Icy paddock solutions? - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 38 Old 01-17-2017, 09:00 PM
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Doesn't look too too bad but must say that driveway's pretty epic!

Told you they'd be fine :) Kodak says "I've got this"
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post #32 of 38 Old 01-19-2017, 06:54 AM
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Ok, I understand. Here we use mountain salt to melt the ice on the roads, hence it is safe for horses, since it is similar to the Himalayan salt (not with all those minerals, of course). That's why I didn't understand the issue.
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"Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend." - Camus
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post #33 of 38 Old 01-19-2017, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Vroni19 View Post
Ok, I understand. Here we use mountain salt to melt the ice on the roads, hence it is safe for horses, since it is similar to the Himalayan salt (not with all those minerals, of course). That's why I didn't understand the issue.
Ah, gotcha. I see you're in Italy! Yes, here in Canada, we use a mixture of salt and chemicals to melt the ice. I actually looked into the chemical composition of our road salt when I built our barn because there is a ditch that takes the runoff from the roadside onto our property and I wanted to know if that water would be safe for the horses to drink. It is not. That road salt is nasty. The deer do lick it, but I wouldn't want my horses doing so. Sounds like yours is much healthier, but then again, it's possible you don't require quite as much salt as we do here!
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post #34 of 38 Old 01-19-2017, 08:29 AM
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Your horse seems to understand the icy conditions and is working with it and with caution which is good and I think it is good to put them out every day, they will be aware of the conditions and not do something stupid.

A mare that I did not own but had the handling, training and showing for the first 9 yrs of her life, I would put my horses out in any weather and they knew the conditions and were smart about it.

Some time after she left my care, at the new place, there was bad weather and the horses were kept in for a few days and when they were turned out, they got running around the field and she hit a snowy patch that had ice underneath and she did the splits and broke her pelvis. She had to be put down.
I can't help but feel that if the horses were out every day this would not have happened. They would be aware of the danger areas and avoid them.
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post #35 of 38 Old 01-19-2017, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
Ah, gotcha. I see you're in Italy! Yes, here in Canada, we use a mixture of salt and chemicals to melt the ice. I actually looked into the chemical composition of our road salt when I built our barn because there is a ditch that takes the runoff from the roadside onto our property and I wanted to know if that water would be safe for the horses to drink. It is not. That road salt is nasty. The deer do lick it, but I wouldn't want my horses doing so. Sounds like yours is much healthier, but then again, it's possible you don't require quite as much salt as we do here!
I live in a mountain area, hence we do have ice quite often, but I don't think it is comparable to Canada! It must be hard to cohabit with the issue and "the solutions", such as the road salt. Best of luck!
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"Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend." - Camus
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post #36 of 38 Old 01-19-2017, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Woodhaven View Post
Your horse seems to understand the icy conditions and is working with it and with caution which is good and I think it is good to put them out every day, they will be aware of the conditions and not do something stupid.

A mare that I did not own but had the handling, training and showing for the first 9 yrs of her life, I would put my horses out in any weather and they knew the conditions and were smart about it.

Some time after she left my care, at the new place, there was bad weather and the horses were kept in for a few days and when they were turned out, they got running around the field and she hit a snowy patch that had ice underneath and she did the splits and broke her pelvis. She had to be put down.
I can't help but feel that if the horses were out every day this would not have happened. They would be aware of the danger areas and avoid them.
Wow, what a tragic outcome! You never know I guess, but I tend to agree that horses that are out all the time are more "street smart". We got some snow last night (about 4 inches, not much) and this morning, the horses clearly knew the footing would be different. They put their noses down to the ground and carefully tested the ground before walking out to the feeding stations. Frankly, the snow hasn't helped much with the ice - it just created a more slippery surface as you would have known had you seen my car doing "s" shapes in my driveway this morning! Luckily, most of the paddock was covered with sawdust before the snow came so the horses have a safe surface to walk on. I look forward to getting rid of it for good, but that won't likely happen until April.
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post #37 of 38 Old 01-19-2017, 07:51 PM
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we've gotten quite a bit of snow, then the horses compact it to ice which isn't bad until we got the warm and rain that it sounds like you guys got.

lucky for me main customer canceled yesterday so i got to figure out how to get the girls out of the barn:

if you live in a dairy area, go to the local feed/supply store and ask about "surefoot" if you don't have a pile of sand it's a cheap coarse (lime stone?) product that works quite well on ice.

if it's a sacrifice paddock that you know isn't going to be growing stuff you could get a pile of stone dumped in the driveway in the fall, cover it with a tarp and use the peastone to provide traction
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post #38 of 38 Old 01-19-2017, 08:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by tim62988 View Post
we've gotten quite a bit of snow, then the horses compact it to ice which isn't bad until we got the warm and rain that it sounds like you guys got.

lucky for me main customer canceled yesterday so i got to figure out how to get the girls out of the barn:

if you live in a dairy area, go to the local feed/supply store and ask about "surefoot" if you don't have a pile of sand it's a cheap coarse (lime stone?) product that works quite well on ice.

if it's a sacrifice paddock that you know isn't going to be growing stuff you could get a pile of stone dumped in the driveway in the fall, cover it with a tarp and use the peastone to provide traction
Thanks! Never heard of surefoot. Will ask about it! There are quite a few dairy farms around.

We're already planning for next winter. This was our first with the horses at home so it's a lot of trial and error! I think we will get a pile of sand or even dirt near the barn to sprinkle on as needed. Or fill some barrels with it or something. Lots of places we can get the stuff free in the summer (we have a 185 acre woodlots with abandoned pits on it), we just can't get to those places this time of year!

I'd rather not kill all the grass, but I don't know how much of it will actually grow this year either. I don't expect to use it as a food source, obviously, but the roots prevent the land from getting muddy and eroded. That said, it if turns into a total mud bog, the peastone may be a more permanent solution anyway.
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