How to know who/what to believe - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 32 Old 10-05-2014, 07:19 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms View Post
What type of riding are you learning? There is no such thing as an authoritative book, but there are some pretty well respected ones, depending on style.
I guess you would say I'm learning Western. The saddle I will be using is Western.

I'm not so concerned about the riding aspect. I have a trainer for that and will just do what she instructs.

It's more handling horses under not so straightforward conditions that I'm concerned with. Things like how to separate a horse from the rest of the guys in the corral so they can be moved to their night stall/pen. Sometimes their buddies like to interfere with that and while there hasn't been any huge problems so far I know there must be better ways of dealing with it that I currently have.
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post #12 of 32 Old 10-06-2014, 07:17 AM
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Read as much as you can, be quiet and pay attention to good horsemen, and keep in mind that just because you learn ABC and it works with 20000 horses that you might handle?

Along will come one that XYZ is the only method.

Not so much in the handling of them, but in the training/riding more.

They all have some common traits, but one may differ greatly here and there.

Get some good books, and read, Amazon.com usually has some very good prices on used books.
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post #13 of 32 Old 10-09-2014, 08:17 AM
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Have we confused you enough yet? A lot of horse handling is trial and error, what works with one horse may not work for another. Use common sense and be patient. I am fairly new to gaited horses and I get LOTS of unsolicited advice on how I should be riding/training my gaited mare. I look at the horse that person is riding....if it is well turned out, well mannered, and gaits nicely I pay attention. If not, I thank them for their input and ignore it, lol.
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post #14 of 32 Old 10-09-2014, 08:34 AM
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If you can phrase the question in a way that doesn't sound like you are challenging her skills, it may be a good opportunity to open a discussion. Two people can appear to do exactly the same thing with the same horse yet one may elicit a different response. Body language and energy come in to play. It's ok to follow various protocols but you'll eventually sort out what works for you and this is maybe how it's been with her.



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post #15 of 32 Old 10-09-2014, 09:48 AM
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Not only will you get 100 answers from 100 riders, but, no 2 horses are the same.

We have 13horses on the farm, and have had as many as 22, and i can tell you, that i don't approach/handle any 2 of them the same. most of what you will do is going to be pretty standard, but if you will "listen" the horses will teach you as much if not more than any person. In a couple of weeks you can not expect to learn everything, or even much. Right now your concern should be getting comfortable with the horses. the rest will more or less come with experience.

As far as people are concerned, I have found that if you ask people, they will tell you one thing, and if you watch them they will show you something completely different. The best way to learn is to observe, watch the others at the rescue that get good results and take not of what they are doing. then if you have questions ask them why they do what they do rather than what they are doing.

Jim
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post #16 of 32 Old 10-09-2014, 11:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyp View Post
Not only will you get 100 answers from 100 riders, but, no 2 horses are the same.

We have 13horses on the farm, and have had as many as 22, and i can tell you, that i don't approach/handle any 2 of them the same. most of what you will do is going to be pretty standard, but if you will "listen" the horses will teach you as much if not more than any person. In a couple of weeks you can not expect to learn everything, or even much. Right now your concern should be getting comfortable with the horses. the rest will more or less come with experience.

As far as people are concerned, I have found that if you ask people, they will tell you one thing, and if you watch them they will show you something completely different. The best way to learn is to observe, watch the others at the rescue that get good results and take not of what they are doing. then if you have questions ask them why they do what they do rather than what they are doing.

Jim
I coudn't agree more with this statement. I agree that the best thing you can do at this stage is observe, but really observe the horses too. See how they interact with the herd and how they act when removed from the herd.

What I have found to be one of the most difficult parts of "horse life" is that when you ask a question you will get an answer. A very confident answer at that. And then someone will come along telling you that you are doing it all wrong. It really forces you to understand your horse and determine what works best for you AND that particular horse.

For me, watching and doing is the best way for me to learn. You tube can be your friend. I would recommend any of Warwick Schiller's videos, Evention TV is really good for basic fundamentals. All on you tube. Now, this is MY opinion, and these videos have helped me and my horses out. I also found "Buck" the documentary to be really entertaining and helpful. I'm sure someone will come behind me and say Warwick is garbage, and those folks on Evention TV don't know what they are talking about...but hey, welcome to the territory!

The best piece of advice I can give is this: Don't rush anything. Just soak up everything you can and enjoy the ride...literally
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post #17 of 32 Old 10-09-2014, 11:18 AM
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I’ve never bought into any one particular trainer’s methods because no one who goes “by the book” with a living, breathing, feeling and thinking creature will ever find ”the one perfect technique”.Horses are as different and varied as every human you meet and each must be approached on a one-to-one basis.Many people seem to latch onto a big name trainers with a lot of publicity and videos to sell and then treat it as almost as a religion.They close their eyes and minds in the hopes that one size fits all.

When I watch someone work with a horse I am asking myself some questions inside. What is this trainer trying to get the horse to do? What methods are they using? Is it humane and fair to the horse? Did they get their point across and did the horse actually learn the intended behavior?

If I end up not even getting past the 1st question, then I am saying in my head to the trainer:“If I can’t understand what the heck you are trying to accomplish, how do you expect this poor horse to understand?” Unfortunately I see a lot of people (usually low level) do this and call themselves trainers. Most of the time they get more and more frustrated, angry and then resort to abuse.

I love to see new techniques and new ways of thinking. When you open your mind to the possibilities, you can really do amazing things with horses.
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post #18 of 32 Old 10-10-2014, 12:07 PM
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Some good answers here. If it seems like a lot, it's because it is. There's no bottom to it and there's always more to learn. Whether it's with books, dvds, live instruction or people with youtube videos, in time it'll become clearer to you who is legitimately good and who's full of hot air. In general it helps to make friends with the feeling of not knowing and to enjoy the process of never-ending discovery. All of the theory and seemingly-contradictory opinions are resolved through the filter of experience. Eventually you will find that most all of them are right about some things, wrong about others. I've never found a teacher yet with whom I agree on everything, but that doesn't mean that they're wrong. However this becomes less important once you develop self-trust in your horsemanship. In my own journey, I live by the creedo of Jeet Kune Do (Bruce Lee's approach to martial arts and life): "absorb what is useful, reject what is useless, add what is essentially your own". You are the master of the art - the art is not the master of you. Your qualities as a horseman, how you carry yourself and your composure and sensitivity as you interact with them are the most important. Far more important than a particular style or method. A good horseman can make almost any tool or technique work.
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post #19 of 32 Old 10-10-2014, 02:42 PM
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Everyone does things differently and believes different things. But right on ya for going out and trying to find the right answers!! :)

Personally I like to take everyone's opinions and views as you can always learn something new from other people. But as I take all of them into consideration I choose my own beliefs and choose which ways I prefer best.

It definitely depends on the person. But I highly encourage you to continue reading and searching up more about horsemanship and horses! Don't limit yourself just to the internet either! Meet other horse people and talk to them and there are plenty of horse related books that are fantastic sources for information! :)
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post #20 of 32 Old 10-10-2014, 06:46 PM
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Don't drink the Coolaid!! Many people tend to get fanatical about 'following' a particular trainer or program, to the exclusion of anything else, and often to the exclusion of objectivity about specifics of that trainer - as Chasin put it, they do it 'by the book', take it as Gospel, on blind faith. I appreciate your difficulties as a complete beginner, that a lot of stuff you learn initially will be on blind faith, but if you're openminded & logical, you'll soon learn enough to start knowing what to take or leave, from whoever/whatever sources you learn from. If in doubt, go with your gut.
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