The horrible dishonest people out there - The Horse Forum
 120Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 41 Old 09-05-2014, 09:29 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 26
• Horses: 1
Exclamation The horrible dishonest people out there

I am from Australia. I am only pretty much a beginner, but I have already had to find out the hard way how difficult it is to find a decent horse.

Dad thought it was the same as when he was a kid: if a horse was said to be quiet, then it was. So he went and bought me a "quiet" pony (at least it was at first). When we brought it home, it went mad, threw me 3 times, and I ended up with a total nervous problem the minute I thought of riding a horse. Dad tried to calm Misty down by riding her up and down the hills a lot. It didn't work; she bucked him off 3 times and nearly rolled on him once. So we sold her to an experienced horse lady. It was then that we realised she was drugged.

Then Dad tried again. He bought me a pony with a quiet nature, who was NOT drugged this time. Instead, the minute he ate some grass, he went crazy and bucked Dad off and ran off. He was just hungry and it took a bit of grass to show his true colours. Back to the dealer it went.

Another horse we looked at would not stop, and another was not used to stock saddles and went crazy.

Eventually our neighbour put us onto a beautiful little mare who I now own proudly.

Post has a point:
PLEASE, if you are selling a horse, be honest about the rider needed, and about its vices. It is dangerous to sell a horse falsely. If you have similar information about bad sellers or horses, please add to this thread.
MouseZ, bkylem and Dakota23 like this.

Last edited by Wallaby; 09-05-2014 at 06:05 PM. Reason: removing personal details
Delta Dawn is my girl is offline  
post #2 of 41 Old 09-05-2014, 04:23 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: I'm an American girl living in southwest France
Posts: 1,563
• Horses: 6
Too many people have bad horses that they don't train and then just want to get rid of them. And as you've learned, they'll lie their butts off to be rid of the problem they most likely caused. Who loses in the end? The horses. It's very sad. I'm glad you found a good one eventually!

“When I bestride him, I soar, I am a hawk: he trots the air; the earth sings when he touches it; the basest horn of his hoof is more musical than the pipe of Hermes. ” ~ William Shakespeare
ecasey is offline  
post #3 of 41 Old 09-05-2014, 04:43 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Virgin, UT (Near Zion)
Posts: 358
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delta Dawn is my girl View Post
I am from Australia. I am only pretty much a beginner, but I have already had to find out the hard way how difficult it is to find a decent horse.

Dad thought it was the same as when he was a kid: if a horse was said to be quiet, then it was. So he went and bought me a "quiet" pony (at least it was at first). When we brought it home, it went mad, threw me 3 times, and I ended up with a total nervous problem the minute I thought of riding a horse. Dad tried to calm Misty down by riding her up and down the hills a lot. It didn't work; she bucked him off 3 times and nearly rolled on him once. So we sold her to an experienced horse lady. It was then that we realised she was drugged.

Then Dad tried again. He bought me a pony with a quiet nature, who was NOT drugged this time. Instead, the minute he ate some grass, he went crazy and bucked Dad off and ran off. He was just hungry and it took a bit of grass to show his true colours. Back to the dealer it went.

Another horse we looked at would not stop, and another was not used to stock saddles and went crazy.

Eventually our neighbour put us onto a beautiful little mare who I now own proudly.

Post has a point:
PLEASE, if you are selling a horse, be honest about the rider needed, and about its vices. It is dangerous to sell a horse falsely. If you have similar information about bad sellers or horses, please add to this thread.

This is one of those lessons in life. Don't loose faith, there are lots of good folks out there too.
bluethehuman likes this.

Last edited by Wallaby; 09-06-2014 at 01:54 AM. Reason: editing quote to remove personal details
STT GUY is offline  
post #4 of 41 Old 09-05-2014, 08:23 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: NYS
Posts: 144
• Horses: 3
The best way to combat that when on the market for a horse is to educate yourself.
beverleyy likes this.
ManeEquinessence is offline  
post #5 of 41 Old 09-05-2014, 09:01 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 20,521
• Horses: 0
Hi & welcome,

I'm glad you finally found yourself a good horse. Sad(but so common) to hear about your experiences, and yes, there are some dishonest(and many honest but ignorant) people out there who pass on problems.

But respectfully, also do consider that what you've written doesn't *necessarily* add up to seller dishonesty at all. Inexperienced people also commonly *cause* horses to become 'problems', because horses learn to do what works for them. They quickly work out they don't have to behave the same for a novice as for an experienced person. For eg I have no hesitation in saying being hungry & having a bite of grass was absolutely nothing to do with the second pony's behaviour change.

Pain & fear in a horse are also a common cause of 'bad behaviour', for eg. if the saddle didn't fit your Misty, or your dad was too heavy for her, or some such. And horses being prey animals, are naturally nervous in strange/new situations, without a *respected* leader & can be very reactive if they're not feeling secure. So if you don't know how to become your horse's respected, trusted leader, they're also inclined to be edgy, reactive, and frequently, try to take charge themselves - there's got to be a leader, and if you can't/won't be it...

So... while you have a good horse now, I would highly advise, if you're not already doing so, to get some lessons with a good instructor, so you can learn how to establish & keep that good behaviour/attitude/relationship with your horse, and minimise chances of problems.
loosie is offline  
post #6 of 41 Old 09-05-2014, 09:15 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: TX
Posts: 526
• Horses: 2
You speak/type so maturely! I am impressed. Good on you. I just had to point that out!

