I've heard of spoiled horses - but how about spoiled owners? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 07:30 AM Thread Starter
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I've heard of spoiled horses - but how about spoiled owners?

The spoiled owner being me. I haven't handled many horses since I bought my mare a year ago.

Boy, did I get a reality check today. Due to circumstances, I helped turn out a whole bunch of other people's horses. I was pushed, pulled, barged around with, trampled and one notable little git bit me. Well, he tried, he couldn't quite latch on before I rained some blows on his uppity little nose.

My mare is a saint. Really gentle and well mannered so I forgot how to properly handle horses. With a crop in one hand and a snarl as soon as I walk into a box. Sheesh!

I really don't understand why people put up with such behavior. I mean, riding is supposed to be pleasant, not a stressful event every time you handle your horse. And, no, these aren't racehorses or show jumpers you put up with because of their talent. Bog standard leisure horses.
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post #2 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 08:11 AM
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I get you! My horses aren't perfect and have occasionally acted up. Usually due to an unforeseen outside influence. But it doesn't take much more than a harsh word and firm attitude to bring them around.

Too many people find it easier to make excuses for their horses than to discipline them.
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post #3 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 08:16 AM
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Well, I just lost a long post#%^*+*^%#.

Don't blame the horses, blame their owners, for a number of different reasons. I grow weary of listening to people talk about "their baby" and how it isn't the same horse they bought six months ago --- whose fault is that---------

One of my horses is 22 and has been with me 20 years. He is about the oneriest/conniving cuss I have ever owned. He has had more lacings in 20 years than all of my other horses put together.

These last few years, the worst I have to do is crack the buggy whip on the ground to get him back in line but I can promise you, he would be one those ill-mannered horses you describe, if I didn't stay on top of his behavior every single day, lollol.

99% of the time, I know what he is going to do before he does it. I can tell by the look in his eyes which side of the sawdust he work up on, lollol

He is a very smart horse but he has his own agenda, worse than any horse I have ever owned, lollol. I am sure he was put in my care and keeping to humble me, lollollol
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post #4 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 08:32 AM Thread Starter
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Don't get me wrong, my mare isn't a zombie, she needs occasional reminders. But a full out bite? She would be stomped into the ground and she knows it. I'm not some crop-wielding monster, I'm a green as grass novice so it's not like you need some expert equestrian knowledge to keep them in line. And I do understand that there are difficult horses but not a barn-full of them, surely not?

If I couldn't get her in line on my own, I'd get expert help. I just would not put up with a half a ton of flesh being rude, one way or the other.

Then again, I was just thinking these horses may behave for their owners, but not for me. I'll keep an eye out, maybe I was doing something wrong.
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post #5 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 08:55 AM
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I find the same thing when it comes to riding. I typically only ride my mare. I warmed up one of my friends retired roping horses a few weeks ago and...wow. First, it felt like I was trying to straddle a twin mattress. Second, no power steering, third, the trot was like a jack hammer.

It really made me appreciate my little mare and I will definitely think twice before I start complaining about her "making me work."
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post #6 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 08:58 AM
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Whenever I start out with a new horse (my own or someone else's) I have a firm but fair guide line and procedure system. I am consistent with this and usually the horse accepts this (might take a little convincing with some bad actors), then after some time after things are well established I usually relax the rules a bit and if they do try something just a sharp word is enough. HOrses have different characteristics and personalities and you have to work with each horse according to their personality, such as Walkinthewalk stated with her one horse, you have to keep on top of him constantly for good behaviour, some horses will just keep on trying to get their own way.

If I am working with a young horse or a project horse I want him to have good manners and be people friendly and willing to do as asked because I firmly believe that this horse will find a better home if he is pleasant to be around. A horse that is badly behaved and unwilling, the owner will not want to spend time with a horse like this and then the horse gets neglected and/or sold on. I have seen this happen often even with good horses that are not handled properly and allowed to get away with things.

Being too kind to a horse is not always the best thing for that horse.
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post #7 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 09:08 AM
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You just reminded me that we went through a phase with Harley last fall where he would try to bite me whenever I led him to the indoor where we were boarding. It was bad enough that I wouldn't let my daughter lead him even though he's her horse. I even started a thread on it! Had sort of forgotten about it. At the time, I was advised to elbow him in the mouth. It went away completely. Never been a problem again. And now my daughter can catch him, tack him up, lead him to the mounting block and start riding while I finish tacking up Kodak.

Bottom line is that while some horses are gentle souls who always give you space and act kindly on the ground (Kodak), others will always test you to see how much the can get away with. Harley will always be more mouthy and food aggressive so he has to be reminded of his manners regularly. Yet kids can pet him and ride him (on a lead rope) without a problem because he knows I'm watching.
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post #8 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 09:13 AM
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Yeah, some people don't discipline properly, therefore the horse feels like they can basically do whatever they want. I'm not saying horses don't act up sometimes, but for the most part your horse should know better LOL. I know some are harder to 'train' than others though. Some horses are just buttheads.
Doesn't stand with me though, the horse needs to respect me. I can't stand that. You should always demand respect from your horse & you can't let them get away with everything because they'll never learn. Ground manners are super important! Wish more people realized that. I'm glad you didn't get too hurt though. The horse definitely needs to learn, hey, I need to listen to him/her & I need to have good manners. One of the major factors in horse ownership!
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post #9 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 09:29 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by PoptartShop View Post
Yeah, some people don't discipline properly, therefore the horse feels like they can basically do whatever they want. I'm not saying horses don't act up sometimes, but for the most part your horse should know better LOL. I know some are harder to 'train' than others though. Some horses are just buttheads.
Doesn't stand with me though, the horse needs to respect me. I can't stand that. You should always demand respect from your horse & you can't let them get away with everything because they'll never learn. Ground manners are super important! Wish more people realized that. I'm glad you didn't get too hurt though. The horse definitely needs to learn, hey, I need to listen to him/her & I need to have good manners. One of the major factors in horse ownership!
I didn't get hurt at all, thanks - except for my pride :) After the first one I gathered my wits, got a crop and a growl and I somehow got through it. I will not be repeating the excersise any time soon. Very unpleasant.

Not all of them were naughty, those ones I can and will help with in future.
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post #10 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 09:37 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Woodhaven View Post
Whenever I start out with a new horse (my own or someone else's) I have a firm but fair guide line and procedure system. I am consistent with this and usually the horse accepts this (might take a little convincing with some bad actors), then after some time after things are well established I usually relax the rules a bit and if they do try something just a sharp word is enough. HOrses have different characteristics and personalities and you have to work with each horse according to their personality, such as Walkinthewalk stated with her one horse, you have to keep on top of him constantly for good behaviour, some horses will just keep on trying to get their own way.

If I am working with a young horse or a project horse I want him to have good manners and be people friendly and willing to do as asked because I firmly believe that this horse will find a better home if he is pleasant to be around. A horse that is badly behaved and unwilling, the owner will not want to spend time with a horse like this and then the horse gets neglected and/or sold on. I have seen this happen often even with good horses that are not handled properly and allowed to get away with things.

Being too kind to a horse is not always the best thing for that horse.
I agree wholeheartedly. One of the reasons I chose my mare in the first place. One of the horses I tried out was nicer to ride but a git on the ground, had to be lead with a chain. No thanks. I realise this can be fixed, but I don't have enough experience and guts to deal with it. And it just made me dislike his personality.

I've also noticed that school horses which get tacked up by students get bargy and rude. I suppose they try their luck, get away with it enough times, and presto - rude horse. The clever ones behave when the instructor is around and play up when there is no "discipline" around :)
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