I am new. I do not know what to do! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 20 Old 12-31-2014, 05:41 PM
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Location: Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
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I'm actually really impressed with how you handled the reality other members gave you. I'm assuming you're younger and all too often I see posts just like yours where the same advice is repeated and a tantrum is thrown. You'll get a horse some day. Just take the advice given to you and eventually you'll earn the responsibility and gain the knowledge necessary for owning a horse. :)
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post #12 of 20 Old 01-01-2015, 07:12 PM
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Just because you live in a city doesn't mean having a horse isn't an option. The best thing to do is start with lessons, if that is something your parents aren't willing to do then I think owning a horse is a long way off. Learn as much as you can, volunteer places and see where it takes you.
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post #13 of 20 Old 01-01-2015, 08:41 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Camp Verde, Az
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When I was younger (a long time ago!) I desperately wanted a horse. I got a job during summers at a local rental stable. Didn't get paid cash, but I got to ride all day, huge education in horse world and realized that was what I wanted. I knew the work involved, the commitment, the struggle, the cost. But, I still wanted to have my own. Others that I worked with during the summer, realized that wasn't what they wanted. Too much work, too much money, too much commitment, etc.

If there is a rental barn near you, check it out. An education like that is priceless.
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post #14 of 20 Old 01-01-2015, 09:09 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Virginia
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I was once in your place. I will tell you, Lessons, lessons, lessons! I started taking them for my 5th birthday and at age 20 I was given mine as a birthday present. I didn't want to burden my parents with paying for a horse of mine but when I more or less had a break down to my mom because my trainer was having someone come out to look at my baby, they made the decision to help me get him. From now on I'll be taking over his financial burden.
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post #15 of 20 Old 01-04-2015, 04:59 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: England
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Smile Welcome to the forum!

Welcome to the forum! Ok come on! As already mentioned I don't think you can make your dad move and find a new job (a bit selfish,) however, if you find yourself a riding stables you can learn to ride. Then I think you should get a part loan or ask a friend maybe if you can help her. Keep asking questions on here but always ask question at your stables. Read books, watch educational (horsey) films. Maybe in a biology class ask your teacher about a horses skeleton and body. You need to understand the signs of illness as well. If you do get a horse, maybe the stable your riding at will have a spare stable so you can get help, but remember it is costly. So I believe your question is what do I need? Well you need -
A fitting bridle to suit your horses strength so you don't get injured;

a martingale or breastplate if the horse throws his head up, or down;

a bit to suit your horse;

a saddle that fits the width of your horse;

Riding clothes (long socks, jods, polos, jumpers, coat and bodywarmers;)
a hat that fits and keeps you safe, I suggest a skull with a cap over the top;

Rugs - stable sheet, turnout, heavy and light, stable rug, heavy and light, a blanket, summer sheet, two fly rugs (horses can break these), exersize and competition sheet.

Boots- to protect your horses feet - Ride your horse because he may brush: brushing boots or other things so protect his legs!

Feed- choose the best feed for your horse.

High visibility stuff: Boots, tail bandages, exercise sheet, hat cover, jacket for you;

Bedding- Choose a suitable bedding, there's straw, shavings, shredded newspaper, rubber matting (I'd advise putting bedding over this), sand and others!

Riding boots - You need a pair of wellies and riding boots, keep your riding boots tip-top.

Grooming equipment- You need brushes, look up what you need and how to use them/groom a horse.

First aid - You need four types of bandages, spray and lotion/cream. You need wormers and look up the rest. I can admit my First Aid kit is pretty poor.

Vet and Farrier - The vet will check your horse, so keep his number handy in case your horse shows ANY, ANY AT ALL signs of illness! The farrier will come and do your horses feet, so depending on how much hacking you do you will need shoes or no shoes.

Luxury - After all this, now you can have luxury's for yourself. Personally I have only one luxury, a seatbone saver so make sure your horses needs are covered first!

Good Luck!
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post #16 of 20 Old 01-04-2015, 07:02 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2015
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Wanting a horse!

You could search and see if there is a pony club in your area. some pony clubs have school horses for u to learn on. It's better than just lessons bc u learn all about taking care of a horse to and they have other kids your age to ride with.

It's not too expensive.

You could also call some stable in your area or put some ads out on craigslist and horse forums that you would work for riding privileges and/or lessons.
You might have to clean stalls, clean saddles,help feed but it's a way to ride for FREE and learn!

You shouldn't buy a horse until you learn more. Later if your parents won't help you can get a summer job or weekend job to earn money to buy one. Maybe if your parent see your serious about it they will help u out.

I'm sure there are places to board so your family does't have to move.
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post #17 of 20 Old 01-04-2015, 03:19 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dustyisace View Post
Welcome to the forum! Ok come on! As already mentioned I don't think you can make your dad move and find a new job (a bit selfish,) however, if you find yourself a riding stables you can learn to ride. Then I think you should get a part loan or ask a friend maybe if you can help her. Keep asking questions on here but always ask question at your stables. Read books, watch educational (horsey) films. Maybe in a biology class ask your teacher about a horses skeleton and body. You need to understand the signs of illness as well. If you do get a horse, maybe the stable your riding at will have a spare stable so you can get help, but remember it is costly. So I believe your question is what do I need? Well you need -
A fitting bridle to suit your horses strength so you don't get injured;

a martingale or breastplate if the horse throws his head up, or down;

a bit to suit your horse;

a saddle that fits the width of your horse;

Riding clothes (long socks, jods, polos, jumpers, coat and bodywarmers;)
a hat that fits and keeps you safe, I suggest a skull with a cap over the top;

Rugs - stable sheet, turnout, heavy and light, stable rug, heavy and light, a blanket, summer sheet, two fly rugs (horses can break these), exersize and competition sheet.

Boots- to protect your horses feet - Ride your horse because he may brush: brushing boots or other things so protect his legs!

Feed- choose the best feed for your horse.

High visibility stuff: Boots, tail bandages, exercise sheet, hat cover, jacket for you;

Bedding- Choose a suitable bedding, there's straw, shavings, shredded newspaper, rubber matting (I'd advise putting bedding over this), sand and others!

Riding boots - You need a pair of wellies and riding boots, keep your riding boots tip-top.

Grooming equipment- You need brushes, look up what you need and how to use them/groom a horse.

First aid - You need four types of bandages, spray and lotion/cream. You need wormers and look up the rest. I can admit my First Aid kit is pretty poor.

Vet and Farrier - The vet will check your horse, so keep his number handy in case your horse shows ANY, ANY AT ALL signs of illness! The farrier will come and do your horses feet, so depending on how much hacking you do you will need shoes or no shoes.

Luxury - After all this, now you can have luxury's for yourself. Personally I have only one luxury, a seatbone saver so make sure your horses needs are covered first!

Good Luck!
I would not advise a complete newbie who does not know much to go out and look for these things on your list other than buying appropriate riding apparel and a helmet. An illustrated horse book can show her more about horse anatomy than her biology teacher probably can. She needs to immerse herself in horse knowledge through lessons and camps. Buying a horse shouldn't even be on her immediate radar until she gains more knowledge about riding, care, general horse finances, etc.

People on Craigslist will likely not hire someone to work at their barn if they have no experience. Even just cleaning stalls efficiently is a skill learned through experience. Lugging around a heavy wheelbarrow is an art form within itself. My friend accidentally broke a wheelbarrow while working and the barn charged her $400 to replace it. A barn may hire you once you have gained enough experience to work.

Also, I don't know about her parent's financial stability but it is very selfish to try to whine your family into moving so you can have a horse or pressure your parents into taking on a financial burden they may not be capable of handling. I was one of those kids who begged and pleaded for a horse and was promised one by my parents who didn't know any better. They were struggling just to pay the bills and afford college for my other siblings and I didn't understand that back then because I was just a kid with "short term satisfaction goggles" on at the time. I took lessons and leased various horses for 8 years before I bought a horse of my own without support from my parents and still felt unprepared for horse ownership. I worked two jobs and still had difficulty affording the upkeep and let me tell you, I feared my cellphone because I was so worried I was going to get another "Your horse is colicking" or other bad news call.

