastly a lot of horse know how is just plain old common sense, which allows you to filter good advice from bad, tells you if your horse has a health or injury issue or is just being a brat, whether you're feeding them right or not (look and act healthy? you're doing it right...too thin, dull coat, lack of energy, barring any illnesses, you need to change what you're feeding), etc...

What I find challenging these days is keeping up with all the advances they are making in genetics and horse keeping in general. About the time I think I know something they go and change it all up on me. LOL
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post #13 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 01:10 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you for all the responses! It's comforting to know that this isn't something you have to have grown up with.. It seems a strong passion and will to learn are a good start. :) I think I will check out some books for learning the breeds, colors, etc. I feel so clueless when people at the barn tell me, "oh you're riding the *insert color* today!" and I'm just like, uhhh.... I can only tell the paint apart and everybody else is just brown to me!

I also was talking to someone today that owns horses and she was telling me how she loves her new vet and recommended I shadow him! He apparently does a lot of foaling and showing.

xlionesss - I'm in Henrico. The area I'm at is very suburban - I couldn't go anywhere in my riding clothes!! But you just drive like 30 mins in one of two ways and you hit the rural areas. Let me know if you know of anybody.

I'll keep my eyes out for a potential "mentor" or at least just someone that's very experienced. I haven't really spent a lot of time with my trainer yet so just hanging around the barn more would probably be good too! I feel so out of place right now cause I generally have no idea what they're talking about.. But I guess to have to start somewhere!
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post #14 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 01:16 AM
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Originally Posted by mcfarawayland View Post
Thank you for all the responses! It's comforting to know that this isn't something you have to have grown up with.. It seems a strong passion and will to learn are a good start. :) I think I will check out some books for learning the breeds, colors, etc. I feel so clueless when people at the barn tell me, "oh you're riding the *insert color* today!" and I'm just like, uhhh.... I can only tell the paint apart and everybody else is just brown to me!

I also was talking to someone today that owns horses and she was telling me how she loves her new vet and recommended I shadow him! He apparently does a lot of foaling and showing.

xlionesss - I'm in Henrico. The area I'm at is very suburban - I couldn't go anywhere in my riding clothes!! But you just drive like 30 mins in one of two ways and you hit the rural areas. Let me know if you know of anybody.

I'll keep my eyes out for a potential "mentor" or at least just someone that's very experienced. I haven't really spent a lot of time with my trainer yet so just hanging around the barn more would probably be good too! I feel so out of place right now cause I generally have no idea what they're talking about.. But I guess to have to start somewhere!
Basic coat colors[edit source | editbeta]



Bay (left) and chestnut (right) mustangs.
Genetically, all horses start out as either chestnut, called "red" by geneticists, represented by the absence of the extension gene ("e"); or black based on the presence of the extension gene ("E"). Therefore, red ("ee") and black ("EE" or "Ee") are the two base colors.[1][2] The Bay color is expressed when the common genetic modifier, the Agouti gene works on the Black. The vast range of all other coat colors are created by additional genes' action upon one of these three coat colors.
Statistically, the most commonly seen horse color phenotypes are identified by the following terms:
Bay: Body color ranges from a light reddish-brown to very dark brown with "black points". (Points refer to the mane, tail, and lower legs.) The main color variations are:
Dark bay: very dark red or brown hair, difficult to distinguish from seal brown. Sometimes also called "black bay", "mahogany bay", or "brown".
Blood bay: bright red hair; often considered simply "bay".
Brown: The word "brown" is used by some breed registries to describe dark bays. There is a distinct allele that darkens a bay coat to seal brown (At), but it is not the cause of all forms of dark bay. Informally, "brown" is applied to many distinct coat colors. Most often, horses described by casual observers as "brown" are actually bay or chestnut. In the absence of DNA testing, chestnut and bay can be distinguished from each other by looking at the mane, tail and legs for the presence of black points.
Chestnut: A reddish body color with no black. Mane and tail are the same shade or lighter than the body coat. The main color variations are:
Liver chestnut: very dark brown coat. Sometimes a liver chestnut is also simply called "brown".
Sorrel: Reddish-tan to red coat, about the color of a new penny. The most common shade of chestnut.
Blond or light chestnut: seldom-used term for lighter tan coat with pale mane and tail that is not quite a dun.


A dapple gray
Gray: A horse with black skin but white or mixed dark and white hairs. Gray horses can be born any color, and lighten as they age. Most will eventually gray out to either a complete white or a "fleabitten" hair coat. Most "white" horses are actually grays with a fully white hair coat. A gray horse is distinguished from a white horse by dark skin, particularly noticeable around the eyes, muzzle, flanks, and other areas of thin or no hair. Variations of gray that a horse may exhibit over its lifetime include:
Salt and Pepper or "steel" gray: Usually a younger horse, an animal with white and dark hairs evenly intermixed over most of the body.
Dapple gray: a dark-colored horse with lighter rings of graying hairs, called dapples, scattered throughout.
Fleabitten gray: an otherwise fully white-haired horse that develops red hairs flecked throughout the coat.
Rose gray: a gray horse with a reddish or pinkish tinge to its coat. This color occurs with a horse born bay or chestnut while the young horse is "graying out".
Other coat colors[edit source | editbeta]



A black horse
Black: Black is relatively uncommon, though not "rare". There are two types of black, fading black and non-fading black. Most black horses will fade to a brownish color if the horse is exposed to sunlight on a regular basis. Non-fading black is a blue-black shade that does not fade in the sun. Genetically, the two cannot yet be differentiated, and some claim the difference occurs due to management rather than genetics, though this claim is hotly disputed. Most black foals are usually born a mousy grey or dun color. As their foal coat begins to shed out, their black color will show through, though in some breeds black foals are born jet black. For a horse to be considered black, it must be completely black except for white markings. A sun-bleached black horse is still black, even though it may appear to be a dark bay or brown. A visible difference between a true black and a dark chestnut or bay is seen in the fine hairs around the eyes and muzzle; on a true black these hairs are black, even if the horse is sun-bleached, on other colors, they will be lighter.
Brindle: One of the rarest colors in horses, possibly linked to chimerism. Characteristics are any color with "zebra-like" stripes, but most common is a brown horse with faint yellowish markings.


A buckskin
Buckskin: A bay horse with one copy of the cream gene, a dilution gene that "dilutes" or fades the coat color to a yellow, cream, or gold while keeping the black points (mane, tail, legs).
Champagne: Produced by a different dilution gene than the cream gene. It lightens both skin and hair, but creates a metallic gold coat color with mottled skin and light colored eyes. Champagne horses are often confused with palomino, cremello, dun, or buckskins.
Cream dilution, an incomplete dominant gene that produces a partially diluted coat color with one copy of the allele and a full dilution with two copies. Colors produced include Palomino, Buckskin, Perlino, Cremello and Smoky Cream or Smoky black.
Cremello: A horse with a chestnut base coat and two cream genes that wash out almost all color until the horse is a pale cream or light tan color. Often called "white", they are not truly white horses, and they do not carry the white (W) gene. A cremello usually has blue eyes.
Dun: Yellowish or tan coat with primitive markings, sometimes called "dun factors": a darker-colored mane and tail, a dorsal stripe along the back and occasionally faint horizontal zebra stripings on the upper legs and a possible transverse stripe across the withers. There are several variations of dun:
Grullo, Grulla, or Blue Dun: A horse with a black base color and the dun gene. Coat is solid "mouse-colored" gray or silver (can also be almost brownish-gray) with black or dark gray primitive markings.
Red dun: A chestnut base coat with dun factors. Coat is usually pale yellow or tan with chestnut (red) primitive markings.
"Bay dun" or "Zebra dun" are terms sometimes used to describe the classic dun color of yellow or tan with black primitive markings, used when necessary to distinguish it from red duns or grullos.
"Buckskin dun" or "Yellow dun" describes a dun that also carries the cream gene dilution and has a coat of pale gold with black mane, tail, legs and primitive markings.


This photograph shows the difference between a Pinto horse and an Appaloosa. The Pinto is on the left, the Appaloosa on the right.
Leopard: There are a group of coat patterns caused by the leopard gene complex. It should be noted that not every horse with leopard genetics will exhibit hair coat spotting. However, even solid individuals will exhibit secondary characteristics such as vertically striped hooves, mottled skin around the eyes, lips, and genitalia, plus a white sclera of the eye. Several breeds of horse can boast leopard-spotted (a term used collectively for all patterns) individuals including the Knabstrupper, Noriker, and the Appaloosa. There are several distinct leopard patterns:
blanket: white over the hip that may extend from the tail to the base of the neck. The spots inside the blanket (if present) are the same color as the horse's base coat.
varnish roan: a mix of body and white hairs that extends over the entire bodyŚno relation to true roan
snowflake: white spots on a dark body. Typically the white spots increase in number and size as the horse ages.
leopard: dark spots of varying sizes over a white body.
few spot leopard: a nearly white horse from birth that retains color just above the hooves, the knees, "armpits", mane and tail, wind pipe, and face
frost: similar to varnish but the white hairs are limited to the back, loins, and neck.


A palomino
Palomino: chestnut horse that has one cream dilution gene that turns the horse to a golden, yellow, or tan shade with a flaxen or white mane and tail. Often cited as being a color "within three shades of a newly minted gold coin", palominos range in shades from extremely light, almost cremello, to deep chocolate, but always with a white or flaxen mane and tail.
Pearl: Also called the "barlink factor", A dilution gene that when homozygous, lightens red coats to a uniform apricot-like color, often also resulting in horses with blue eyes. When combined with cream dilution, may produce horses that appear to be cremello or perlino.
Perlino: similar to a cremello, but is genetically a bay base coat with two dilute genes. Eyes are blue. Mane, tail and points are not black, but are usually darker than the body coat, generally a reddish or rust color, not to be confused with a red dun.
Pinto: a multi-colored horse with large patches of brown, white, and/or black and white. Variations include:
Piebald: a black and white spotting pattern (term more commonly used in the UK than the USA)
Skewbald: a spotting pattern of white and any other color other than black, or a spotting pattern of white and two other colors, which may include black. (term more commonly used in the UK than the USA).
Overo: Describes a group of spotting patterns genetically distinct from one another, characterized by sharp, irregular markings with a horizontal orientation, usually more dark than white. In some cases, the face is usually white, often with blue eyes. The white rarely crosses the back, and the lower legs are normally dark. Variations include "Frame Overo" and "Splashed white". Sometimes Sabino (below) is also classified in the overo family.
Sabino: Often confused with roan or rabicano, a slight spotting pattern characterized by high white on legs, belly spots, white markings on the face extending past the eyes and/or patches of roaning patterns standing alone or on the edges of white markings
Tobiano: Spotting pattern characterized by rounded markings with white legs and white across the back between the withers and the dock of the tail, usually arranged in a roughly vertical pattern and more white than dark, with the head usually dark and with markings like that of a normal horse. i.e. star, snip, strip, or blaze.
Tovero: spotting pattern that is a mix of tobiano and overo coloration, such as blue eyes on a dark head. May also refer to horses with Tobiano coloring that carry a recessive overo gene.
Paint: pinto horses with known Quarter Horse and/or Thoroughbred bloodlines. This is a separate breed of horse.


Left to right: A young gray (with few white hairs), a chestnut, and a bay roan
Rabicano: A roan-like effect that is caused by a genetic modifier that creates a mealy, splotchy, or roaning pattern on only part of the body, usually limited to the underside, flanks, legs, and tail head areas. Unlike a true roan, much of the body will not have white hairs intermingled with solid ones, nor are the legs or head significantly darker than the rest of the horse.
Roan: a color pattern that causes white hairs to be evenly intermixed within the horse's body color. Roans are distinguishable from greys because roans typically do not change color in their lifetimes, unlike gray that gradually gets lighter as a horse ages. Roans also have heads that are either solid-colored or much darker than their body hair, and do not lighten. Variations of roan include:
Red Roan: A chestnut base coat with roaning pattern with the mane and tail being the same red as the body. Red roans are also commonly referred to as a Strawberry Roan, and the term Red Roan is occasionally is used to describe a Bay Roan.[3]
Bay Roan: A Bay base coat with roaning pattern (the mane and tail of the Bay Roan will be Black). Bay roans are sometimes also called Red Roans.[3]
Blue Roan: A black with roaning pattern, not to be confused with a gray or a blue dun/grullo. A roan tends to have a darker head, while grays not only lighten with age, but their heads tend to lighten before the rest of their bodies. A blue roan has mixed-color hairs, a blue dun will usually be a solid color and have dun striping.


Silver dapple horses
Silver dapple: Caused by a dilution gene that only acts upon black hair pigment, it lightens black body hair to a chocolate brown and the mane and tail to silver. The gene may be carried but will not be visible on horses with a red base coat. Silver dapple horses may also be called Chocolate, Flax, or Taffy.
Smoky black: Horse visually appears to be either a black with a mildly bleached-out coat or a dull dark bay, but is actually has a black base coat and one copy of the cream gene.
Smoky Cream: Virtually indistinguishable from a cremello or perlino without DNA testing, a horse with a black base coat and two copies of the cream gene.
White : One of the rarest colors, a white horse has white hair and fully or largely unpigmented (pink) skin. These horses are born white, with blue or brown eyes, and remain white for life. The vast majority of so-called "white" horses are actually grays with a fully white hair coat. A truly white horse that lives to adulthood occurs one of two ways: either by inheriting one copy of a dominant white ("W") gene, of which several have been identified, or is a particular type of sabino that is homozygous for the "SB-1" gene. However, a foal with the genetic disease known as lethal white syndrome dies shortly after birth.[4] There are no "albinos" in the horse world. Albino, defined as animals with a white coat with pink skin and reddish eyes, is created by genetic mechanisms that do not exist in horses.[5] In some cases, homozygous dominant white is thought to be an embryonic lethal, though this has not been established for all white horses.
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post #15 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 01:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcfarawayland View Post
Thank you for all the responses! It's comforting to know that this isn't something you have to have grown up with.. It seems a strong passion and will to learn are a good start. :) I think I will check out some books for learning the breeds, colors, etc. I feel so clueless when people at the barn tell me, "oh you're riding the *insert color* today!" and I'm just like, uhhh.... I can only tell the paint apart and everybody else is just brown to me!
I really admire your gall to learn

Believe me I was the same way. Eventually I just.. I have no idea.. just kind of payed close attention to what made a certain horse a particular colour. I knew chestnut since it was my favourite colour.. but the rest I just read up on the "what colour is my horse" threads, looked up colour charts, asked mutual horse lovers.

I still don't know them all, but definitely know a lot more than I did.

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #16 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 01:48 AM Thread Starter
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Location: Virginia
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mrstorres2566 - oh my gosh thank you so much!! I haven't read through the whole thing yet but I think I will spend many nights studying this.. :)

skyseternalangel - hehe, why thank you I've been trying to do that but it's not going so great haha... people will be like, well don't you see how this one is different?! I'm just like, uhhh sureee.. lol

I've also been seeing bits and pieces about pony club so I finally looked it up just now.. It looks really interesting! From their website, it says "Some examples of lessons are: feed (cost and type), shoeing, vet visits, temperature, pulse and respiratory rate, training schedules, tack (types, care, fitting, construction, use), breeds of horses and ponies, safety issues, grooming, loading and hauling, First Aid, breeding/foaling, stable manners, under-standing horse sports, and so much more. "

That's like exactlyy the kind of thing I am looking to learn. Only roadblock I see at this point is that you generally have to own your own pony.. I do not and honestly it probably wouldn't be smart to - I'm going to college next year and I'm still so brand new to all of this.

Does anyone know of anything else like this though? I'm still going to see if it's possible that the one in my area will not require you have your own pony/horse but that's probably pretty unlikely.
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post #17 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 02:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcfarawayland View Post

Does anyone know of anything else like this though? I'm still going to see if it's possible that the one in my area will not require you have your own pony/horse but that's probably pretty unlikely.
I think you're better off volunteering your time at a riding program. I learned so much working for a therapeutic riding center.

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #18 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 02:49 AM Thread Starter
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Okay! Thanks so much. I will look around and see what I find. It seems like there is absolutely nothing around me... until I open my eyes and actually start looking!
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post #19 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 06:15 AM
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What a very sensible young person you seem to be!

I did grow up around horses. Never had my own but spent every moment I could at the local riding school helping out. It stood me in good stead for a long career with horses.

You can read all the books written about horses, look in the Internet, watch youtube but there is nothing like hands on experience.

One thing I can tell you, no matter how much you learn there is always more.

Good luck to you for your future.
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post #20 of 28 Old 08-22-2013, 07:17 AM
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Good for you OP, wanting to learn and knowing that we don't know everything is the start of "true wisdom" ;)
Is there an equine rescue near you? Best place in the world to learn, they are always short on volunteers and you get to see a lot in the way of behavioral problems and health issues.

We grow too soon old, and too late smart.
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