herd leader problem - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 21 Old 01-27-2016, 09:01 PM
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I don't know what method you used, but I read Clinton Anderson's Downunder Horsemanship and it had a lot of really great groundwork exercises. I know he's a bit controversial, but you gotta start somewhere. :)
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post #12 of 21 Old 01-27-2016, 09:19 PM
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I have only had my horses for close to a year but for them to trust me I just spend a lot of time with them. I also try to always be the boss.
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post #13 of 21 Old 01-27-2016, 10:58 PM
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Trust and respect are two very difference concepts. In the round pen if a horse turns his head away when turning, that's a lack of respect. You need to learn how to use your body to control his movement so he turns toward you. When he turns rump to you those legs are two pile-drivers that could end your life.



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post #14 of 21 Old 01-27-2016, 11:48 PM
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I do rescue so I get alot of horses that have been abused or neglected and trust doesnt come easy with them. I grain them and let them come to me on their own within a week after talking to them, reassuring them and them seeing the others get love and affection, they start trusting me to let me pet them.. its baby steps.. within a few weeks i can halter them no problem.even ones that arent handled. just dont force yourself on them as you dont know what theyve been thru. good luck
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post #15 of 21 Old 01-28-2016, 03:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saranda View Post
Care to share what technique is that?
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Yeah the Trust technique by James French
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post #16 of 21 Old 01-30-2016, 12:33 PM
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Decide whether you or your horse will be the leader because someone has to be. If that's you (and I hope it is), do a LOT of round pen work, including join-up (Monty Roberts). Tons of videos on youtube. The main point of join-up is establishing trust with your horse, so that he sees you as the alpha in the "herd" of him and you. Also, learn to move his feet. When you move his feet, especially his hind quarters, you are in control. A horse's instinct is to preserve his energy as much as possible since they are prey animals and need to be prepared to escape danger. When you move his feet, you are communicating to him you are the leader. It doesn't have to be a huge movement, just a few steps. For example, when I am leading my horse to the pasture or ring, he always tries to eat and he is VERY sneaky about it. I use the word, break, and step around and use my long lead rope to tap his hind quarters. Now, I don't have to tap at all. When I say break, he stops. When I say, release, he knows he is permitted. I strongly believe in a give and take relationship and I am stern and consistent, but also reward when he deserves it and when I can.
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post #17 of 21 Old 01-30-2016, 02:07 PM
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Giddyup, how do you know the horses have been neglected or abused. Have you witnessed this? Horses read people in a heartbeat. If a horse ran away from you when trying to catch it, I could tell people you must have abused it. But no, I'd tell people he's outsmarting you. You bring goodies, he's smart enough to tolerate your touching. Try going to him empty handed carrying a rope. If he walks off, start following him at a speed that will keep him walking. Every time he stops, wiggle the rope and get him moving. Don't quit, keep it up until he turns to face you with both eyes. Then turn your back and wait. He may approach and this is what you want.



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post #18 of 21 Old 01-30-2016, 02:28 PM
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Trust is earned.

I don't get this focus on trust. When I am handling a horse I don't know I sure don't trust THEM!!

Why do they need to trust you?
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post #19 of 21 Old 01-30-2016, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILHorses View Post
Hi! I just got my horse and he is great except that i have a problem getting his trust. any techniques i could use with him to gain his trust and make a good bond?
trust comes after respect
If you are a clear, fair leader, the horse will learn to trust you. in is in their very basic nature to do so
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post #20 of 21 Old 02-01-2016, 10:08 PM
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I agree with those who say trust takes time. It isn't something I specifically focus on even with an especially shy or spooky horse. In fact, I find the more I can just treat a nervous horse like he's Old Reliable, the more quickly he starts acting like an Old Reliable!
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