I thought I was a rider - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 34 Old 11-03-2018, 03:41 AM
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I had, over many years, plenty of lessons from many top trainers. I worked professionally with horses, my forte being problem animals and would class myself as an experienced rider.

However, when I got on a naughty pony to 'sort it out' and it managed to get its head down and unable to buck because of my weight, managed to wriggle me out of the saddle!
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post #22 of 34 Old 11-03-2018, 07:30 AM
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I love the look of that open country @bsms ! I think Kodak would be happier if she could see a little further. We live on heavily wooded land and Kodak seems very fearful that there is something lurking behind every bush. Because there is. Not that most of those animals are dangerous, but they're everywhere. So yes, I think we're on the same page about the spooks. On the other hand, my new horse Rusty did see or hear something in the bushes on our 2 hour trail ride. The horse in front of me sort of shied sideways and they both stared. But trusty Rusty looked, and moved on. He is up-front and honest so if there's something that catches his interest, you know it right away. But then his "spooks" are kind of just a start. Kodak bottles things up so you can't see it coming. She shuts down. Then blows up.

Sorry to hijack the thread OP.
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post #23 of 34 Old 11-03-2018, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
I love the look of that open country

Sorry to hijack the thread OP.
Wow, me too. That looks like the kind of land where a horse could be really happy, and that looks like a happy horse!
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post #24 of 34 Old 11-03-2018, 09:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
I love the look of that open country

Sorry to hijack the thread OP.
Wow, me too. That looks like the kind of land where a horse could be really happy, and that looks like a happy horse!
Interesting, but that kind of country and work is what settled my guy into his existence. Suddenly if he wanted or needed to run we could- for about five miles. Makes them less ansy when they have that opportunity. Funny I think it was either Aristotle or Plato who said "the purpose of the horse is to run". And I think for their mental health he's not wrong.

On the being a rider and what it takes- anyone who is in the practice of swinging up on a horse and committing to do so better and better each time is a rider.

I have higher expectations of trainers, I like to laugh when Nick sends the wannabes soaring through the air.
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"Stay ON the horse IN the arena" -my trainer.
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post #25 of 34 Old 11-03-2018, 11:08 AM
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...On the being a rider and what it takes- anyone who is in the practice of swinging up on a horse and committing to do so better and better each time is a rider...
That is a very good definition.

My DIL stays on a calm horse. She likes riding. But she'll never be more than a barely adequate rider. I'm not a huge fan of live instruction. I live where the live instruction available is pretty poor. The one woman I respected has quit. So I understand not taking lessons.

But she will never read a book on riding. She won't watch a video. She has saddled a horse a few hundred times but often puts the saddle too far forward. She'll pick up the wrong bridle and put it in the horse's mouth and not notice the poor horse is either grinning like The Joker or has the bit banging his teeth. She has been known to saddle a horse with large bite marks on its back, not noticing the injuries - and then wonder why her horse was acting up. She has had lessons I paid for and didn't absorb much.

She's small, light and has the flexibility of youth. Our horses don't mind carrying her, and she's content to be carried as her horse follows Bandit. She's ridden a horse hundreds of times now - and knows about as much on how to ride as she did after her third ride. She's a fun person to ride with. Good-natured, cheerful, happy to be on a horse. The two horses she rides are happy to let Bandit lead them. They rely on Bandit to keep them safe. They'll bring her back in one piece unless she works to fall off - and she doesn't. After hundreds of rides, she is cargo. Stable cargo. She is happy that way and has no desire to learn more or do more on a horse. Two of our three horses are quite content to take care of her.

I don't understand. And she doesn't understand why I'll saddle up Bandit and practice something in our little arena. When it comes to riding horses, we might as well come from different planets. Sounds like the OP is determined to become a good rider. One who actively helps her horse. I'd love it if my DIL would follow her example, but I'm not going to hold my breath.

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #26 of 34 Old 11-03-2018, 12:46 PM
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Falling doesn't mean you aren't a rider! I have already been thrown 6 times in the few years that I have been riding! I have mostly fallen because of my own poor judgement and stupid mistakes but I've learned from it! For every time I have fallen I have learned something valuable
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Always get back on the horse.
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post #27 of 34 Old 11-04-2018, 07:38 AM
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From @bsms "They rely on Bandit to keep them safe. They'll bring her back in one piece unless she works to fall off - and she doesn't. After hundreds of rides, she is cargo. Stable cargo. She is happy that way and has no desire to learn more or do more on a horse. Two of our three horses are quite content to take care of her."


Bolding is mine. This can accurately describe many riders. My thought is that if they are aware that they are nothing more than stable cargo and choose to ride this way then so be it. And as long as you, their trail partner, recognize this and don't ask, insist or put them on a horse that feels the need to lead all can be right with the world. All "you" are general in nature.



I rode with the princess this summer. She insisted to the trail boss she was experienced and despite my whisperings to the contrary the TB put her on a horse that had a mind of his own. Nothing dangerous just a horse that needed direction and if you understood the fundamentals and followed the directives you had an enjoyable ride with a sense of accomplishment at the end. Without direction he either would not go or would not follow. With direction he happily plodded along and stayed in line. Let him be in charge and he had better things to do with his time. It took forever to get off the path from the barn to the trails as the princess' idea of riding is to simply sit and appear royal with the horse somehow magically just knowing what to do. Directions from both the trail boss and myself were ignored until the TB finally got off her horse and put her hand on the halter of the princess' ride to get him moving as putting a hand on the reins was tantamount to defying a royal decree (The princesses statement that she was a capable rider.) Before we hit the actual trails princess was removed from the "disobedient" mount and put on TB's horse who is quite happy to follow the leader with no direction from the rider and gave you a false sense of being a "real rider". The princess retained her imagine of being the best rider on the trail and we all breathed a sigh of relief. Her brother is not one to overstate his experience and is quite direct in what he wants out of a ride and was therefore placed on a mount suitable to not just his experience but his goals. All we heard on the ride home was how much better the ride would have been if she'd have been given "perfect pony" to begin with instead of "that evil monster".
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post #28 of 34 Old 11-04-2018, 08:20 AM
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Working in the first riding school where, in the summer, we had a lot of tourists ride, I became very astute at knowing whether people were riders or not.

Later at another school we had a group of Swedish teens on a school exchange booked to ride. Most were first time riders, though there was one girl who was correcting feet in the stirrups the wrong way, reins held incorrectly and giving (what I assumed as it was Swedish) advice.

She said she was experienced but the moment she was on the horse it was more than obvious she wasn't!

To cut a long story short she ended up taking a nasty fall because she was digging her heels into the horse she was riding and hanging onto its mouth very harshly. The mare just spun around in frustration and she fell heavily.

Luckily their teacher was with them and he knew enough to realise hat she had been fibbing with her experience and had ignored my instructions. Had she just let the mare have a loose rein all would have been fine.
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post #29 of 34 Old 11-07-2018, 07:34 PM
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If having fallen off means you are an expert, I was an expert by the age of 12. My pony probably dumped me 50 times the first year I had her. I was a stubborn kid, and I just got back on. I am now much harder to dump..

I also will not get on a horse that is acting like an idiot. I have no desire to break things. My horse may spook or bolt a few steps, but she pulls in easily. The one spill that I took off of her surprised her more than it did me.

Over the (many) years that I have been riding, I have taken dressage lessons, jumping lessons, western lessons, and done a lot of trail riding. All I am really interested in is trail riding. On a trail, anything can happen to scare a horse. But trail riding is what I love.

I would suggest not just sticking strictly to lessons, but get out and enjoy a nice ride in nature. That is my definition of riding.
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Celeste
Carpe Diem!
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post #30 of 34 Old 11-07-2018, 08:26 PM
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An old Cowboy told me once, "If you ride and havn't fallen off you are a novice, once you fall off you become an amateur."
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