help with deworming - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 18 Old 06-15-2015, 03:30 PM
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The fact that the horse picked up worms isn't necessarily an indication of poor management practices. All horses are exposed to worms, no matter how careful you are. Deworming is about keeping worm levels low, not at zero.

Mature horses can be classified as either low shedders or high shedders- low shedders tend to have a higher natural resistance to worms and have FECs that come back zero or low and can be dewormed less frequently (but still need to be dewormed regularly!). High shedders don't seem to have as good a natural resistance and have to be dewormed more regularly (perhaps also with follow up FECs to ensure the program is effective). Young horses under the age of 2 (or 3, depending on which literature you're reading) should all be treated as high shedders. It's best to consult with a vet to establish a deworming program that includes FECs for all horses, but especially so with high shedders.
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post #12 of 18 Old 06-15-2015, 03:48 PM
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As Jaydee says, it sounds as if they are round worms, ascaris, which young horses are particularly prone to.

Depending on wha wormer you used, I would repeat in four to six weeks with a broad spectrum wormer.
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post #13 of 18 Old 06-15-2015, 09:50 PM
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There is absolutely not reason to deworm again in 2 weeks.

Right now, you need to get the name of the product the lady at the barn gave and then discuss a reasonable fecal testing and deworming program for your horse based upon age, environment and pasture/stall situation.

At this point, a fecal egg count would be of very limited value. You need to run fecal egg counts at an appropriate time AFTER deworming to determine what kind of parasite load your horse normally carries to help you determine how many times a year your horse needs to be dewormed. The amount of time you wait to run a fecal egg count depends on what drug you used last. Could you post the name of the product? Is your horse in a pasture or stall? How old is your horse?

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post #14 of 18 Old 06-15-2015, 11:14 PM
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The long white ones are usually Strongyles. Probably best to give his system a chance to recover and wait until a month has passed. That is the time to take a new fresh sample into the vet. Your horse will start looking better in a few weeks now that you're not feeding a big load of worms.



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post #15 of 18 Old 06-16-2015, 02:31 AM
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young horses are very susceptible to ascarids (round worms )
Older horses develop some resistence to round worms
Here is some info on ascarids

Roundworms, Equine

Be careful in horses that have a heavy ascarid infection, as if a large number of those worms are killed off at on etime, you can cause a bowel obstruction
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post #16 of 18 Old 06-16-2015, 02:32 AM
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The long white ones are usually Strongyles. Probably best to give his system a chance to recover and wait until a month has passed. That is the time to take a new fresh sample into the vet. Your horse will start looking better in a few weeks now that you're not feeding a big load of worms.
No, they are ascarids (round worms )

Strongles, even the large ones are no where near the size of round worms, and are red
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post #17 of 18 Old 06-16-2015, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
The long white ones are usually Strongyles. Probably best to give his system a chance to recover and wait until a month has passed. That is the time to take a new fresh sample into the vet. Your horse will start looking better in a few weeks now that you're not feeding a big load of worms.
The long white worms are not usually strongyles. They are ascarids (roundworms). Large strongyles are rarely an issue since the advent of ivermectin as a routine deworming product for horses and small strongyles are small and red.

Ascarids (roundworms) are generally a problem only in young horses or horses with a compromised immune system (including horses that are very old).

Again, timing for rechecking a fecal sample will depend on the last drug used. 4 weeks is not an appropriate time period, in general.
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post #18 of 18 Old 06-20-2015, 12:29 AM
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You can involve a Vet if you like, but it is just easier and more practical to assume that young horses have parasites (particularly roundworms) and deworm every 6 to 8 weeks. A horse from 3 months to 3 years of age is the most prone to parasites, particularly round worms). We have found Anthelcide and Safe Guard to be more effective against round worms than Ivermectin. We use Ivermectin at least twice every winter and early spring and use the previously mentioned ones other times for young horses.

We have done several postmortem exams on horses from 4 months of age up to 18 months of age that died from round worm loads. I personally filled a 5 gallon bucket (NOT before running out of worms) and I just quit. This was when a good friend found a dead 6 month old foal. It was the second foal they had found dead that year -- both sired by one of my stallions. I had repeatedly recommended that they should start deworming their foals earlier. After they lost a second slick, fat baby, I went to their ranch and did a postmortem on the foal and filled a 5 gallon bucket with round worms, many that were more than a foot long and as big around as my finger and looked like white snakes.

People often associate heavy worm loads with poor, thin, pot-bellied scruffy looking horses that have been neglected and poorly cared for. The truth is that I have seen more horses that died from their parasite loads that were slick, fat and otherwise, well cared for. The young horses have died from round worms and the older horses died from strongyles and complications like colic. Almost all of these young horses were slick and fat. If you feed the young horse well, you are also feeding the worms well and they get HUGE.

Once a new horse has been initially dewormed, then, a fecal exam is in order although horses can have a moderate worm load and not be shedding eggs when they are checked. With horses under 3 or 4 years of age, it is just most effective to deworm them regularly. They probably have worms, especially if they are on a property that has had many horses on it over the years. It is not necessary (or even advisable) to use heavy duty deworming plans (like Power Packs) on young horses. Round worms kill easily and and are going to come back no matter what you do. Just treat for them.
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