I am getting a horse, and I need some help!! - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 01:03 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
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Question I am getting a horse, and I need some help!!

Hey! As the title of the question says, I am getting a new horse, and quite frankly, I don't know what to do. I am over the moon excited, but I have quite a few questions:

What questions should I ask when buying a horse?

How can I determine what my horse should eat?

What supplies do I need for my horse?

What supplies do I need for my barn?

What should I know about horse ownership?

When should I schedule my horse's first farrier and vet visit? How often do the check ups need to be?

What types of vaccinations and dewormers should I use?

I am on a fairly small budget, so any little money-saving tips would be great! And, if you have any other useful soon-to-be-horse owner tips, please share!

Last edited by leokeo; 08-04-2015 at 01:10 PM.
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post #2 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 01:16 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Germany- but not German =D
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The best advice I can give you is find someone with knowledge of your riding skills and aspirations and who knows a heck of a lot about horses.

You should DEFINITELY get a Pre Purchase Exam done by a vet before you buy the horse. Ask the owner what farrier and worming schedule the horse is on too. Some yards want you to worm the horse on arrival. The vet will be able to inform you what shots and wormer to use etc when he is there.

As for equipment, it depends on climate. Also, is he being stabled at your own place? If so, most horses don't do well without company. He or she may very well need a friend. If you're going to a barn, I have always found people are super helpful if you ask nicely and respect their kit when you realise you need something and don't have it.

Basics include headcollar and leadrope, brushes, hoofpick, tack, horse first aid kit, water and feed buckets, rugs? (fly or winter depending), fly spray?, possibly boots if he knocks himself, tack.
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post #3 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 01:17 PM
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are you buying teh horse, or your parents? buying it for you?

what past experience with horses do you have?

your questions are so many that what you need to do is go to the library of surf Amazon and get some good books on horse care and ownership.
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post #4 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 01:21 PM
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Honestly, these are questions that you should be working through with a competent and experienced horse person. We can all give you advice to the moon and back, but not everything is going to work in your given situation.

I recommend picking up any one of the many "Your First Horse" books that are available, both online and at libraries. I like a lot of Cherry Hill's books for beginners, as they are easy to read and cover a lot of ground. As well, a book like "Horses For Dummies" gives a great overview of all the things you are asking about. The title does not mean you are a dummy, of course, but the book is aimed at people who need Horses 101, 102, and 103 :)

Have you taken any riding or handling lessons? Or is this more of a situation where you have decided you are fulfilling a dream? If it's the second part, most people here are REALLY going to recommend you take lessons first.

As far as money-saving tips go...if your life or your horse's life may literally depend on the item in question (tack, feed, safety measures, vet care, farrier), my advice is always "invest in the best you can possibly afford". It is more money up front, but you can buy one good saddle that fits, or 5 crummy ones that hurt your horse over a long period of time. You can buy cheap feed, or good-quality feed and hay that keeps your horse in good condition and avoids health problems. You can keep your horse's vaccines and wormings up to date, or deal with a sick or colicking horse.

Good luck on your adventure. Stick around and read this forum, you will learn a lot!
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post #5 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 01:25 PM
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If you had previous knowledge, you would know the answer to most of these. Have you taken lessons? If not, I HIGHLY suggest you call off horse ownership and take lessons for a few years. Coming from someone who bought a horse with little experience, the road is HARD. It's much easier and more enjoyable if you take lessons beforehand and get the knowledge you need. For the horse's sake, get lessons. ;)

Quote:
What questions should I ask when buying a horse?
You should take a knowledgeable horse person with you. How old the horse is, their breed, personality, rider level, experience, etc. Have they had any past injuries, medical issues, etc.

Quote:
How can I determine what my horse should eat?
It depends on the horse. If the horse is already getting feed, use the feed he's already eating.