The best advice is to take lessons with a reliable instructor. Enjoy learning all you can right now.
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post #18 of 20 Old 01-05-2015, 09:53 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Minnesota, USA
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I heard once that an average sized horse costs about $85 a month (if you don't board).When you include vet fees and the other things that come up (increase in hay prices for instance) it isn't a pretty sight.

Sometimes I wonder about all of us spending at least $1,000 on a horse every year.

All that being said, I do think that what horses can offer is a very valuable. Horses are unique and like to create bonds with people. That bond is a very special thing.

Find a stable or local person who has a horse. I know lots of horse people in my area (including me) who would love to let someone help out and ride and see what horses are really about.
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post #19 of 20 Old 01-12-2015, 08:30 AM
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canterklutz View Post
I would not advise a complete newbie who does not know much to go out and look for these things on your list other than buying appropriate riding apparel and a helmet. An illustrated horse book can show her more about horse anatomy than her biology teacher probably can. She needs to immerse herself in horse knowledge through lessons and camps. Buying a horse shouldn't even be on her immediate radar until she gains more knowledge about riding, care, general horse finances, etc.

People on Craigslist will likely not hire someone to work at their barn if they have no experience. Even just cleaning stalls efficiently is a skill learned through experience. Lugging around a heavy wheelbarrow is an art form within itself. My friend accidentally broke a wheelbarrow while working and the barn charged her $400 to replace it. A barn may hire you once you have gained enough experience to work.

Also, I don't know about her parent's financial stability but it is very selfish to try to whine your family into moving so you can have a horse or pressure your parents into taking on a financial burden they may not be capable of handling. I was one of those kids who begged and pleaded for a horse and was promised one by my parents who didn't know any better. They were struggling just to pay the bills and afford college for my other siblings and I didn't understand that back then because I was just a kid with "short term satisfaction goggles" on at the time. I took lessons and leased various horses for 8 years before I bought a horse of my own without support from my parents and still felt unprepared for horse ownership. I worked two jobs and still had difficulty affording the upkeep and let me tell you, I feared my cellphone because I was so worried I was going to get another "Your horse is colicking" or other bad news call.

The best advice is to take lessons with a reliable instructor. Enjoy learning all you can right now.
I understand where your coming from, but, when i was five I helped out at my barn and they taught me everything I know now. I then leased a horse and have my own now.
I agree though with your idea of an instructor.
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post #20 of 20 Old 01-12-2015, 12:15 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Southern IN
Posts: 941
• Horses: 6
Indianapolis likely has a few horse barns around, I believe there is a boarding stable in Avon, and likely a few more not far outside the 465 loop.

See if your folks are willing to take you out to one or 2 of these barns, and talk to the owner. Ask the owner if you can come out on a weekend day and help sweep aisles, and do odd jobs, don't expect to spend much time playing with horses. Stand back and observe, keep your mouth shut and see what others are doing. Once you have an Idea of who knows whats going on and who has decent horses, introduce your self and see if they would be willing to mentor you. Expect to start with grooming and cleaning tack and stalls, but continually work your way up. Remember you are there to learn, and there is more to horses than riding them.

Other than that READ, READ, READ. anything you can find, some of it will sound reasonable, some will sound ridiculous, learn to sort through it. Watch videos, but take them with a grain of salt.

Ultimately I think you know that your folks won't move and change jobs just so you can throw the extra expense of a horse at them, but by familiarizing your self with them, and learning what it takes to own one, you will have a better understanding of what you will need when you get to the point to make it happen.

Also horse tack is more or less specialized, as in fit and type, so there is no reason to buy anything, other than proper riding attire, and a good brain bucket (helmet).

Also about 30-45min west of you on I-70 in cloverdale there is the C bar C, they have several Equine vents a year there, lots of barrel racing as well as breed shows, it might be a fun family day for you and your mother to go hand out and watch some events there. Its all indoor and it is very nice.

Jim
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