Inherited horse, Newbie here - The Horse Forum
 57Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:02 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Mukwonago, WI
Posts: 26
• Horses: 0
Inherited horse, Newbie here

So we had horses when I was a kid. I'm now 38. I inherited a horse when my grandfather recently passed. I put up some fencing on about 4 acres, ran power and water to the pasture and put up a shelter. He is a 2 year old Andalusian. I was told from the previous caregiver that he has been on green pasture for 2 months so I don't need to restrict him on grass. But I am still worried because my pasture has not had horses on it so the grass is a foot tall in some places. Other places it is thinner and shorter. As I research more and more I see talks on colic and problems with grasses. Even though I was told to not worry about restricting him I am. He arrived Saturday and seems to love the grass. Is it better to leave it long and let him take it down or should I mow the pasture to limit his intake? I also read that the dangerous parts and high energy can come from the roots, so I don't want to mow it if it will give easier access to the roots and make it easier to have a problem. Any inside is appreciated.

Also any other newbie tips would be great. Being around so many horses when I was younger I felt fine accepting him but I realized now that he has arrived that I don't feel nearly as confident! No tip is too silly as I feel like I know nothing despite taking care of horses for many years as a teen.
AnitaAnne and Spanish Rider like this.
Todd Regal is offline  
post #2 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:10 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: middle of nowhere
Posts: 2,922
• Horses: 3
If it's been a couple of days and he's ok, he'll likely be fine, but Andalusians tend to be easy keepers and 24/7 grazing may mean an obese horse shortly. Longer grasses are fine for horses-- higher in fiber and lower in sugar. As he grazes it down, you'll notice that his favorite areas are cropped short, and other areas he won't touch-- then you mow everything off to even things out.

Can you cross-fence his grazing area? This will allow you to graze half the space and rest the other part, then mow off the grazed area and keep him off of it until it regrows while he uses the other half. This is also handy for when you have to spray weeds, etc. A corral or pen around the shelter/food area for when you do want to restrict his grazing is never a bad idea. Some pipe panels are easy to put up, he won't mess with them, and they can be moved around if needed. A smaller area needs better fencing than a larger area. Prop the gate(s) open when he's out in the pasture, then shut him in with some hay when he's not. In Wisconsin, you'll want to be able to keep him off the pasture in the late fall when the grass is dying, and the early spring when everything is mud. It's also a good idea to keep horses off pasture when it's stressed--- the first couple of weeks of frost in the fall, etc.

If you don't know his medical history, schedule a vet visit for your new guy to get him his vaccinations and have his teeth checked and parasite load checked. Congrats on your new friend! I'd love to see pictures of him
SilverMaple is offline  
post #3 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:21 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Virginia
Posts: 115
• Horses: 0
Though my horse (and I think most horses when given the option) prefer medium or shorter grass, I've never had a problem with tall grass itself, but what is in it. Mowing is not necessary, but I think it is good for general pasture maintenance. It helps with the ticks a little, gives you a good survey of the land incase there are any holes, and it is easier to manage the manure.
RegalCharm and AnitaAnne like this.