I'm glad you finally got the right horse for you. I've seen those situations as well. Nobody wants to be upfront about their problem horses.
Posted via Mobile Device
loosie, smrobs and Dakota23 like this.
SummerShy is offline  
post #7 of 41 Old 09-06-2014, 01:51 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 26
• Horses: 1
I also realise now that some sellers out there genuinely think their horses are really good. Our friends went to look at a pony for their little girl and the seller thought that her horse was great, and safe, when in fact it was bucking, rearing, had bad manners and all the rest. But the woman owned this horse for pretty much all her life, and had not had much experience with truly good horses. That's why she learnt to ride well, by falling off. She did not really know that you could get quiet kids horses, and this was the horse she had since she was young. Our friends were quite amazed by the fact that she did not realise the problems her horse had.

Also, in reply to some earlier posts, I have just about devoured the school and town library in search for horse books. I am starting lessons Monday, and I drive everyone in our area mad with questions. :)
Delta Dawn is my girl is offline  
post #8 of 41 Old 09-06-2014, 03:24 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 15,139
• Horses: 0
Welcome.

I have bought and sold many horses and ponies over the years. At one point I was doing nothing but buying imported horses and ponies from Ireland and selling them in England.

I always tried to sell honestly. If a horse had a problem then I would say so. I would also always take a horse back. Not necessarily for the price it was sold for but I would always take it back.

There is a saying in the UK which stands well in court. "Caveat Emptor" which means "buyer beware" Any horse being sold should be open for a fair test, if a vendor will not let you trial the horse then walk away.

I have also sold many which people were very happy with then hot upon problems. I well recall one woman calling me to say that the pony she had bought was impossible to clip. she couldn't even get into the stable with the clippers running, I couldn't believe this as he had always been easy to clip out. I went to see. He was in the stable, I put the clippers on and he freaked out. I picked up my twitch, whacked him hard on the backside twice, tied him up and proceeded to clip him without him moving a muscle, standing relaxed and loose when I did his head.
He was just trying things on. I knew this and told him otherwise,
My point being that he was getting away with little things with his new owners and was seeing how far he could go.

It is not always the vendors fault when a horse sold misbehaves. It can be because the new owners do not recognise when the animal is starting to get away with little things and this can lead to major problems.

Of course there are always dishonest people selling horses too.
Foxhunter is offline  
post #9 of 41 Old 09-06-2014, 05:14 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 26
• Horses: 1
Thanks SummerShy. :) It is so difficult either way. The sellers are in trouble if the new owners let the horse go bad and don't discipline it, but the buyers are in trouble if the owners are dishonest. its bad nowadays. So glad I have Delta!!
Delta Dawn is my girl is offline  
post #10 of 41 Old 09-08-2014, 05:58 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: waaaayyy up North
Posts: 67
• Horses: 2
I'm an older beginner, slowly learning over the past 2 years. Since I've got into the horse world I have met the most dishonest people I've ever met in my life. I've never seen so much lying and cheating. They should be ashamed of themselves!

That being said, I think the label "beginner safe" is very misleading. For instance, some might say my gelding is "beginner safe." He's 12 years old and has a reputation for being a plug/deadhead. He doesn't buck, rear, kick or bite, walks trots and canters (once he trusts a person), knows all his commands etc. I didn't feel safe or confident with him, though. He kept hitting me in the stomach with his head, HARD! He would refuse to lead when I went to get him out of the pasture, go back to the barn as if he was barn sour when I took him for a trail ride, refuse to pick up his feet for me etc, etc. Finally I was ready to sell him but decided to go ahead and give lessons a whirl. The trainer wasn't there for 30 seconds before she said "I see you have a big pushy gelding there!" and she spent about an hour showing me how to deal with a horse being bossy with his head, and lead him properly and confidently. Then she spent about an hour showing me how to get him to pick up his feet and clean them correctly and, most importantly, put them down gently. I had no idea you couldn't just drop a horse's hoof back down. She taught me how to establish a regular routine with him, doing the same things in the same order each time I brought him in - and a lot of other things I needed to do to give him trust and confidence in me. She told me he will test his boundaries and take advantage whenever he gets a chance, but showed me how to keep him from doing it. We've had three lessons and now I'm taking him out on trail rides alone and really enjoying him. He still tests me sometimes but he's learning that I'm not a pushover and every time I'm with him he behaves better. I feel safe with him and we're both having fun and getting to know one another. Now - I'm still a beginner and he's doing good for me, but does that make him "beginner safe?"

Another example is my friend's grandson's pony. The grandson is six and has been riding her since he was four. That pony is perfect for him. He can walk out in the pasture and catch her without a problem. She is as still as a stone when he gets on her and really watches out for him when he's on her back, doesn't do anything that might cause him to lose his balance or fall. He "barrel raced" her at a county fair which I guess was extremely cute. She hates adults, though! She's awful for me - won't let adults catch her, pitches fits. I went to saddle her up and she pitched a fit while she was tied, pulled back so hard she broke her halter. She doesn't want to lead, etc. From what I hear she's that way with all adults. So - could you call her "beginner safe?"
VickiRose likes this.
fffarmergirl is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dishonest Sellers: Which Drug are They Using??? BlueSpark Horse Health 19 09-14-2013 11:49 AM
have you seen this? Horrible rottenweiler Driving 37 07-03-2011 02:41 PM
Beware dishonest horse traders are everywhere JennKzoo Horse Talk 0 10-16-2010 03:09 PM
Horrible, horrible news 1dog3cats17rodents Horse Grooming 26 07-21-2009 08:19 AM
Dishonest Horse People Moxie Horse Talk 26 02-13-2009 11:27 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome