Hello from Norm from Alabama. Questions from the new guy. - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 07-14-2014, 05:39 PM Thread Starter
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Hello from Norm from Alabama. Questions from the new guy.

Hi guys! I tried to send a howdy to Mike but I'm too new so I'll reprint it here:


Thanks for the welcome Mike. This is Norm. I am here to learn something about the horse. After rambling around the net awhile your site looked to me to be just the place. I was about to go say hello on the New Guys board.

Super thanks!
Norm
I'm from Alabama

------------


I am new to HorseForum and new to horses. Sort of. I'm 59 and tangled with a mean pony when I was but just a tad and never had the occasion to ride one since. It didn't come with a user's manual and the owner didn't bother giving me driving lessons.

I have ridden neither horse nor pony since. The opportunity just never came up and I don't know any horse folks well enough to have gotten in the practice.

But...if you're still reading and wondering what this greenhorn is doing here...I discovered cowboy books mebbe 5 years ago. Everything I think I know about horses comes from that stuff.

I'm here to be educated. I have a few pretty specific and outstanding questions but I'm always up to absorbing knowledge wherever I can. I'm particularly interested in the working horse...brush pony aspect.

If you can teach me a couple of things and feel up to it I promise not to bore you or wear out my welcome. I have the forum marked. I'll be back!

Thanks
Norm
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post #2 of 9 Old 07-15-2014, 07:49 AM
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I think my grandfather read every cowboy book printed before he died. He preferred the horse on the page to being up close and personal but I think he had similar experiences as a youngster. Glad you're getting interested. So much to read here. You might enjoy this link to https://www.horseforum.com/horse-bree...yr-moo-144278/
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post #3 of 9 Old 07-15-2014, 08:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El Norm View Post
Hi guys! I tried to send a howdy to Mike but I'm too new so I'll reprint it here:


Thanks for the welcome Mike. This is Norm. I am here to learn something about the horse. After rambling around the net awhile your site looked to me to be just the place. I was about to go say hello on the New Guys board.Hello and welcome Norm! I belong to several horse forums and have to say, this forum is growing to be the best and friendliest all around forum

Super thanks!
Norm
I'm from Alabama

------------


I am new to HorseForum and new to horses. Sort of. I'm 59 and tangled with a mean pony when I was but just a tad and never had the occasion to ride one since. It didn't come with a user's manual and the owner didn't bother giving me driving lessons. There are stlll "sellers of horses" who misbehave like that, in today's world. Don't get led astray.

I have ridden neither horse nor pony since. The opportunity just never came up and I don't know any horse folks well enough to have gotten in the practice.

But...if you're still reading and wondering what this greenhorn is doing here...I discovered cowboy books mebbe 5 years ago. Everything I think I know about horses comes from that stuff.

I'm here to be educated. I have a few pretty specific and outstanding questions
Ask away! With such a large group and wide range of ages, there will be times when you'll get varying opinions. As far as basic/general care, we're all pretty much on the same page

but I'm always up to absorbing knowledge wherever I can. I'm particularly interested in the working horse...brush pony aspect. And we will give you plenty of information to absorb

If you can teach me a couple of things and feel up to it I promise not to bore you or wear out my welcome. I have the forum marked. I'll be back!It's pretty difficult to wear out welcomes on this forum, although a few have managed

We certainly hope you've bookmarked this forum; we would hate to impart all of our valuable information on you, only to have you misplace the link

Thanks
Norm
Along with the link Qtrbel provided, here a couple links in the "Horse Talk" section that may interest you:

The Over 40 folks

https://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk...r-40-a-111931/

The Over 50 folks
https://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk...r-50-a-213370/

You will meet other folks who are brand new to horse ownership; perhaps some of the answers to their questions might help you

https://www.horseforum.com/new-horses/

There are quite a few of us who have enough combined experience to carry us into the next three lifetimes.

I was raised on a dairy farm, where we farmed with horses until I was four. One grandfather had beef cattle and raised Welsh/Morgans.

I started paying and caring for my own horses when I was 12. I only had one adult year out of horses and that was the year I had to put my two almost 30 yr old horses to sleep. One of them had been born on my parents farm, so it was devastating.

It did take a whole year to recover but I still have the horse I bought at that time; he will be 27 in a few months and is the horse in my avatar.

Plus three others who are also up there in years. One of whom is my Sig picture. He is an Arab, was seven when I rescued him and, celebrated his 28th birthday a few months ago.


I'm a good bit older than you so, these four are my last; I will take them to their end times and lay them to rest in their own pasture.

There's a lot of us "up there" folks still active with our horses; believe me, we are more than willing to share what we know

Hope to hear from you often

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #4 of 9 Old 07-15-2014, 10:03 AM Thread Starter
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You might enjoy this link to https://www.horseforum.com/horse-bree...yr-moo-144278/

Hello QtrBel,

Looks like I came to the right place alright. You had me going wth the Lord Lubbaduck etc. I'm thinking that's a kinda different name for a cowboy book. Ha. Nice pictures! So, is that your horses?

I read just about every cowboy book in the liberry and a few grocery sack loads besides....then I moved on to ta da...hardcore! Now I'm into pioneer books. Using my Kindle a whole new world of free books opened up. Today I'm working on a book about a French guy who lived with the Creek Indians from 1776-1796 or so. I translated the original French into Engrish with Google Translate. Woof!

Norm
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post #5 of 9 Old 07-15-2014, 10:45 AM Thread Starter
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What a grand reply walkinthewalk!

Usually when I come to a new forum it's because I have some familiarity with the topic. This time around it's a little different.

Like I said, for whatever reason, I just never had any pals with horses. So up until the time I got into my cowboy books I thought a horse was a horse. Afterwards, I got onto THE trick. The critters have personalities! Ha. I just drew a hateful one when I was a tyke. (About like the red haired girl owner.)

Within 20 miles of here there is a place in the Choccolocco WMA at Coleman Lake that is a campground specifically for horse folks. They come from all over to ride the extensive trails. You may have heard of it. It's a big campground and many times of the year the place is full.

I see that you are from Middle Tennessee? That being the case your geography is not all the different from mine. I'm here at the tail end of the Smokies near Mt. Cheaha. Lots of up and down hollows and ridges in the woods.

Specifically, I'm here with a question that to horse folks might sound kinda self explanatory but has been bugging me since I moved on from cowboy books to pioneer books. And that is getting around in my kind of woods on a horse.

I know all about getting around out west...but what about out east? You just never run into that in literature. I mean, it's mentioned, but that's about it.

Suppose you wanted to get from point A to point B in our kind of mountains and you didn't have a trail handy? How would you go about it?

I am an outdoorsman used to trompling all the hills around here on foot, but I get to the vicinity on a road. Suppose you want to go cross country on a horse? That's what they used to have to do way back.

Tons of info about riding up on the mesa or across the burning sand, or through the glassy volcanic rock...but not an inkling about pulling my kind of hills horseback.

How would you do it? Is it done? You know, just light out through the forest.

Naturally this is illegal these days, getting off trail. At least I think it is...but if it wasn't and you wanted to...

I don't know if it could even be done. That's my question.

I'm working on a book series that takes place here locally about 80 years or so after society collapses, so it's start all over time. Can they count on horse transport through the untrodden forest or is it to be mostly walking?

Lately I have been reading about the Creek Indians. A Tennessee man by the name of Jackson made his way here to trade bullets in 1812. I know for a fact that some of the troops had horses and got around without trails on their ride from Ohatchee to Talladega. So it can be done. The book says "with difficulty."

But I don't have any details about how you'd do it. If you see what I mean. Some of the places I go on foot seems like it would be a might hard on a horse.

So, what do you think? Cross country on a horse? More leading than riding? I dunno. There just isn't any good data on it.

I'd most appreciate your insight!

Norm
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post #6 of 9 Old 07-15-2014, 01:52 PM
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Before I get into the meat of your post, you must see the NBC video in this link -- just as soon as you get past the dumb commercial, I think you're "is this possible?" will be answered way beyond your expectations


Happy trails: Woman travels country on horseback - Video on TODAY.com

The above story was done in September, 2012.

According to her blog, she's still at it and THIS is the person you'd want to get all your horse packing pointers from, IMHO. How I admire her

Current Ride | Ende of the Trail

Quote:
Originally Posted by El Norm View Post
What a grand reply walkinthewalk!

Usually when I come to a new forum it's because I have some familiarity with the topic. This time around it's a little different.

Like I said, for whatever reason, I just never had any pals with horses. So up until the time I got into my cowboy books I thought a horse was a horse. Afterwards, I got onto THE trick. The critters have personalities! Ha. I just drew a hateful one when I was a tyke. This puts an underline and bold letters on why I love my Arab. He used to be a lesson horse for small children and still gives little Tykes a happy horse memory, if they never again see another horse

(About like the red haired girl owner.)

Within 20 miles of here there is a place in the Choccolocco WMA at Coleman Lake that is a campground specifically for horse folks. They come from all over to ride the extensive trails. You may have heard of it. It's a big campground and many times of the year the place is full. I am originally from the OH/PA border. I wanted to retire to this area for the milder winters. That campground sounds familiar. I belong to a gaited horse forum where there are a lot of folks who spend their vacations traveling with their horses; that may be where I've heard of it.



I see that you are from Middle Tennessee? That being the case your geography is not all the different from mine. No and neither is the humidity - lol lol

I'm here at the tail end of the Smokies near Mt. Cheaha. Lots of up and down hollows and ridges in the woods. Same here. In this area everyone can live on some sort of hill. If you're on the flats, you're most likely in a flood plain

Specifically, I'm here with a question that to horse folks might sound kinda self explanatory but has been bugging me since I moved on from cowboy books to pioneer books. And that is getting around in my kind of woods on a horse.Piece of cake. I used to cut trails for the kids, using my little Arab/Morgan cross. He was so patient and so smart, all I had to do was literally park him beside a well-leafed tree. I could get out of sight of him, kiss to him, call his name and he would come meandering from around the bend. My Arab/Saddlebred was not at all about standing that still - he'd've made me walk home - lol

I was always about riding "where no man has been before", so the important thing is having a horse that subscribes to the same philosophy and is more importantly is physically capable.

My Arab/Morgan was short & stocky, making some things difficult for him.

My Arab/Saddlebred was tall, lean and a natural athlete; there wasn't much he couldn't conquer - tough as nails so he was

I currently have three Tennessee Walkers and one Arab. They are all point & go trail horses but with different levels of physical ability and work ethic. I can't ride like I used to, they all have some sort of health issue and range in age from 19 to 28, so are here for the duration and we just talk about the "Good Old Days" when we butt slid down some hill side into a river

I know all about getting around out west...but what about out east? You just never run into that in literature. I mean, it's mentioned, but that's about it.Have a solid well-mannered horse, pack a good folding saw and a set of hand clippers.

Or if you have a four-wheeler and you're allowed on the property, take a chainsaw and cut out the horse version of a logging trail

I prefer the folding saw and clippers because:
1. You get to do more with your horse.
2. It's more quiet and lot less invasive.

Suppose you wanted to get from point A to point B in our kind of mountains and you didn't have a trail handy? How would you go about it? I never did things like that on cloud covered days; if you can't see the sun and haven't learned to tell time by the position of the sun, you could end up in that famous place called "Timbucktwo"

Once I got my sun bearings, I would say to my horse "we're going this way" and off we'd go. I generally managed to come out within a mile or two of my expectations. Except for the time I was riding with my good friend, her two sisters and their aunt. They got in a big fight over where, in the Allegheny National Forest we were. They had all hunted those mountains and hills and each one of them was sure where we were. Trouble was, nobody could agree.

After we past a steaming-fresh pile of bear dung, we came upon a fisherman who graciously pointed us toward the road. By then it was night fall, you know how dangerous mountain roads can be after dark and it turned out we had TEN miles of road to get back to camp.

It was a wonderful wonderful sight to see my husband and my friend's husband looking for us. They went back to camp for the truck and trailer and saved us from having to ride the horses on that "main" road after dark. We were in our mid-30's and I still like to bring up how bad we were lost, when the timing is right

I am an outdoorsman used to trompling all the hills around here on foot, but I get to the vicinity on a road. Suppose you want to go cross country on a horse? That's what they used to have to do way back. The biggest issue would be fences. You can't cut thru somebody's fence and, if they are running cattle or horses, you don't want to attempt to travel across that pasture anyway - it's asking for trouble out of the bull and some geldings.

Llamas --- stay out of the llama pastures - I've got a story or two about that as well

Tons of info about riding up on the mesa or across the burning sand, or through the glassy volcanic rock...but not an inkling about pulling my kind of hills horseback.

How would you do it? Is it done? You know, just light out through the forest.

Naturally this is illegal these days, getting off trail. At least I think it is...but if it wasn't and you wanted to...

I don't know if it could even be done. That's my question.

I'm working on a book series that takes place here locally about 80 years or so after society collapses, so it's start all over time. Can they count on horse transport through the untrodden forest or is it to be mostly walking?

Lately I have been reading about the Creek Indians. A Tennessee man by the name of Jackson made his way here to trade bullets in 1812. I know for a fact that some of the troops had horses and got around without trails on their ride from Ohatchee to Talladega. So it can be done. The book says "with difficulty."

But I don't have any details about how you'd do it. If you see what I mean. Some of the places I go on foot seems like it would be a might hard on a horse.

So, what do you think? Cross country on a horse? More leading than riding? I dunno. There just isn't any good data on it.

The video link to Bernice Ende's cross-country trip probably answered the bulk of your last thoughts

It is entirely possible, IMO but today's world is full of nutcases and that would stop me from trying such an endeavor. I'm good if I've got a base camp, can travel out for a few days and then move my base camp to another place that is safe.

I'm just not that trusting of a person to try what Bernice Ende actually did. The non-trust would come from people I might stumble across in the woods or some yayhoo driving down the road that might think scaring or vandalizing my animals would be humorous entertainment.


Norm
--

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #7 of 9 Old 07-16-2014, 10:31 AM Thread Starter
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Hello walkinthewalk,

I want to give you an extra special compliment. It's getting more rare these days to run across someone who is comfortable writing more than two sentences. Also, it's rare to find someone who'll go the extra mile to help someone else, particularly a stranger. Thus, you're one to ride the river with, as they used to say.

I'm writing a strange little book series. Just got the first one in the can. I'll do three more and start on the next before turning the first four loose.

The action begins 80 years after society collapses. Even though it's set in the future, the whole thing is based on what it was like at the start of the country, circa 1700-1850, more or less. It's sort of a combo fiction/survival thing. Lots of practical info with a good storyline.

Now, practically speaking, the lady in the news piece would have been right at home in my future. The trails of the times are the roads and interstates of today. Fences are all rusted and gone for the most part.

So, from what you're telling me, a good strong horse who likes this sort of thing could do the up the hollow down the hollow thing. Jeez. Seems like a dirty trick to play on the critter. I was wondering if it were possible. It is.

Now, my story is set where I live, so I'm very familiar with the lay of the land. For the most part the trails would serve, but there might come an occasion where a character would need to light out cross country. Jackson and his boys did that very thing in 1812 when they rode from Ohatchee to Talladega.

I can't tell you how many times we have been out for a drive in the woody woods and I look off the road and try to imagine how difficult it was to get around before the roads were built. What you answered was that yep, a good horse could do it so if one had one then one wouldn't have to wear out one's mockersons to go visit the neighbors.

Of course, the roads are based on Indian trails..some of 'em dating back 10,000 years so unless you have a special need to get back in the woods, paths were always available.

I am a woodsman sure, but I gotta tell you...Before I got my GPS I surely didn't venture far off the track bekez I would surely get turned around. Ha. That and the digital calculator are two of the greatest inventions ever!