"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." - Confucius

Last edited by LoonWatcher; 05-20-2019 at 12:31 PM. Reason: Grammar. Some text removal.
LoonWatcher is offline  
post #4 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:25 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Mukwonago, WI
Posts: 26
• Horses: 0
I can certainly cross fence the pasture off, I may even do three sections. Thats a good tip. I asked a coworker that lives in the area for his vet's number, he said he will send it to me. I'd like to have them out. I'm glad the long grasses aren't an issue. I just went outside and he was laying down, I immediately freaked out and called the previous caregiver and he said he does that, he is still healing from a previous leg injury and he said he often lays down to rest it. He had a very active day yesterday running and playing with my kids. Hopefully his leg is just sore. That was really scary though. I went up to him and he seems calm, he let me touch him without issues and he immediately checked my pockets for treats while he way laying down. I am now of course researching now and I see people say monitor temp and pulse. I'm going to figure out how to do that and go buy whatever tools necessary. I never remember doing that in the past but seems like a great skill to know and access. If my coworker doesn't respond with the Vet's number this afternoon I will try to find one on my own and get them out here just to make sure he is good.
Todd Regal is offline  
post #5 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:29 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Mukwonago, WI
Posts: 26
• Horses: 0
Thanks loon. I usually mow this field 3 times per year in the past before the horse. I know the terrain really well and I am confident there are no holes, rocks, etc. It has been raining here a lot lately so the ground is a little soft, luckily my land dries quickly but stays soft for 12 hours after rain and it has been raining every day and the forecast looks like that will continue this week. I feel, and I could be wrong that the long grass will help preserve the pasture at this point, once we get past the spring rains I think it would be no issue mowing it as it will be drier. But I feel like if I mow it today it will get much more beat up by him for the next few days and turn into more of a muddy mess.
RegalCharm likes this.
Todd Regal is offline  
post #6 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:34 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Mukwonago, WI
Posts: 26
• Horses: 0
He did get sprayed for ticks yesterday and I have not seen any ticks here yet this year and I have spent a lot of time in the area putting up this pasture the last few weeks. I also have two other small horse on the property that came yesterday, they are a friend of mine's horses, but they are kept penned and only coming out 2 hours per day at this point. So I think the whole pasture will be mowed down pretty quick by them. One of the other two is also 2 years old and they ran a lot yesterday and played, so I am hoping the Andalusian is just sore today as his previous caregiver has suggested.
RegalCharm likes this.
Todd Regal is offline  
post #7 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:40 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Virginia
Posts: 115
• Horses: 0
I agree with @SilverMaple about a vet - both for general health and his leg.

Has a vet, be it a previous or current, said anything about his leg injury? Is he lame at all? Since he is still healing, if possible, try not to let him run and play all wildly. No hoof (leg), no horse, as they say. I understand that younger horses tend to lay down more, but if it is bad enough for him to be constantly laying down, then him running on it sounds kind of dangerous, even if he is not currently lame.
RegalCharm likes this.

"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." - Confucius
LoonWatcher is offline  
post #8 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:45 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 39
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
If you don't know his medical history, schedule a vet visit for your new guy to get him his vaccinations and have his teeth checked and parasite load checked. Congrats on your new friend! I'd love to see pictures of him
My thoughts too! Get a good rapport with a local vet and have 'em out to see your new guy, and your property, and ask loads of questions! I always feel more comfortable with having a vet relationship as I get started with a new horse. It's good for them to come out and check out your horse before there's something wrong to help them get a good baseline. You seem super well meaning too! This horse was lucky to end up with you! It sounds like you're giving him a fantastic new life!

And as SilverMaple said... share pics!!! <3 (and welcome to the forum!)
RegalCharm likes this.

💗 When you give to your horse, they give back to you in the most amazing ways 💗
Countess is offline  
post #9 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Mukwonago, WI
Posts: 26
• Horses: 0
Todd Regal is offline  
post #10 of 42 Old 05-20-2019, 01:00 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Mukwonago, WI
Posts: 26
• Horses: 0
I uploaded a couple pics to an album above. Those were from the last couple days at my place. Unfortunately the previous caregiver is always "in a hurry" when I catch him on the phone. I just called him again with growing concern and he assured me not to worry and that he does that. He said he will ge the his old Vet's number that was working on his injury and I can call and discuss it with him. Waiting on that. I didn't notice any odd limp the first few day but last night before dark i did notice that leg was not carrying weight, I assume he was sore from the exercise yesterday. I think this afternoon I will cross section about a 1/4th of the pasture off to limit his running until the vet gets out.
Todd Regal is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Inherited a Horse and need some help with his behaviors Hanksmom Horse Training 15 09-08-2013 07:42 PM
Inherited an old 1984 F-150, no power steering. Can I change that? LovesMyDunnBoy Cars and Trucks 14 08-04-2012 01:42 PM
Inherited Pregnant Mare MCHorsePower Horse Breeding 8 09-27-2011 08:00 PM
Inherited a clock Lucara General Off Topic Discussion 5 05-14-2010 06:19 PM
I inherited a horse, what should I do? aloh327 Horse Talk 1 03-21-2010 05:16 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome