Horse Manure removal - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 06-01-2020, 02:01 PM Thread Starter
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Horse Manure removal

Bringing 5 more horses to add to the 3 we currently have after new barn is finished. Anyone have the best options when it comes to Manure removal? What/where to pile it, dumpster rental, nurseries ect? Thanks!!

Jim
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post #2 of 8 Old 06-01-2020, 02:12 PM
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It all depends on how much land you have and what your zoning restrictions are:)
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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #3 of 8 Old 06-01-2020, 04:51 PM
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If you live rurally and have land I would compost it in bins and then spread it back on the pastures. At least that's what I do. I have just two horses and my set up is two 8x12' bins. When one is aging the other is filling. If you have more horses, more bins. People buy composted manure in 30 lb bags for $5.00 a bag. You could have a side business!
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post #4 of 8 Old 06-01-2020, 07:19 PM
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8 horses making manure daily is a huge amount of manure to compost, spread on the ground unless you have 100 acres of more... even then it will soon overtake any grounds ability to absorb and utilize those products quickly.

I found this excerpt from a a article of numbers given...the rest of the staggering numbers can be found by using the link at excerpt end.
This excerpt is concerning poop only, not any soiled or wet bedding...then the numbers are truly staggering x 8 horses!
Enjoy the following read, and do read...

A 1,000 pound horse will defecate approximately four to thirteen times each day and produce approximately nine tons of manure per year. The 1,000 pound horse will produce, on the average, 37 pounds of feces and 2.4 gallons of urine daily, which totals about 50 pounds of raw waste per day in feces and urine combined.
https://lpelc.org/stall-waste-produc...nd-management/

Fast math calculation...
8 horses x 37 pounds of manure product minimum daily = 296 pounds of just feces every day.
You are going to be dealing with the urine issue smell as it is just because you have that many horses in a barn area and contained...

I don't know of to many places that can manage that amount of waste product on their farm daily without awful stench and fly problem.
Think you would be better to look at roll-off dumpster removal weekly by contracted carrier so it is gone and not festering.
You want to make a compost pile is fine but not @ 300 pounds of poop a day is unmanageable for the average person/business such as horse barn/boarding situation.
Once you add stall and wet bedding material your weight average just went to 50 -70 pounds of waste per animal per day.

I know in the Ocala to central area of the state this company https://www.floridaexpress.us/reside...-removal/index does dumpster removal of waste from horse farms. I'm sure there are other companies that do this, but I see these trucks often and remembered their name.
{I have no affiliation/connection to any removal companies}
Owned by a family connected with horses themselves they are very aware of the need for proper removal to protect our aquifer and land.
Not knowing which county you are in will dictate what you will be required to do by zoning codes of your area...
Many counties have specialized programs and laws on the books regarding poop, kept, composted and removed and how those are to be done.
A search of county code might help but be time-consuming or a internet search for your county, generalized area might give you faster advice on what to do...legally cause when you have that many horses in a stable environment people are going to see the enormous manure pile you will have in a weeks time...about 4,000+ pounds worth of poop is a lot of poop at a minimum when stall bedding is added to the numbers shoveled...
When horses are just living in large acreage of pastures 24/7 management of manure is far different than stabled animals and their requirements and needs and the zoning you now must meet.
...
jmo...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #5 of 8 Old 06-01-2020, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Avna View Post
People buy composted manure in 30 lb bags for $5.00 a bag. You could have a side business!

Sadly Avna selling is not often done...giving away composted for free is hard enough.
Horses here are so plentiful and found in near every yard or so that there is a over-abundance of product so people don't "buy" it.
Even cow manure is easily had from local ranchers and dairy farms...most homeowners with a garden of normal size only need a few garbage can loads to enrich their ground.
Not sure anyone pays for it, in our area at least.
...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #6 of 8 Old 06-02-2020, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Sadly Avna selling is not often done...giving away composted for free is hard enough.
Horses here are so plentiful and found in near every yard or so that there is a over-abundance of product so people don't "buy" it.
Even cow manure is easily had from local ranchers and dairy farms...most homeowners with a garden of normal size only need a few garbage can loads to enrich their ground.
Not sure anyone pays for it, in our area at least.
...
^^^^^Equally as true in my area. I couldnít even pay someone to haul of m ire that had composted down to dirt - I tried once.

Cow manure is much more highly sought after, and trying to sell that is a waste of time

I have 25 acres. When I had four horses, I had three areas where I dumped manure, well away from the barn area.

Now there are two. I carry to one area. DH carries to the other area on a cliff side, inside a tree grove, when we do the big Sunday cleaning. For some reason, neither area has become a breeding ground of flies or bugs, which is fine by me because I donít have to spray and chance killing the good guys.

If there is a lot of excess uneaten hay, DH will often scatter it across the pasture. It will either go down into the ground or sit quietly until it gets chopped during the next bush hogging:)

The smaller the acreage, the more anal one has to be regarding cleanliness. Less acreage means a lot more labor intensive work. Bigger and BIG acreage means a lot more cost in equipment that will do the work for you:):)
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I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #7 of 8 Old 06-02-2020, 11:24 AM
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You have to research your area really.
When we lived in the UK we were always able to find an arable farmer who'd take our manure, either collect it or we could drop it off.

We've not found that here and we had no luck selling it to commercial landscapers either - other than one load way back.

We now have all of our manure taken from site by a company called Sweet Peet. They will either provide you with a large dumpster that they come and collect when full and drop off an empty one at the same time or they come and remove your muck heap.
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post #8 of 8 Old 06-02-2020, 12:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Avna View Post
If you live rurally and have land I would compost it in bins and then spread it back on the pastures. At least that's what I do. I have just two horses and my set up is two 8x12' bins. When one is aging the other is filling. If you have more horses, more bins. People buy composted manure in 30 lb bags for $5.00 a bag. You could have a side business!

I recycle my feed bags and fill them with manure and sell them at my little vegetable stand. Can't keep it in stock. I'll have people come knocking on my door for more manure, and then when I say I'm out, they see the manure I've saved for myself and want me to sell that! It really depends on your area I guess.



For the manure I keep, I pile it in rectangular raised beds and grow a pretty kickin' garden every year! I have 9 horses if that matters.
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