Quote:
What supplies do I need for my horse?
If he doesn't come with stuff, you'll need a halter, lead rope, bridle, saddle, saddle pad, grooming supplies, etc. And a HELMET. Depending on what your doing or his condition, you may need extra stuff.

Quote:
What supplies do I need for my barn?
If he's in a stall: rake, shovel, wheelbarrow, bedding. Fencing tools. First-Aid Kit.

Quote:
What should I know about horse ownership?
It is HARD. You'll spend lots of money and if you don't have previous experience, you'll be taking the long road. I hope you're getting lessons, it will help you a TON.

Quote:
When should I schedule my horse's first farrier and vet visit? How often do the check ups need to be?
That all depends on the horse. You'll have to ask when his last farrier visit was and how often he's trimmed/shod. Some horses last 6-8 weeks, others may need looked at every 4 weeks. You should get a PPE before buying and then ask the owner when was the horse's last vet visit, when he'll need vaccines and wormed.

Quote:
What types of vaccinations and dewormers should I use?
Depends on the season. Something to ask your vet.

Quote:
I am on a fairly small budget, so any little money-saving tips would be great! And, if you have any other useful soon-to-be-horse owner tips, please share!
If you're on a small budget, horse ownership isn't right. :/ I pay $45 just to trim my horse's hooves, your area could be more expensive. It cost like $140 for vaccines + a coggins test on my horse, feed probably costs $10-$20 a bag (depending on the feed), if you buy hay that's probably $5 a bale. Tack could cost you well over $500 and you always need a backup fund in case your horse injures himself.

Keep going, keep moving forward. You'll get it together someday.
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post #6 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 02:07 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2014
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Please don’t take offense to those of us telling you to slow down a bit.

Statistically, 80% of new horse owners get out of horses entirely within one year. Every one of them entered into it with the same enthusiasm and excitement you have right now, but when reality hit, it hit hard. People here simply want to give both you and your horse the best chance at having a good relationship.

The reasons for getting out of horses are namely two fold; first is injury. The rider was hurt by their horse and either could no longer ride or no longer could bring themselves to get back on. There are a lot of reasons this happens, but often it is either a mismatch of skills between horse and rider or a lack of knowledge of how to interact on the horse’s level. Having a group of experienced horse people around you is by far the best way to learn, and if you are keeping your horse at home, a trainer will not be enough as questions and issues will pop up on a daily basis.

The second reason people leave horses is finances. It simply got to be too much of a burden to keep the horse in good condition. What is a “burden” is different for each person.

From your post, people see that you are inexperienced, most likely young. None of these things are by any means a bad thing as they change, given time.

How that develops going forward depends on the support system you have to guide you. Doing it on your own without help increases your chances of joining the 80% and no one wants either you or your horse to end up there.

Finances: There are ways to cut a little bit here and there but generally, some things do not change; feet must be done, teeth must be floated, vaccines, feed/hay, shelter against bad weather and health issues that always seem to be lurking around the corner.

So don’t take the advice to wait a bit as discouragement but as advice given from wanting to see you have the best chance a becoming a happy, lifelong horse owner.

Best wishes!
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“You spend your whole life with horses and just about the time you think you have them figured out, a horse comes along that tells you otherwise.” –quote from my very wizened trainer


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post #7 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 02:12 PM
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I rode at a stable which meant a variety of horses from barely having been saddles to well trained, for 5 yrs. By the time I bo't my own horse I knew exactly what was involved and had a pretty good idea of costs.



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post #8 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 02:47 PM
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To put it more bluntly than the others :-

If these are genuine questions you are asking and do not know the answers, there is no way you are ready to own a horse!
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post #9 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 03:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
To put it more bluntly than the others :-

If these are genuine questions you are asking and do not know the answers, there is no way you are ready to own a horse!
Ditto that.
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post #10 of 20 Old 08-04-2015, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Aug 2015
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Thank you,

Thank you all for your replies! I want to let a few of you know that the questions I asked, I do pretty much know the answer to, I just wanted a few more opinions :)
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