how to train horse to lead correctly? HELP - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 62Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 08:46 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 850
• Horses: 0
I want Sonny to be WHEREVER I CUE HIM to be when I lead him. Most often, it's with his nose pretty much at my shoulder level with him 2ft-ish away. BUT, I switch it up, because you never know what circumstances might require me to lead him , for safety sake, in any position.Also, simply for me=leader,,you put your feet where I tell you to.
He will lead with me at his nose, neck, shoulder, barrel, rump, or to stretch into the driving VS leading realm, me behind him with the one rope-out of kick zone.

How to teach it? start at the halt. Have the horse on a long, loose lead. Just stand where you want to be and it will be very interesting to see where he puts you. I'll bet he will 'leak' into a different position than where you started. Most likely when he thinks you are no longer focused on him. The reason lots of horses accept a person standing at their barrel , say for grooming, is that they are cross tied and don't have much choice, imho. I know Sonny used to reposition himself if I tried to stand very long at his barrel and he had a choice. I'd soon realize I was now at his neck. How'd that happen???
So, if I were you, I'd start at the halt , with a loose lead, at the location you want to be when leading, and just simply put him back AFTER he moves out of position. When he can leave you there for longer, give him rubs, turn away and move out of his space. Build from there until he is confident to allow you to be in that spot, then add walking into the mix.
jmho

Fay
Cordillera Cowboy and Pearsj like this.

Respect......rapport......impulsion......flexion.. .
Be as soft as possible, but as firm as necessary--Pat Parelli
mslady254 is offline  
post #12 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 08:48 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,295
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pearsj View Post
I have had my horse a couple of weeks now and haven't been able to ride much because of weather. I have been working with him though in the arena just walking him with halter on lead rope doing patterns, etc. Tonight he would not walk beside me, but kept falling behind and wanting to walk exactly behind me. I know that's wrong - but have no idea how to correct him. Any suggestions? Thanks.
I would prefer a horse to lead at my side too, but If you watch horses turned out together they very often will walk in a single file. I think your new horse is accepting you and saying "You're in charge I'll just follow you". That is a good attitude on his part. I would advance from just walking patterns to teaching basic ground work. Getting him to move around you and lounging. There are many good videos out there for teaching a horse to lounge. I think it is the routine in the arena that he has fallen into. Try walking him somewhere else just to see if it changes
Pearsj likes this.
Textan49 is offline  
post #13 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 11:18 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Southern Indiana
Posts: 8,701
• Horses: 12
Mine walk behind me. They know being nervous or spooking is no excuse to run me over. I've raised most of them so it's a lot easier to teach them that lesson very well when they aren't big enough to plow you over.

R.I.P. JC 5/19/85 - 12/9/14. You made my life better.
JCnGrace is offline  
post #14 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 12:04 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,108
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCnGrace View Post
Mine walk behind me. They know being nervous or spooking is no excuse to run me over.
Sorry, but with all due respect, I have to place that in the same category as the old "I trust my horse so much I don't need to wear a helmet when riding" argument.

A horse is a horse. Someday if and when something scares them bad enough that's legitimately fear for their life they won't care if you're in their way.
Posted via Mobile Device
updownrider, natisha and Yogiwick like this.
PrivatePilot is offline  
post #15 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 01:35 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,295
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivatePilot View Post

A horse is a horse. Someday if and when something scares them bad enough that's legitimately fear for their life they won't care if you're in their way.
Posted via Mobile Device
I think we always need to be prepared for the unexpected. This is why I would prefer the horse to be at my side. I can see what he is looking at that could cause him to spook and can quickly grab the halter if necessary and you might be in a better situation to stay on your feet. Do I always do it though? Of course not.

I wouldn't say that a horse won't "care" if he plows you over during a frightful episode. I would rather say that he might not be able to avoid it. I have had many horses make the effort to get around me rather than over me when they have spooked. How much of a conscious effort to look out for me this was I can't say, but it has happened many times
Textan49 is offline  
post #16 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 02:09 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 47,398
• Horses: 2
in all handling of a horse you have to be aware that he have a place to move his feet, if he must, and it's not on top of you. I am always thinking about what will happen if he surges forward. will I be in his way? mostly, they do try to avoid you. as long as they have somewhere to go, they'll usually go there instead of on top of you. still, I don't like a horse leading right behind me. I can't see behind me.

the horse I am riding now really wants to be close to me, though, and it's proved a constant battle for me to reset him off of me a bit. I have gotten to where I will tolerate him walking off to my side, and allow him close enough that he can put his nose on my elbow. he really seems to like that position, so we compromise.
PrivatePilot and Yogiwick like this.
tinyliny is offline  
post #17 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 02:31 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,108
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
mostly, they do try to avoid you. as long as they have somewhere to go, they'll usually go there instead of on top of you..
I agree, but I chose my words carefully.

Quote:
In their way
When given no other choice a panicked horse will often bowl over whatever is in its way. If given a choice, yes, going around an obstacle is the easiest route however.