In the future I'm constructing, you'd be lucky indeed to have a horse. It's going to be mostly foot. Also, creek and river travel will come back into play big time. All the dams are blown out by this time so with a boat and paddle you can go from the east coast to the Rockies if you're of a mind.

Horses are my doggone sore spot. I wish I had had more actual experience. You can get only so much from a book.

But you know something? What you have imparted to me follows pretty much exactly what my books have to allow. Only, you're talking fact, and the books are speaking fiction. It's always best to go to the expert and you provide positive verification.

Boy, this must sound pretty dumb. Ha! (A professed outdoorsman who is ignorant of the equine way.) It's just that in my part of the country, there aren't so many horses. It's pretty populous. And country folks don't do horses as much as they could around here. It's more about cows and hay.

Welp, walkinthewalk, I can't tell you how much I appreciate your good common horse sense. I am a piker and I admit it.

I'm amazed that there is so little info about the horse camp in the Choccolocco WMA. Horse folks find out about it from each other I suppose. It's always busy. The trails follow the contours, naturally, but there is still a lot of up and down.

The woods in my section are pretty barren, really, especially in the winter time. About 30 miles south it changes, and gets a good deal thicker. Travel would be easy enough, except that you can't go far before you MUST go up or down. You can sidle ridges for only so far. Sneaky terrain!

But this is only theory. You can't leave the trails legally unless you're on foot. And aside from the horse trails, no motorized vehicles, period. That's a good thing.

Well, I ramble. It's off to the garden. I have NO idea what happened this year. We actually got some rain here in dry holler and made a crop.

Thank you thank you 100 times!

Your constant fan,
Norm
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post #8 of 9 Old 07-16-2014, 11:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el norm View Post

i want to give you an extra special compliment. It's getting more rare these days to run across someone who is comfortable writing more than two sentences. Also, it's rare to find someone who'll go the extra mile to help someone else, particularly a stranger. Thus, you're one to ride the river with, as they used to say. gosh, i'm not generally speechless but thank you very much for the kind words

i'm writing a strange little book series. Just got the first one in the can. I'll do three more and start on the next before turning the first four loose.

the action begins 80 years after society collapses. Even though it's set in the future, the whole thing is based on what it was like at the start of the country, circa 1700-1850, more or less. It's sort of a combo fiction/survival thing. Lots of practical info with a good storyline. the series sounds interesting, especially when one finds themselves thrown into a "life after technology" and must learn survival as it may have been at the turn of the last century:-p

now, practically speaking, the lady in the news piece would have been right at home in my future. The trails of the times are the roads and interstates of today. Fences are all rusted and gone for the most part.

so, from what you're telling me, a good strong horse who likes this sort of thing could do the up the hollow down the hollow thing. Jeez. Seems like a dirty trick to play on the critter. I was wondering if it were possible. It is.horses are livestock and were treated as beasts of burden once upon a time. We have gone soft and so have the horses. My first two keeper horses were pretty tough because i rode all the time.

my now 26 yr old tennessee walker has plenty of heart stamina both physically and emotionally but did a lot of things i asked from his heart. He is only 14.3h and scrambled up places some of the bigger horses couldn't. He is the horse in my avatar

my 20 yr old tennessee walker is 16.1h and has the athletic build my arab/saddlebred had. Also tough as nails, the taller/leaner tennessee walker is always up for a challenge but doesn't quite have the work ethic the 27 yr old has.

now, my story is set where i live, so i'm very familiar with the lay of the land. For the most part the trails would serve, but there might come an occasion where a character would need to light out cross country. Jackson and his boys did that very thing in 1812 when they rode from ohatchee to talladega.

i can't tell you how many times we have been out for a drive in the woody woods and i look off the road and try to imagine how difficult it was to get around before the roads were built. What you answered was that yep, a good horse
could do it so if one had one then one wouldn't have to wear out one's mockersons to go visit the neighbors.

of course, the roads are based on indian trails..some of 'em dating back 10,000 years so unless you have a special need to get back in the woods, paths were always available.

i am a woodsman sure, but i gotta tell you...before i got my gps i surely didn't venture far off the track bekez i would surely get turned around. Ha. That and the digital calculator are two of the greatest inventions ever!

in the future i'm constructing, you'd be lucky indeed to have a horse. It's going to be mostly foot. Also, creek and river travel will come back into play big time. All the dams are blown out by this time so with a boat and paddle you can go from the east coast to the rockies if you're of a mind.

horses are my doggone sore spot. I wish i had had more actual experience. You can get only so much from a book. whelllll - lol lol - lucky to have a horse, or not, you can't write about the horse heaving as it gives that last weary thrust of the hind legs after hard steep climb to the top; nor the "blowing" the horse has to be allowed to do in order to get its air back in order to continue on; nor how the smell of the horse's sweat and your nerves fill your nostrils, not knowing what lies ahead as you continue your quest for civil civilization in the new order, unless you go touch a horse or two somewhere
google equine therapy riding, horse rescues, and riding lessons for your area. You might find you're a lot closer to a good horse experience than you realize. Volunteering for just a few hours weekly for a few months, could give you a better depth of understanding
reading on this forum will also be a huge help but you might find actually touching the horse and interacting might be enjoyable and further contribute to the believeability of your books

books allow people to envision and often assimilate themselves into the world they are reading about. If the horse interaction sounds believeable, they will find themselves exhausted from many days of walking, coming upon a horse tangled in the grapevines (we have grapevines, you probably do, as well?) and with limited resources manage to free the equally as exhausted horse, build a never-to-be-broken bond, make their way thru perilous land and water scenarios, and meet friend & foe head-on for whatever is left of the book series

horses were designed to be forage animals, so all the horse of your dreams would need is grass, a fast running creek or river and enough water in your canteen to share with him when water supplies are few and far between.

when i lived in southern california’s low desert, i would carry two 32 ounce bottles of water; one was for my horse who was very adept at drinking from a water bottle. Most of the time he ended up with more than his bottle. He loved sour dough bread but it had to be fresh and he wouldn't eat the crust, i had to. We were in the desert - there wasn't any grass - lol

but you know something? What you have imparted to me follows pretty much exactly what my books have to allow. Only, you're talking fact, and the books are speaking fiction. It's always best to go to the expert and you provide positive verification.

^^^^further to my comments, above:-p

if you're going to involve horses interacting with people to any degree, you should try and get some first hand experience.
for example, kathy lee gifford announced a movie is going to be made about frank gifford, covering his football career up thru 1958. She said whatever actor they pick had better have football experience because there is nothing worse than an actor trying to act out a factual subject he knows nothing about

boy, this must sound pretty dumb. Ha! (a professed outdoorsman who is ignorant of the equine way.) it's just that in my part of the country, there aren't so many horses. It's pretty populous. And country folks don't do horses as much as they could around here. It's more about cows and hay. i know a lot of hunters that only know enough about a horse that it's not hunting material
cows make more money than the same amount of horses - that's how horses got the name "hay burners" many years ago. It was 1951 when we stopped farming with horses. We were some of the last to use horses in our area.
the amish still live the old way, with no electricity and use horses as their utility vehicles. They mostly stay on their respective farms, unless it's the younger ones looking for things they shouldn't be looking for, then they change into "yankee clothes" and manage to get themselves in all kinds of trouble


i'm amazed that there is so little info about the horse camp in the choccolocco wma. Horse folks find out about it from each other i suppose. It's always busy. The trails follow the contours, naturally, but there is still a lot of up and down. 80 or so miles nw of me, one can get on the original natchez trace trail and ride it south for quite a ways. I've only ridden the trails (original and modern day made) close to nashville, tn. Some of that was rougher than i gave credit, considering how close to nashville we were - lol lol

the woods in my section are pretty barren, really, especially in the winter time. About 30 miles south it changes, and gets a good deal thicker. Travel would be easy enough, except that you can't go far before you must go up or down. You can sidle ridges for only so far. Sneaky terrain!

but this is only theory. You can't leave the trails legally unless you're on foot. And aside from the horse trails, no motorized vehicles, period. That's a good thing.

