Help Me Fill My Tack Trunk - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 07-01-2020, 01:15 PM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: New England
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Help Me Fill My Tack Trunk

As a fun spin-off to my "Taking the Leap Into Ownership" thread, I wanted to get some thoughts on what to buy to prepare for my eventual pony! (No - don't get too excited, I don't know for sure who my first pony will be yet. But it's only a matter of time and my favorite online horse tack store has a big July 4th sale.)

Most of the things I need to wait to see what size pony I end up with before I can buy: Bridle (and reins that match), bit, girth, saddle (if mine doesn't fit), grazing muzzle if needed, rain sheet, winter blanket (no rush)

Other things, I want to wait and see the color of the pony to be fun and match-y: Halter, lead rope

But there are some things I'd like to get ready:
-Fly spray: Tell me your favorite brand and why!
-First aid kit: Anything not typical to first aid kids you've found useful?
-Grooming supplies: Favorite shampoo/conditioner/detangler? Anything not typical that you like?
-Hoof oil?
-Treats
-Lunge line
-A trunk to keep it all in (no tack lockers or cubbies at the barn)

(I already have: typical grooming brushes/hoof picks, saddle pads. The boarding barn will provide everything needed for feeding/water.)

Am I forgetting anything? I think I'm particularly interested in your experiences with certain brands or non-typical but extremely useful things you've come across.
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IRideaHippogriff is offline  
post #2 of 8 Old 07-01-2020, 04:18 PM
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I think products to use such as shampoo and such are a personal preference thing and what agrees with your horses coat and skin...some products cause issues for some animals and not others.
I don't use hoof oils anymore...beauty and gleam come from good nutrition and many things you paint on actually dry out or hinder the hooves ability to breathe and absorb/shed moisture as the elements demand and need.
I started out with simple brushes to clean my horses... A soft brush, a hard or mud brush, hoofpick brush combo, a sweat scraper. I bought a car wash sponge and bucket from Walmart for washing the horse.
To this day my brushes cost me less than $10 per and do a fine job. I can see some having great fun spending 3x that amount for 1 brush but I truly don't see the point in spending oodles...clean is clean when you know how to apply elbow grease appropriately.
This is honestly where I buy much of my equipment as it is affordable, entry level quality that gives years of service without breaking the bank financially. https://www.chicksaddlery.com/horse-grooming-aids
From halters and shanks, brushes, saddle pads and honestly some of the saddles are not bad either...I've had lessons sitting in some of those saddles many years ago and they were safe, comfortable and assisted you with position proper for a realistic price paid.
Other places I've spent much time looking at and many dollars purchasing from is https://www.statelinetack.com/
and www.jeffersequine.com
Great places to find value and approximate costs of items for reference before spending to much or knowing when to spend now for a great deal..
Neither of these places offer top of the line but you don't need that honestly, you need everyday serviceable quality to start your adventure with...you have years to upgrade and get into the fad items that cost so much.

I don't do "treats" as in buy them, I don't.
Our horses will get apple cores when I'm done snacking on a apple if trail riding, sliced apple or carrot but I don't buy cookies or packaged treats...just don't spend my money that way.
Once in a while a alfalfa cube broke into thin slivers as my one horse has choked and not going down that path ever again I hope...otherwise, no commercial or bought treats.

So, the one thing I will say you must have is a secure locking trunk/cabinet large enough to store your barn needs in.
For now something like a foot locker you can get in Target, Big Lots will work to get you started.
Be careful of the quality some of those cheapies are cause if in a barn it does take some abuse and banged around just cause it happens so make your purchase stronger than bottom of the barrel cheap but not costing...crazy!
I've seen some nice stuff come from Home Depot too...do look around.
Depending upon barn security for tack, bring your saddle back & forth in the car/truck daily.

Eventually though most expand their collection of acquired stuff and need more space and with more space needed so does the appearance of said product equally improve and get fancy.
Pinterest has hundreds of choices of "to make" designs and after looking at and drooling over the fancy you get a feeling for what you want yourself.
My husband made me some gorgeous huge trunks, free-standing for a fraction of what places sell already constructed/made for. I sold mine when no longer had horses where we previously lived, and even today at my home they would be unnecessary as no one steals so no need to keep under lock and key...

At my home I have plastic Rubbermaid totes with snap on lids that stack with blankets and sheets neatly stored inside. Another tote holds saddle pads... I write with sharpie markers on the sides what is contained inside.
I have other totes with excess, to much excess as I'm hoarder and seldom throw anything horsey away if not "junk"

I found in a pawn shop for $20 a trunk like the first picture below, it is one of the really top quality expensive ones the horse racing and English riding elite barns require all students to have and match...
These examples below I found on Dover's website www.doversaddlery.com
The second one is affordable and looks sturdy enough to hold plenty and secure so no roving fingers help themselves to your things...
The first one is gorgeous but not so affordable for many.


I've seen some nice trunks from Home Depot too...all with locking abilities.
When you figure out by seeing some others and examples around making your own is fun to design and personalize. Pinterest and Etsy have thousands of blueprints and ideas along with the pieces you need to finish them to very handy to have, can't find it anywhere hardware items.

We all start someplace and over time increase in amount what we have and then need to store so we get inventive and "wanting"...
Start though with what you need now, is in the budget and can safely keep your items clean, together and safe...then dream and fill those dreams in years to come.
Happy shopping.

...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #3 of 8 Old 07-01-2020, 06:21 PM
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Join Date: May 2020
Location: Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IRideaHippogriff View Post
As a fun spin-off to my "Taking the Leap Into Ownership" thread, I wanted to get some thoughts on what to buy to prepare for my eventual pony! (No - don't get too excited, I don't know for sure who my first pony will be yet. But it's only a matter of time and my favorite online horse tack store has a big July 4th sale.)

Most of the things I need to wait to see what size pony I end up with before I can buy: Bridle (and reins that match), bit, girth, saddle (if mine doesn't fit), grazing muzzle if needed, rain sheet, winter blanket (no rush)

Other things, I want to wait and see the color of the pony to be fun and match-y: Halter, lead rope

But there are some things I'd like to get ready:
-Fly spray: Tell me your favorite brand and why!
-First aid kit: Anything not typical to first aid kids you've found useful?
-Grooming supplies: Favorite shampoo/conditioner/detangler? Anything not typical that you like?
-Hoof oil?
-Treats
-Lunge line
-A trunk to keep it all in (no tack lockers or cubbies at the barn)

(I already have: typical grooming brushes/hoof picks, saddle pads. The boarding barn will provide everything needed for feeding/water.)

Am I forgetting anything? I think I'm particularly interested in your experiences with certain brands or non-typical but extremely useful things you've come across.
Fly spray: Currently I use Farnam Nature's Defense. It's water based, so it comes off easily, only repels, but it works for my sensitive skin Friesian! The flys/bugs still get after him and I frequently reapply. I've got a couple other brands (EcoVet + Eqyss Barn Barrier) but I'm a little reluctant since my horse isn't reacting to the Nature's Defense.



First aid kit: I've acquired most of my stuff from working a Veterinary clinic, but, I've been curious to try the Effol brand first aid kit...maybe you would be too.


Grooming supplies: A rubber curry that fits nicely into my hand. A stiff dandy brush. A comb. All essential to me. My stuff is really old, I don't know the name brands because they've rubbed off. Cheap stuff works just fine! If you're looking for some really luxe brushes though, head over to Dressage Extensions where you can find super premium brushes! Have always loved White 'n' Brite shampoo and have had really good results with Eqyss Micro-Tek shampoo.



Hoof oil: I don't use hoof oil, but when I was helping groom/prepare horses for keurings, we used Rain Maker and it did a good job.


Treats: Not a big treat giver, however if I do I make my own! One year I grew sugar beets and shredded them into a treat recipe. The shredding was hard but the horses loved them. Another kind that had mini treats that I really liked I think was called Apple Wafers. Can't remember exactly the name. It came as a free sample in my rice bran last year.


Lunge line: I prefer cotton that has a snap and no chain. I've tried these padded nylon ones, and didn't like them, I couldn't let the line slip through my hands as freely.



Tack cleaning: I've always been a traditionalist and used a glycerine bar, however, for my birthday this year I changed it up and bought MOSS Saddle soap in citrus basil scent. I really love it! Definitely recommend. I also really like the Effax products too.
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post #4 of 8 Old 07-01-2020, 08:08 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
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Of all the fly sprays I have used, Wipe was my favorite. You literally wipe it on (great for the horses who don't like spray) and it really does work. For a while, anyway. The problem with sprays is that half of it ends up on the ground. I bought a bunch of face cloths and keep one on the bottle of Wipe so we can re-use it until it gets filthy. It gets really saturated with Wipe so it's easy to get good coverage on the horses. Now THERE'S a useful item people often overlook - face cloth and towels for spot washing, drying after a bath in winter, and many other little things you need them for - wiping down a wet saddle when you get caught in the rain, wiping your hands!

Our favorite saddle cleaner is Passier Lederbalsam. It's a two-step system, but I swear, it will keep your tack in top shape and looking amazing. We like to clean and condition our saddles while watching tv in the evening sometimes. Love the smell of freshly conditioned leather in my living room, lol.

I like to keep a few little treats for training, but I make them myself and cut them in really tiny pieces. Zero sugar! I mix about 4 cups of ground flax, half a cup or a little more of unsweetened applesauce, and a couple of tbsp of cinnamon, slather it onto a baking sheet covered in parchment paper, and cook at about 375 F for about an hour. I precut the mix before I bake so all I have to do is let it cool and snap them apart. Horses love them! They freeze well too.

Lots of things to keep in your first aid kit, but one item that might not spring to mind immediately is baby diapers. They are great to wrap around a hoof to soak it or protect a wound from dirt. Duct tape over the velcro tabs hold it together. So yeah, duct tape :) A thermometer. Some wound dressing (Bag balm is a good all-around balm). No thrush or something similar, because almost every horse will get a touch of thrush at certain times of the year. Swat to apply on bug bites.

I feel like most other things will be specific to the horse you buy.
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post #5 of 8 Old 07-02-2020, 10:19 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2019
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What I have in my tack trunk:

Sharpies/pens - for labeling

Duct tape and masking tape

Scissors

Leather hole punch - for nay adjustments needed for tack

Tack cleaner - I like to not have spray bottles laying in my trunk incase of spill, I have wipes

Hand towels and 1-2 bath towels - Never know when you need these!

Personal Items -
* Feminine hygiene products, always need those for "Surprise" times.
* Lip care, Band-Aids, spare phone charger,
* Emergency contact lists for myself and my horse

Extra halter and lead rope

Lunge line

I keep things I want to keep clean bagged up for special outings (clinic lessons/shows) such as saddle pad, polo wrap or boots and or show sheet.

When I am out of town I may put my extra made up grain bags in my trunk for safe storage.



When going to a show I pack it with: all my grooming supplies, bridle, extra reins (never know when they may break) Back up bits, lunge line, bagged up clean saddle pads for each day of showing or different disciplines. Gloves, emergncy suppliments such as banamine, electrolytes, bute etc.

Arc De Triumphe 5 Yr TB B GMillie 26 YR Morgan/QH B M "
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post #6 of 8 Old 07-02-2020, 12:35 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Lansing, Michigan
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On the topic of fly-spray, how bad are the flies in your area? I'm quickly becoming a non-believer in fly repellents and fly masks, just because they get pretty costly, and most horses will just deal with the flies on their own. When I moved to my new barn, I was told that the flies were super bad, and I bought 2 bottles of "ProZap Fly-Die Ultra" and fly masks. Well, well, well, super bad flies at my new barn are what my old barn considered barely any flies. My horses ripped and destroyed their fly masks in less than a week, and only get fly spray put on when I notice my sensitive mare with more-than-usual fly bites.

BUT, if you get the little, bitey, black gnats that latch on and suck blood from the inside of horses ears, around their sheaths/teats, under their chin, and on their chest, the secret answer to those instead of fly spray is Vapor Rubs/Bag Balms. Lather it on thick, and the little gnats will get stuck in it and die if they try to latch on. I get whatever is cheapest at the dollar store.

As for first-aid kits, I just walked out to my car and grabbed the first-aid kit I bring absolutely everywhere. It covers humans, horses, and dogs. Here are it's contents:
- Thrush Buster and soon Thrush Off as it's replacement
- Clear Eyes Eye Drops, for horses, but suitable for humans and dogs too
- Animaltex Hoof Poultice
- Multiple Rolls of Vet-Wrap
- Duct Tape
- Petroleum Jelly
- Thermometer and Cleaning Wipes
- Tubes from a women's Yeast Infection medication kit (medication application in puncture wounds)
- Rubber gloves, mainly for working on other humans (bloodborne illnesses are no joke!)
- Many tubes of triple antibiotic
- Human Band-aids
- Tampons (menstrual cycle and also wounds in a pinch)
- Benadryl with dosing instructions for my dog and horses
- Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen
- Anti-histamine other than Benadryl (Benadryl puts me to sleep)
- Antacids
- Sterile Large Gauze Pads
- Sterile Rolls of Gauze
- Flashlight
- First-Aid Notebooks from the courses I've taken (Wilderness First Aid and Equi-First Aid)
- A list of "normal" vitals for horse, human, and dog

Things I am missing currently:
- A list of emergency vet numbers for dog and horse
- Cotton-batting for large horse wounds
- Banamine
- Tubes of Electro-lyte Paste
- Dormosedan Gel (a sedative paste for horses)
- Iodine
- Scissors

However, a first-aid kit is only as useful as the person who has it. I hugely recommend finding and taking a first-aid course if you want to carrying and know how to use a first-aid kit in an emergency. I took the "Wilderness First Responder" 40 hour course, as I am a backpacker, and the "Equi-First Aid USA" 8 hour course, as I have horses. Many of the first aid courses offered by the American Red Cross are a good starting point to get an idea of how to do things. I also took their course.

Also, if you live in a remote area, please, please, please, make sure you know someone that owns a gun and knows how to euthanize a horse with it. I was in a situation last year where a horse was actively dying, and to get a vet out on an emergency call takes 3+ hours, usually over a day. We had someone that could do it. It's an important thing to consider.

He's Ultimately Fine - Toofine - 1998 Half Arabian
Wilhelmina - Minnie - 2013 Morgan
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post #7 of 8 Old 07-02-2020, 04:25 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2012
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Fly Spray - the only one that I have found that works really well is the yellow Pyranha spray. If you are set on using a "natural" spray Pyranha green is the best one I have ever found and works almost as well as a toxic chemical spray during low bug times (early spring/fall) but, of course, results vary based on location, fly species, etc. I also have to recommend Swat ointment for faces/ears, and I'll often apply it on Nav's belly, between back legs, near sheath, etc. to keep flys at bay for longer than the spray will.

First Aid - ClearDonkey gave great advice. I would add a package of diapers or extra long pads, they work really well for wrapping a hoof while treating an abscess. Sunscreen - for yourself but also if your horse has any white, especially on their nose. Triple antibiotic ointment.

Grooming supplies - I don't have anything super fancy, still have the old brushes I got way back when I started riding and got my own grooming kit. Sometime in the last few years I got a currying mitt with teeth on one side and metal balls on the other, so I can use it to groom or massage Nav. He seems to like the massage balls, and the curry works well enough. Recently got a SleekEZ for shedding out and it works well but my old shedding blade works essentially as well. I feel like there are a lot of "faddy" grooming supplies out there, so you can either stick to what you know works, or now and then try one of the new things to see for yourself.

No recs. for hoof oil or treats.

Lunge line - mine is just a plain cotton with a snap on the end. Relatively inexpensive, nothing special, and I don't think you really need anything more than that. I couldn't even tell you the brand, but I think I got it from tractor supply.

Trunk - I got mine from Home Depot, it's a Husky brand big tool chest with wheels. It's big but not quite enough room for all of my horse stuff. My grooming things can fit into it as well as first aid, but none of my tack can, so something to consider.
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post #8 of 8 Old 07-03-2020, 10:44 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: New England
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Wow everyone - this is INVALUABLE stuff. Thank you a million times over! I am reading it all over and absorbing and expanding my shopping list!
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