Hosing hot horse - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 44 Old 07-13-2015, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by hollysjubilee View Post
I do believe this is the point of scraping over-heated horses who have been worked to a lather in hot temperatures.
The hair on the horses holds the water in a way that our skin doesn't, and if you have ever hosed down a hot polo horse, you know that the water that is scraped off after hosing is HOT!
Horses that get hot just hanging around in the pasture or who have gone on a light ride wouldn't require the same level of attention, although I'm sure it wouldn't hurt and would give you more time with your horse.
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I have never hosed a hot polo horse (why is this starting to sound like porn?) but I have definitely had this experience with my own horses.
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hahaha . . . (shhhhhhhh . . . it's a PG-rated site!)
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"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #32 of 44 Old 07-14-2015, 10:07 AM
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The polo horses should have been sprayed until the skin had cooled like what happens when the horse goes for a swim. He'll stay in until he's cooled down.



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post #33 of 44 Old 07-16-2015, 03:13 AM
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A piece of bailer string will remove a lot of water, just hold a length between your hands and scrape away.
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post #34 of 44 Old 07-16-2015, 08:25 AM
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The polo horses should have been sprayed until the skin had cooled like what happens when the horse goes for a swim. He'll stay in until he's cooled down.
Not practical with the time and water constraints at a field and during practices and games.

Most of us scrape.
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post #35 of 44 Old 07-16-2015, 08:35 AM
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I found this article, I knew there had been a lot of research into cooling a hot horse prior to the Atlanta Olympics.

Generally it is not a problem here in the UK!

The proper way to cool a hot horse

Many owners and trainers have never been taught how to properly cool a hot exercising horse.

How hard can it be -- just hose your horse down with water, right?

Actually it is very important to understand how to safely and quickly cool down a hot, sweaty horse.

The 1994 FEI Samsung Equine Sports Medicine Conference in Atlanta addressed problems that were anticipated in the intense heat and humidity that was likely to occur during the 1996 Olympic Games. Research that came from that initiative showed that simply hosing off a horse did little good -- it did not significantly drop the horse's temperature and may in fact have been detrimental.

Researchers showed that cool-to-cold water being poured or sprayed over a horse's skin wets the horse and the very thin layer of water actually contacting the horse's skin is super-heated quickly to the horse's body temperature.

The rest of the water being sponged or dumped or sprayed on the horse merely sheets over that initial one- to two-cell water layer on the horse. The initial water actually acts like a raincoat and does not allow other water molecules to contact and cool the skin, so the horse may in fact become hotter in the process.

The best method for cooling a horse is to spray or sponge on water with one hand and to almost immediately scrape off the now super-heated water with a sweat scraper in your other hand. "Spray, scrape, repeat" is the cooling method of choice. This means of cooling can significantly drop a horse's core temperature and requires less actual water since large volumes are not being wasted as they are usually dumped on a horse with little chance of having any effect.

The water can be fairly cold with this method of cooling because it does not stay on the horse's body long enough to cause muscle cramping which had been a previous concern when cooling horses with the application of cold water.

Increasing airflow can also help with cooling, so fans and a location with a breeze may help cool an exercising horse but researchers have shown that water is still 20 times more efficient at cooling horses.
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post #36 of 44 Old 07-16-2015, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by boots View Post
Not practical with the time and water constraints at a field and during practices and games.

Most of us scrape.
Was going to offer this explanation earlier, but didn't because in an ideal situation, we would use as much water/time as it takes to cool the horse down.
Often at the polo field, there may only be the water the player brings in his trailer (35-50 gallons), so we spray, scrape and walk in the shade (if there is any shade).
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post #37 of 44 Old 07-16-2015, 09:05 AM
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During the Atlanta games horses were ridden between huge fans that sent out a mist.



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post #38 of 44 Old 07-16-2015, 09:14 AM
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During the Atlanta games horses were ridden between huge fans that sent out a mist.
Wish I had some of those huge fans to line up in the aisle between my paddocks right now! We finally got to the hot part of summer.
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post #39 of 44 Old 07-16-2015, 09:51 AM
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"The rest of the water being sponged or dumped or sprayed on the horse merely sheets over that initial one"

If I sponge or dump some water on my horse...yeah, it just stays there. If I hose them with flowing water, it differs.

I habitually go jogging when it is 100 deg out. If I sponge off at the end, even here in Arizona, that doesn't cool me much. But a few minutes in a cool shower is a different story.

Sponging is what I do to get some of the sweat and salt off. Hosing them down for a few minutes, using a nozzle, is what cools them. That is also the difference between sponging and swimming. IMHO. Flowing water.

I'd love to see a polo match where, at the end, they all race their ponies into a lake and spend 10 minutes splashing around! Me? I'm not sure my horses have ever SEEN a lake...

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #40 of 44 Old 07-16-2015, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
I found this article, I knew there had been a lot of research into cooling a hot horse prior to the Atlanta Olympics.

Generally it is not a problem here in the UK!

The proper way to cool a hot horse

Many owners and trainers have never been taught how to properly cool a hot exercising horse.

How hard can it be -- just hose your horse down with water, right?

Actually it is very important to understand how to safely and quickly cool down a hot, sweaty horse.

The 1994 FEI Samsung Equine Sports Medicine Conference in Atlanta addressed problems that were anticipated in the intense heat and humidity that was likely to occur during the 1996 Olympic Games. Research that came from that initiative showed that simply hosing off a horse did little good -- it did not significantly drop the horse's temperature and may in fact have been detrimental.

Researchers showed that cool-to-cold water being poured or sprayed over a horse's skin wets the horse and the very thin layer of water actually contacting the horse's skin is super-heated quickly to the horse's body temperature.

The rest of the water being sponged or dumped or sprayed on the horse merely sheets over that initial one- to two-cell water layer on the horse. The initial water actually acts like a raincoat and does not allow other water molecules to contact and cool the skin, so the horse may in fact become hotter in the process.

The best method for cooling a horse is to spray or sponge on water with one hand and to almost immediately scrape off the now super-heated water with a sweat scraper in your other hand. "Spray, scrape, repeat" is the cooling method of choice. This means of cooling can significantly drop a horse's core temperature and requires less actual water since large volumes are not being wasted as they are usually dumped on a horse with little chance of having any effect.

The water can be fairly cold with this method of cooling because it does not stay on the horse's body long enough to cause muscle cramping which had been a previous concern when cooling horses with the application of cold water.

Increasing airflow can also help with cooling, so fans and a location with a breeze may help cool an exercising horse but researchers have shown that water is still 20 times more efficient at cooling horses.
See I had found an article last week (was trying to re-find all morning but haven't had luck yet) that hosing a hot horse with cold water cools them down faster without any detrimental effects.

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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