Horse Hates Blanket, Dangerously Sprinting Around! - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 46 Old 02-03-2017, 01:42 PM
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OP's horse should learn to accept the blanket. Doesn't matter if Horse needs it or not, as mentioned by others it will carry over to other things and is a good excuse to get Horse desensitized to things being thrown over it, rubbed with strange objects, straps touching in odd places, etc. If my gelding gets "weird" (spooky, apprehensive, agitated, or just gives a 'weird look') about an object, a sound, a touch or motion, I make a point to do a session or two recreating that thing in order to let him know that that's just something that happens, and it will consistently happen and he can carry on with his life. He used to be concerned with the weirdest things: Zippers, swishy rain coats (you know the type), loud noises, back legs being picked up, people snapping their gum, squeaky loud rolling stall doors, etc. He doesn't really spook like a normal horse, he just gets really agitated, the whites of his eyes show, and I've even seen him tremble like a rich ladies 2lb dog would (that was over the neighbors bonfire - really freaked him out, not sure if he'd ever seen a big fire). OP's horse should absolutely have every opportunity taken to expose new things.

That being said, @ApuetsoT brought up that it could be a static issue causing the horse to be uncomfortable. My gelding had a cooler that, when wearing it, he would get dancey/jumpy occasionally. While he is thoroughbred, he's the least bit spooky, and rarely ever "hot" in the true sense. I thought it was strange, but had only had him 8 months or so, and figured maybe I just didn't know him well enough. He had previously been on pasture as part of a large herd, and not been blanketed since he was a yearling at the racetrack (i assume). He had been fine with the fly sheet he wore over the summer but I figured the fleece was a different and strange feeling. After a few times of the same situation: Horse gets a bit sweaty, its fall, windy and chilly, I toss the cooler on, he starts getting agitated - I knew something was up. I was just standing with him in the arena, thinking maybe the wind was bothering him or maybe he heard something I didn't. I was stroking his shoulder, rubbing him down with the cooler essentially, and got a static shock! Same thing happened a few minutes later. I imagine he was building static as he walked and the off/on agitation was from that.

Needless to say, I felt sorry immediately, and the next day I washed it, and treated the cooler with one of those anti-static sprays. When washing it, I make sure to throw it in the drier with those anti-static sheets. The problem went away after I did both of those things and he was much more comfortable, and totally calm/normal the next time I cooled him out in it.
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post #42 of 46 Old 02-03-2017, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Yeah, I partially agree too - they at least shouldn't be bred if they have any known inheritable problems. But while genetics may be somewhat at fault for seriously 'IR prone breeds', IR is a NATURAL response to chronic 'good condition', of which any animal isn't built/evolved for, and many horse feeds, including 'improved' grasses, are far richer these days than horses have evolved for. IOW it's a people caused 'disease'... epidemic these days for horses, people, dogs, cats... funny that.
I had the vet make the interesting point about people in denial about their pets being overweight- they think it reflects on them hearing "he's fat" is the same as hearing "your fat" and people don't want to hear that.

Very frustrating to see overweight animals to me. It's something they have no control over yet causes severe health issues and possibly death.
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post #43 of 46 Old 02-03-2017, 09:54 PM
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This is interesting to me! I have a couple of disjointed thoughts about it so I'll do my best to organize them! I think that this is a genuinely valuable topic of conversation!

I wax back and forth between agreeing and disagreeing with you on the sentiment of just letting "disabled" horses go. This is something I've really waffled over since coming more to terms with how truly disabled my gelding is.
On the pro side, I learned mid-summer 2016 that my gelding actually came out of the kill pen in September of 2012. Someone stuck him in there [illness forced the sale] and despite the horse numbers in that sale reaching an all-time low [90% of the no-sale horses went straight to kill], my gelding got a second chance in the pen. Someone pulled him out ON his ship date [mysteriously, his ship date was actually my 21st birthday], he was resold a month later with a false story, and ended up coming to me about a year later. I only found out about his kill pen adventure when I randomly mashed together the right search terms in Google and suddenly a picture of MY horse popped up in an archived auction listing! Talk about a surprise.

Anyway, I still feel like, with his issues, maybe being sent to slaughter would have been a quicker, and therefore nicer, end than his current life of variable, never-ending pain. If he had gone then, I don't feel like it would have been wrong. I don't love slaughter, but I think that that perhaps is a good reason for it - an out for horses that need an out.

NOW though, now that my gelding has made it this far, I can't imagine putting him down for his issues. He has already escaped death numerous times and he has so much try and hope, I couldn't justify letting him go right now. I have a pact with all my animals - when they are uncomfortable more than 50% of the time, when life is more of a challenge than it is enjoyable, I let them go. My job is to steward them, not to hold them here, and I take that job seriously.

Additionally -the thing that really gets me- what if my guy is the one that has the genetic key to his disease, or what if, at some point in his life, we figure out a treatment that works and ends up helping tons of other horses?? He's one of the younger ones, that I know of, with his particular symptoms - he could give science all kinds of information about longterm care, what works/doesn't work, lifespan, progressive-ness of the disease, and so forth.
I seem destined to get "broken" horses, I might as well stick with one I really like!
There's also the factor that the research group we're working with has, based on statistical analysis of test results and associated bloodlines, estimated that 20%+ of AQHA horses are likely to be affected by one or more PSSM myopathy [P1, P2, P3, Px, P4, and/or P5]. The statistics are similar with Arabs. Positive horses have been found in numerous breeds, many continents, all riding disciplines. Those statistics could change, and many of that 20%+ could be non-symptomatic, but many of these newly-discovered myopathies have a later-in-life onset [typically between ages 8 and 15, and generally triggered by injury].
I've heard SO many stories from people where their wonder horse got cast at age 10 and basically was nutso after that, turns out the horse has P2 or P3 that was triggered by being cast - it's really hard for me to hear!
As science discovers more myopathies, it becomes less about if a horse has a myopathy or not and more about which one they have and if it's a myopathy you can live with.
The statistics are not good for me to be able to go out and get a "healthy" horse, and, even if the horse were free of muscular diseases, their legs could be junk, their mind could be junk, we might not get along...who knows.

Anyway, I still have a hard time with the idea of just letting disabled horses go without a second thought - "oh, you have a life-long illness? Here, have some euthanasia solution."
I understand the concept and I tend to agree in some circumstances [like, when a clearly disabled horse is in a kill pen and the homes that are lined up are ones that want to exhaust all resources to save one single horse that might not have a great quality of life in the end, or when a horse has been catastrophically injured and resources are exhausted to gain a low quality of life], but I also think that saying all disabled horses should be put to sleep might be an overly simplistic way to view the issue.


I think about this particular topic quite often, I'm very interested by it.
"Anyway, I still have a hard time with the idea of just letting disabled horses go without a second thought - "oh, you have a life-long illness? Here, have some euthanasia solution." "

I strongly disagree with that as well (as an in general, sometimes it's for the best of course). BUT what I do 100% agree with is culling those horses from the breeding pool. Yet people don't.... I genuinely don't understand.
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post #44 of 46 Old 02-04-2017, 02:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
I had the vet make the interesting point about people in denial about their pets being overweight- they think it reflects on them hearing "he's fat" is the same as hearing "your fat" and people don't want to hear that.

Very frustrating to see overweight animals to me. It's something they have no control over yet causes severe health issues and possibly death.
I just reread this and can't BELIEVE how bad the grammar is...please disregard that aspect lol! Concept still stands.
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post #45 of 46 Old 02-04-2017, 06:07 PM
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^Haha, I'm a bit pedantic about spelling, and grammar so far as using the wrong words (I seen him do it...) but much to my Pommy father's horror, grammar wasn't a subject when I was at school, so after re-reading, have to admit my total ignorance there - sounds fine to me.
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post #46 of 46 Old 02-08-2017, 11:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
^Haha, I'm a bit pedantic about spelling, and grammar so far as using the wrong words (I seen him do it...) but much to my Pommy father's horror, grammar wasn't a subject when I was at school, so after re-reading, have to admit my total ignorance there - sounds fine to me.
for those who don't speak "Australian" :))...when loosie refers to her "Pommy" father she's is telling you her dad was a Brit (or English), as oppose to a native born Australian. It's often a derogatory term, but can be used as a somewhat cheeky term of endearment. Just as "git" is a derogatory British term, but my ex would often laugh and lovingly referred to me as a "cheeky git".
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