well, i ramble. It's off to the garden. I have no idea what happened this year. We actually got some rain here in dry holler and made a crop.i hope your garden does well we don't grow a garden. Mr. Wtw is a fanatic over "maters". One of the men he works with has a pretty good sized garden and keeps him well supplied with tomatoes. I canned when i was young but long ago burned myself out

we hit 57 last night. While that "record" has been hit five times since 1886, it's still unusual for july in middle tennessee and i'll take it:-p
we're in normal rain mode this year. Last year the pasture grass grew above the tops of the front tires on the farm tractor so often, we bush hogged seven times. Three times is normal - we've got one in and two more to go.

if i could still ride, i'd've loaded a horse this morning and might been gone long to hope the lights on the truck & trailer still work - lol. i would have beseeched mr. Wtw to bring in and feed the other three:-p
--

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.

Last edited by walkinthewalk; 07-16-2014 at 11:30 PM.
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post #9 of 9 Old 07-17-2014, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by El Norm View Post

Like I said, for whatever reason, I just never had any pals with horses. So up until the time I got into my cowboy books I thought a horse was a horse. Afterwards, I got onto THE trick. The critters have personalities! Ha. I just drew a hateful one when I was a tyke. (About like the red haired girl owner.)

Not all red haired owners are hateful. Sorry you ran across one.


I see that you are from Middle Tennessee? That being the case your geography is not all the different from mine. I'm here at the tail end of the Smokies near Mt. Cheaha. Lots of up and down hollows and ridges in the woods.

Before my husband started his present career he worked for the State Parks. Mt Cheaha was his favorite vacation destination. He has yet to bring us there despite all of his tales of grand adventure. Someday....


Suppose you wanted to get from point A to point B in our kind of mountains and you didn't have a trail handy? How would you go about it?

A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail This is an excellent book. It covers walking the trail but could be a wealth of information and a good place to start. It was entertaining as well as informative.



I don't know if it could even be done. That's my question.

I don't see why it couldn't. There was a group that came through here a couple of summers ago that was going cross country on horseback on mustangs. My son has a patch to commemorate the ride as we donated hay when they came through. I used to be able to track their progress online but when my PC crashed I lost the link. The patch says The American History Museum across the top with an American flag and "The Walk" under the flag.

I'm working on a book series that takes place here locally about 80 years or so after society collapses, so it's start all over time. Can they count on horse transport through the untrodden forest or is it to be mostly walking?

I would think if you had a good machete you could get through on horseback if you were proficient in its use. There would be places though where I would imagine you would have to walk through clearing as you go. I used to ride off trail in PA quite a bit. It's been years but I would say no matter where you are riding if you don't know what is ahead being prepared for your most likely need is critical and you would have to be believable. Food for you attainable and carrying water for yourself likely not an issue but providing for a horse is your limiting factor so knowing the terrain and what a horse would eat and how much it would need to maintain the pace you set is the question. I think with some digging you will find what you need. I think the difficulty of care more than getting through the terrain would be the issue you would address. If you are dealing with the collapse of society then some of the infrastructure would be there to be utilized. You could also take some liberties and allow the reader to make some assumptions.

Lately I have been reading about the Creek Indians. A Tennessee man by the name of Jackson made his way here to trade bullets in 1812. I know for a fact that some of the troops had horses and got around without trails on their ride from Ohatchee to Talladega. So it can be done. The book says "with difficulty."

No, I would not be the owner of the handsome Zephyr. He belongs to a lovely woman (user) named Merlot. The two live a world away in New Zealand. Someone provided the link when I first came and it has entertained my family ever since. I currently live in L.A., east of Mobile Bay, north of the Gulf of Mexico and if all the water from the rivers heading out to sea around me were to touch we'd be on an island. As it is I see more than enough through my back yard to consider myself blessed I don't live any closer to the sources. Now that you've got me hooked I'll need to go back and read the entire thread. We hit 64 last night, cooler here in the hollow but 64 is the official record breaking temp for us. The drop in humidity is what makes it all that much more enjoyable.
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