If a horse wants to look at something it's scared of, do you let him? - Page 6 - The Horse Forum
 109Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #51 of 82 Old 03-17-2015, 04:19 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Middle-of-Nowhere, Illinois
Posts: 2,225
• Horses: 1
I let my horse check things out when he's scared, but I don't reward him when he stops being scared. I've found that if you act casual and think nothing of whatever is scaring the horse, they pick up on it and soon they'll think nothing of it, either.

My dad had his pontoon boat parked in the driveway one time, and of course, anything large and shiny must be a horse-eating monster. I led my horse over to it and let him touch it, then he was fine. And my horse is the biggest chicken on the planet, so that's saying something.
Textan49 likes this.

"A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is ultimately to be at peace with himself.
What a man can be, he must be.
" Abraham Maslow, 1968
Jessabel is offline  
post #52 of 82 Old 03-18-2015, 01:44 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: I'm an American girl living in southwest France
Posts: 1,563
• Horses: 6
I haven't read all the responses here, so maybe someone's already mentioned this, but Cherie has a sticky thread "How We Train Fearless Trail Horses" or something like that with her methods that are proven and work. Look at the top of the main forum threads and you'll see it there as a permanent post.

For me, I do let my horse look sometimes because it's in her nature to be curious. But if I sense she's being overly cautious, like spooky just because she's had too much grain, then no, I push her on.

Just like I parent my kids: if they're having a bad day because they don't feel well, I let their antics slide, but if they're being buttheads because they woke up on the wrong side of the bed, they don't get a free pass. I can usually tell when it's my horse being overly sensitive or if she has a legit question about what's going on in the bushes or ahead or whatever.

The problem with letting them look at everything is you can end up taking forever to go anywhere, so you do have to draw the line somewhere.

As Cherie recommends, when my horse does spook, I make her walk back and forth in front of the spooky spot several times until she can walk by without reacting. Sometimes it takes a long time, other times just a few passes. The more times you do that, the less often they will spook. They start to learn that they have way too many false alarms or they start ignoring the things that turned out to be false alarms in the past.
weedlady and Textan49 like this.

“When I bestride him, I soar, I am a hawk: he trots the air; the earth sings when he touches it; the basest horn of his hoof is more musical than the pipe of Hermes. ” ~ William Shakespeare
ecasey is offline  
post #53 of 82 Old 03-18-2015, 06:38 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 522
• Horses: 0
Well I had my horse look at some thin scary and look at it for like 15 seconds then did a 1 80 buck 2 times them me. So I just think you should just walk by it.
Luv equins is offline  
post #54 of 82 Old 03-18-2015, 10:59 PM
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ontario
Posts: 17,293
• Horses: 0
As Smilie says, you want your horse's focus on the rider, not the object. If the rider looks where she thinks the horse is looking, it confirms in the horse's mind that there must be something worrisome over there. Ask the horse to move on perhaps turning away from it's source of concern to get it's mind back on the rider.



Saddlebag is offline  
post #55 of 82 Old 03-19-2015, 01:39 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: SW Michigan
Posts: 1,537
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159 View Post
It depends on the individual horse and individual situation.

Red does not get to stand and look, usually. He's the type of horse that used to bolt if you let him stop and stare. You have to keep his feet moving and keep his attention off the object.

Shotgun can stand and look all he wants. He will also move forward at any time if I ask him. He does better confidence-wise if I let him take his time and investigate.

Even with my own two horses, I do completely different things with them because they tespond and learn differently.

So I say it depends!
Posted via Mobile Device
In general I firmly believe in teaching a horse to trust my judgement and to move forward when asked. But the above point is very valid, in all regards. My new guy (when do I stop calling him "new?") is nearly four but is very green, so when we are out and about we walk on through his reactive responses, and/or I act as if nothing is going on and ignore his antics.

But when we are trailer training, for example, I will not pressure him but allow him to approach and sniff and smell on his own. I will not allow him to run away, but I certainly don't expect him (at this stage) to just get on.
greenhaven is offline  
post #56 of 82 Old 03-19-2015, 01:52 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: East Central Illinois
Posts: 7,135
• Horses: 3
Julie Goodnight had a recent program about desensitizing a horse to film cameras, lights, reflectors, etc. She used her personnel to mimic the human actions that frighten a horse and encouraged the horse to investigate the scary objects, and the horse became used to the items and the humans approaching quickly and all around this mare.
I always train my horses to know that it is acceptable to shy from anything scary. I do NOT accept any rearing and bolting. As long as my horse believes that he Can escape, but is willing to listen, I am satisfied.
Really, with something that causes a horse to move 200 feet away from to pass, you should find another horse owner whose horse is blasse and not at all bothered by the scary object and let the other horse give YOURS confidence by riding past it and let you frightened horse be on the outside. This is how the US Cavalry broke in their green horses, WE used it to break in our own horses, and I broke 15 horses to CW Reenacting, gunfire and crowds successfully and QUICKLY in this way. Hope this helps. =D
Textan49 likes this.

A Jack and Three Queens, the latest book by James C. Dedman, Amazon.com
Hope that you fall in love with "Trot", like I did! https://www.horseforum.com/general-of...queens-617793/
Corporal is offline  
post #57 of 82 Old 03-19-2015, 04:09 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: SW Michigan
Posts: 1,537
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal View Post
I always train my horses to know that it is acceptable to shy from anything scary. I do NOT accept any rearing and bolting. As long as my horse believes that he Can escape, but is willing to listen, I am satisfied.
I am not trying to be a butt, but I can think of at least one instance where a shying horse nearly killed a good friend of mine. Well-broke horse, very experienced rider, but the horse shied right off a cliff face. Friend was lucky to survive but had to be airlifted off the mountain.

Granted, dumb stuff just happens sometimes, but I would be hard-pressed to allow my mount to think shying is okay.
updownrider and Textan49 like this.
greenhaven is offline  
post #58 of 82 Old 03-19-2015, 07:44 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 522
• Horses: 0
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
In case nobody wants to read that entire article, I think this part explains very well well the natural self preservation that is the foundation of that horse balking and staring, and then how respect and trust, not a bit, over rides that instinctive reaction;

SELF PRESERVATION
Trust – Respect - Communication

Notice that I put Self Preservation above all else and in bold block letters. That is because nature put it above all else in the horse's DNA. There is nothing that we can do to change that fact. When a horse becomes confused, frightened, excited, threatened, etc., he automatically switches from being left brained to right brained and Self Preservation kicks in. The need for fight or flight comes from his right brain. Logic goes right out the window when the switching of brain sides occurs. This is who he is as a prey animal and his very existence relies on Self Preservation being the number one thing in his life.


The first responsibility that falls on the human is Trust . It is the essential building block that all horse/human relationships, and partnerships, are built upon. Before anything else, a horse must first have to trust you to truly give of himself and ignore his instinctual Self Preservation .
The second responsibility that a human has to shoulder is earning Respect. Now there are a lot of similarities between Trust and Respect when dealing with a horse. The two almost have to go hand in hand. If you stop and think about it, you really can't have Trust without having Respect . They each are byproducts of one another. First a horse has to learn to Trust you. You earn the Trust by teaching him that, as his leader, you will not lead him into harm nor abuse him. His best care is in your hands. With this, he learns to Respect you. The more he Respects you, the more he will Trust you…and the more he Trusts you, the more he will Respect you. It takes TIME (training principle #1) to earn and create a relationship built on Trust and Respect…however...it literally only takes about 2 seconds to completely destroy the Trust and Respect and thereby destroying the relationship.


The last responsibility that humans must shoulder is Communication . I find that in most cases, problems occur when there is a break down in Communication between horse and human. I will tell you in plain English right now that when it comes to miscommunication it is always the human's fault. We tend to be rather ego-centric and almost demand that every being understand our spoken language, intent, body language, thoughts, emotions, etc. Somehow we expect all to conform to human way of understanding. But horses don't think like we do. It is we humans who need to change our thought processes in order to better Communicate with horses.





TRUST – RESPECT – COMMUNICATION
Self Preservation
..


Truly, if horses never lie,
then this is proof that...
BitsDO NOT control horses !!!
Bits do not control horses! Your so right!
Luv equins is offline  
post #59 of 82 Old 03-19-2015, 09:04 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Williams, Arizona
Posts: 5,651
• Horses: 0
Horses Never Lie is my favorite horse book. Read a few times.

And a favorite saying is, "A horse does not care how much you know, until it knows how much you care". That saying goes right along with the article.

The Mustang has no place in modern society. The Mustang belongs either free on the range or in a forever caring home.
Hondo is online now  
post #60 of 82 Old 03-20-2015, 02:30 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,295
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal View Post
Julie Goodnight had a recent program about desensitizing a horse to film cameras, lights, reflectors, etc. She used her personnel to mimic the human actions that frighten a horse and encouraged the horse to investigate the scary objects, and the horse became used to the items and the humans approaching quickly and all around this mare.
I always train my horses to know that it is acceptable to shy from anything scary. I do NOT accept any rearing and bolting. As long as my horse believes that he Can escape, but is willing to listen, I am satisfied.
Really, with something that causes a horse to move 200 feet away from to pass, you should find another horse owner whose horse is blasse and not at all bothered by the scary object and let the other horse give YOURS confidence by riding past it and let you frightened horse be on the outside. This is how the US Cavalry broke in their green horses, WE used it to break in our own horses, and I broke 15 horses to CW Reenacting, gunfire and crowds successfully and QUICKLY in this way. Hope this helps. =D
Sometimes another horse can be a better teacher than a rider can be.
Corporal likes this.
Textan49 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Scared Horse? Help! Princessa Horse Talk 14 04-21-2014 10:22 PM
Scared of my horse Justginger Horse Talk 16 01-22-2014 07:44 PM
My horse is scared of everything! Sissy Horse Training 18 02-04-2013 07:53 AM
New horse scared of me katie1118 Horse Training 11 10-10-2012 05:46 AM
When a horse is scared... dynamite. Horse Training 17 02-04-2010 09:30 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome