I've heard of spoiled horses - but how about spoiled owners? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 10:46 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jenkat86 View Post
I find the same thing when it comes to riding. I typically only ride my mare. I warmed up one of my friends retired roping horses a few weeks ago and...wow. First, it felt like I was trying to straddle a twin mattress. Second, no power steering, third, the trot was like a jack hammer.

It really made me appreciate my little mare and I will definitely think twice before I start complaining about her "making me work."
Eh, mine isn't that great to ride but we are getting there. Trott like a jack hammer, power steering towards the gate only :)

I like her as a person and she isn't dangerous, what more can I ask for? :)
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post #12 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 11:06 AM
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A friend of mine who works as a groom for grand prix dressage horses, often going to big shows and 'doing for' a number of contestants, told me that most of the horses are very ill-mannered on the ground. These are extremely expensive horses given the utmost in care, and yet they are rude boors. What gives with that?

A horse trainer I know told me she usually could tell why the horse was being brought in for training by how it led off the trailer.
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post #13 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 11:18 AM Thread Starter
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A friend of mine who works as a groom for grand prix dressage horses, often going to big shows and 'doing for' a number of contestants, told me that most of the horses are very ill-mannered on the ground. These are extremely expensive horses given the utmost in care, and yet they are rude boors. What gives with that?
I'm not sure. I've been around racehorses and they are usually awful. It's like their handlers aren't even trying to get them to behave. Maybe it's some sort of machismo. Or they genuinely don't notice it, being around horses their whole lives and focusing on performance only. I suppose if it's your livelihood, you most probably don't have time to faff around with a dually halter and to twirl rope at it at. Slap a chain on it and get on with training. Dunno.
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post #14 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 11:34 AM
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I'm not sure. I've been around racehorses and they are usually awful. It's like their handlers aren't even trying to get them to behave. Maybe it's some sort of machismo. Or they genuinely don't notice it, being around horses their whole lives and focusing on performance only. I suppose if it's your livelihood, you most probably don't have time to faff around with a dually halter and to twirl rope at it at. Slap a chain on it and get on with training. Dunno.
Well, at least racehorses have the excuse that they are mostly very young, and all they need to do is get into that box and then run for dear life. Nobody expects them to be cultured riding horses.

It's clearly part of that horse culture. Like, "our horses are too important/sensitive/hot to teach ground manners to. Or maybe, I'm too important to spend non-riding time with my horse teaching it respect.

I don't know either but the high-level -dressage community went down yet another notch in my estimation when I heard that. It was not a casual observation, she has been grooming for dressage shows for many years now.

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post #15 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 11:40 AM Thread Starter
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Well, at least racehorses have the excuse that they are mostly very young, and all they need to do is get into that box and then run for dear life. Nobody expects them to be cultured riding horses.

It's clearly part of that horse culture. Like, "our horses are too important/sensitive/hot to teach ground manners to. Or maybe, I'm too important to spend non-riding time with my horse teaching it respect.

I don't know either but the high-level -dressage community went down yet another notch in my estimation when I heard that. It was not a casual observation, she has been grooming for dressage shows for many years now.
I remember one notable incident: a jockey (judging by stature, a tiny guy) was leading a rather large boy who decided he had enough, lifted his head, along with the jockey and went for a trot. The guy was so angry, he was literally spitting and occasionally touching ground with his tippy-toes. He never let go, though. The funny part was that he never let go of the beer he had in his other hand either. Not a drop was spilled that day.
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post #16 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 12:01 PM
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Unfortunately, you are "preaching to the choir" here. It's the amateur owners who need the training so that they know the proper response to bad behaviors-most don't really know or care .

It's one of my pet peeves to hear an owner talking about "sending the horse off to a trainer" and then ending up with the same problems when the horse comes back. They invested plenty of money but no time in learning what that trainer does to correct the horse. As in dog obedience training, first it's the owner that has to be trained, then the dog. It doesn't take a horse long to learn to be polite and respectful with a good handler and then quickly revert back to old, bad behaviors back home with the sloppy ones.

It's sort of like me deciding that I want to own an elephant. So I send my elephant "off to the trainer" but don't bother to get involved in the process other than writing a check.
How long do you think I would live when that elephant comes back to me?
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post #17 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 12:07 PM Thread Starter
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Unfortunately, you are "preaching to the choir" here. It's the amateur owners who need the training so that they know the proper response to bad behaviors-most don't really know or care .

It's one of my pet peeves to hear an owner talking about "sending the horse off to a trainer" and then ending up with the same problems when the horse comes back. They invested plenty of money but no time in learning what that trainer does to correct the horse. As in dog obedience training, first it's the owner that has to be trained, then the dog. It doesn't take a horse long to learn to be polite and respectful with a good handler and then quickly revert back to old, bad behaviors back home with the sloppy ones.

It's sort of like me deciding that I want to own an elephant. So I send my elephant "off to the trainer" but don't bother to get involved in the process other than writing a check.
How long do you think I would live when that elephant comes back to me?
Ha! I wonder if there are any elephant handling forums online. That would be a blast! "My elephant doesn't respect me, what should I do?" :)

But, on a more serious note, I AM an amateur owner. That's precisely why I wouldn't dare let my horse be rude. All well and good for professionals to let things slide, they have a sixth sense (ie. decades of experience) around horses which keeps them safe. I can't afford that.
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post #18 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Avna View Post
A friend of mine who works as a groom for grand prix dressage horses, often going to big shows and 'doing for' a number of contestants, told me that most of the horses are very ill-mannered on the ground. These are extremely expensive horses given the utmost in care, and yet they are rude boors. What gives with that?
Breeding. Temperament is not the most important trait as long as the horse performs well. I have seen the bunch, big Warmbloods that are like steam engines and no contact or respect whatsoever on the other end of the rope. Some horses that come to the (retirement) livery however can be first like this and after some time when they get to chill a bit, they're more mellow and easy to deal with. I'm all for good ground manners and don't generally take bs, but I'm also aware of how a stressful environment and wrong nutrition can affect the horse's behaviour.
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Last edited by Fimargue; 12-22-2016 at 01:37 PM.
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post #19 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 01:41 PM
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A horse trainer I know told me she usually could tell why the horse was being brought in for training by how it led off the trailer.
My vet says the same thing in regards to sedation
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post #20 of 56 Old 12-22-2016, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Fimargue View Post
Breeding. Temperament is not the most important trait as long as the horse performs well. I have seen the bunch, big Warmbloods that are like steam engines and no contact or respect whatsoever on the other end of the rope. Some horses that come to the (retirement) livery however can be first like this and after some time when they get to chill a bit, they're more mellow and easy to deal with. I'm all for good ground manners and don't generally take bs, but I'm also aware of how a stressful environment and wrong nutrition can affect the horse's behaviour.
That actually makes a lot of sense.
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