The situation I witnessed was a horse being led through the connector between a stall area and an attached arena. Pretty typical stuff but a bit confined in some facilities, including the one in question for me. The horse spooked when a pair of pigeons suddenly flew (at high speed) out of the arena and into this hallway...and within inches of the horses head on the way past. His rider got completely plowed over and caught a hoof or two in the process. The horse bolted into the arena before deciding to calm down as death wasn't inminent.

No broken bones but there were injuries.

Simply leading from the side vs having the horse tracking blindly behind the rider would have completely eliminated the risk. Ever since witnessing that I've been very adamant about teaching others to always lead from the side and never be blind of your horse.
Rascaholic, natisha and Yogiwick like this.

-- In the great white north - Canada!
Every ride is a lesson, for you AND your horse - Newbies read this thread!
Thinking of buying an older trailer? Go in eyes wide open!
PrivatePilot is offline  
post #18 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 03:56 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,178
• Horses: 4
There is no way I want a horse walking behind me unless I am going down a trail and there is no other choice.

Horses slip and slide and I don't want to be in front of that.

I prefer their head by my shoulder so I can read their ears
ChitChatChet is offline  
post #19 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 04:40 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 47,398
• Horses: 2
if I had to go through a very narrow place, I might choose to either send the horse through ahead of me, have him turn around and face me, a few feet off, and them me come through.
or, back him away from the narrow gap, me go through while makeing him wait , then allowing him to come through to join me. usually, it is better to send your horse ahead of you. I haven't had to deal with this sort of narrow place for a long time, as we have no indoor facilities at all .

like, if you have a narrow but deep stream or channel or other obstacle on the trail and you must get off, be careful if you go ahead that you do not pull your horse ON to you. if you can, better to send it ahead, have it turn around, then you climb over to join it.
natisha and Yogiwick like this.
tinyliny is offline  
post #20 of 44 Old 02-25-2015, 05:12 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Alberta
Posts: 847
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
the OP is right to be uncomfortable about the hrose walking directly behind her. this is not good. should the hrose be spooked and lunge forward, he will step on her.
To be fair, a horse can spook from any direction and cause the leader harm if the situation has the right number of factors.

Yesterday I was leading my mare from the pasture to the barn, and she spooked at someone getting out of their car. In this situation, I was leading her properly with her at my side, and she ended up sidestepping into me and her hoof made nice solid contact with my foot. There was no way to avoid this, given the parking lot is circular and so therefor we were surrounded on all sides by cars. This is normal on a busy day at the barn. I don't get to pick and choose my surroundings and the world doesn't revolve around me and my horse. Accidents happen and it was no one's fault.

But I do understand that, OP, you would rather have your horse at your side. Your horse may not understand that you want it there - so you need to make it clearer.

I am going to try and get my thoughts collected to explain what you could try, bear with me. This is how I trained all three of my horses to lead beside me... Sorry if I fail to put this in words that are understandable.

1. Introduce the idea of walking beside you. Start by standing next to the horse at the shoulder. Point YOUR body forward, just like you would if you were leading. Take a step forward and, while doing so, ask the horse to move on or step forward as well. You can do this by standing beside the horse and pointing your lead rope forward. Use a crop, whip, or your other arm to drive the horse forward at the shoulder if it does not move on cue. This reinforces the idea that when you walk, the horse should also walk and that the two of you walk side by side always. I assume your horse already has a basic understanding of this, since it leads behind you. Soon your horse will be a pro, and will understand that when your leg moves forward, that its legs must also move forward!

2. Correct unwanted behavior. If your horse starts to drift behind you (this is expected since it thinks you want it to follow behind), immediately correct it. If your horse moved behind you, take the arm you are carrying the lead rope with and OPEN IT OUTWARDS, asking the horse to follow the direction the lead rope is pointed. The idea is, if you point your lead rope in a certain direction, the horse will move into that space. Open your arm to the right and the horse should move to the right, effectively coming up beside you. This is a useful tool in any leading situation. You should just be able to point and ask, and your horse should go.

If the horse does not move in the desired direction, then the horse doesn't understand and you need to make it clearer. If opening your arm does not work, add the whip or crop at the shoulder with your other arm to drive the horse in the direction you want.

Remember to keep your leading arm open in the direction you want! Do not forget this if you are driving the horse forward with your other arm. Your leading arm must also be asking. Eventually, you want to be able to simply point and the horse will move into the space you want. This will even help when you need to train your horse to lunge!

I am going to post some pictures to help where words fail... Give me a few minutes as I have to do this on my other PC.
mslady254 and Pearsj like this.
BreezylBeezyl is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How do you train a flying lead change? beau159 Reining 13 11-30-2012 12:12 AM
Two Questions: How to train neck reining and lead changes? AmericaWasntLost Horse Training 8 11-26-2012 11:48 PM
How to train a horse to lead bhorselover Horse Training 2 05-02-2012 08:49 PM
How do you start to train a young green horse flying lead changes? Klassic Superstar Horse Training 13 02-16-2012 07:10 PM
How to re-train an ex trail riding horse to trot/canter correctly? Blondehorselover Horse Training 2 10-20-2011 07:15 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome