help with deworming - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 06-13-2015, 08:33 PM Thread Starter
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help with deworming

Hi :)
I am new when it comes to dealing with worms, never dealt with them before, even with dogs.
Anyways~~
I saw 2 big white worms in my horses poop on wednesday, the 10th of this month. The lady who owns the place where I board my horse, gave him dewormer for me later that day. So since thursday and friday, white worms everywhere in his poop. Today it's saturday, and in the AM, I couldn't see anything, I think i saw two brown ones that looked pretty dead.
Also my horse is a year and a half old.

My question is, at this point, since he's pushing a lot of them out, should i buy a different dewormer and give it to him in 2 weeks, so the 24th of this month?
I did buy safe-guard power-dose parasite care kit. But I haven't touched it yet. Should I give that to him in 2 weeks? or just hold on to it until he gets worms later in the future...

I do have pics of the worms too

Thank you.

Last edited by augustusmccraethepaint; 06-13-2015 at 08:43 PM.
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post #2 of 18 Old 06-13-2015, 10:06 PM
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when in doubt about worms it is a good idea to have a fecal exam done at the vet's office. This will determine the amount that still might be present and if there might be another type that was not affected by the preparation you first used. In my area this costs $20.00 or less. The type of wormer and the scheduling varies in different areas and different barns.
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post #3 of 18 Old 06-13-2015, 10:09 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Textan49 View Post
when in doubt about worms it is a good idea to have a fecal exam done at the vet's office. This will determine the amount that still might be present and if there might be another type that was not affected by the preparation you first used. In my area this costs $20.00 or less. The type of wormer and the scheduling varies in different areas and different barns.
I will call the vet on monday and see what he says. The problem is, the part of california I am in, there are no near by vet offices, so the vet has to come to the barn. So that will be extra, but not an issue. Rather be safe than sorry. Thank you for replying :)
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post #4 of 18 Old 06-14-2015, 12:19 AM
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If you are seeing "white worms everywhere", let the vet tell you what and how much to worm the horse with.

If he has a big enough worm load, sometimes worming them, even with the recommended dosage, can kill off too many worms and cause the horse to colic and even die in some instances.

You are right, about being "better safe than sorry" ; spending the money for the vet visit, is the better thing.

I hope your BO doesn't take it upon herself to worm your horse. You might want to explain to her that you are waiting for the vet and why:)

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post #5 of 18 Old 06-14-2015, 03:07 AM
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just curious ,you must be in a very remote part of California for no Vet to be around or near.
I know some of the more remote small mountain towns do not have a Vet in the town but there are Vets in the larger towns and it would probably be cheaper to haul a horse in then pay the ranch call fee. Maybe if other people need the Vet out you can split the call out fees.

Was the first dose the safe guard ? I would wait at least 30 days before giving him another regular dose . The power dose can kill a large worm load at once as stated before and have bad consequences. You can collect poop off the top of the pile when it is fresh and grab it up in a rubber glove or plastic zip lock bag, turn the bag inside out put on like a mitten grab a good handfull, pull the bag over the poo and zip it up, take it to the Vets to be examined.
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post #6 of 18 Old 06-14-2015, 03:14 AM
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Definitely consult a vet. If you have a relationship with a vet already, you may be able to call their office and get advice over the phone. If not, have one come out and start building that relationship now!

IIRC, young horses are more susceptible to worms and need more frequent worming than mature horses. Your vet will be able to help you figure out an effective worming routine!

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post #7 of 18 Old 06-14-2015, 03:33 AM
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You might also be able to send in a fecal sample for testing at a lab...I'm pretty sure UC Davis does that.

It's been a while since I researched this stuff, but IIRC white worms in poop are usually tapeworms...I'm pretty sure I read something about putting neem oil under the horse's tail which either kills or prevents the worms from laying more eggs...? Now that I type it out, it sounds weird, lol. But you might want to check it out for yourself. :)

If you have a microscope and the appropriate accessories, you can learn to do your own fecal egg counts. Just Google it and you'll find instructions and reference photos of worm eggs. I'm not saying you should forego a professional test, but it might be worth it to get comfortable doing it yourself so you can keep tabs on your young horse. :)

Happy trails!
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post #8 of 18 Old 06-15-2015, 11:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augustusmccraethepaint View Post
The lady who owns the place where I board my horse, gave him dewormer for me later that day.
I endorse all the suggestions to have your vet do a fecal exam. But the fundamental question is, where did your horse get worms? Did it happen before or after your horse arrived at the present location?

If your horse achieved that kind of a worm load at the present facility, there is a problem with how it is managed.
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post #9 of 18 Old 06-15-2015, 01:03 PM
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They're most likely to be Roundworms - horses under 3 years seem to be more susceptible to them and they're rarely ever seen in older horses
Tapeworm have a segmented look to them and often come out broken up into these small segments and look less like a typical worm
Heavy infestations ban cause blockages and colic so you do need to get on top of the problem
Your horse is picking up the eggs from the pasture so maybe their management practices need re-thinking?
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post #10 of 18 Old 06-15-2015, 01:08 PM
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Second the vet statement!
Plus, the vet can worm your horse for you... they will give your horse the proper amount for its weight/age/the amount of worms it has. Much better than an "over the counter" wormer.

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