I've heard of spoiled horses - but how about spoiled owners? - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 56 Old 12-23-2016, 12:02 PM
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As a vet tech, I encounter dog owners that have no idea how to control their 'fur babies'. They think its cute that Fido is bouncing all over the place, jumping on everyone, trying to lick faces, and even marking corners, etc. Ive been bitten by a few dogs that the owner just chuckled and thought it was funny that Fido doesn't like me. At my house, I'm the alpha. I expect my 4 dogs to have manners at home and on outings. When they misbehave and they hear me screech, everyone stands at attention!!
SO, when I got my horse about a month ago, of course he has got to test the waters to find out what he can get away with. My screeching doesn't mean squat to Buckshot. A flick on the nose does. I'm struggling with the level of discipline to use with him. I grew up learning that spanking was the way to discipline. Ive gotten yelled at by the neighbor when our 5 yo boys were playing in the house under construction next door and I gave her kid a small tap on the behind to get him going home (he didn't think he had to listen to me). So Ive had to re-teach myself to not be a hitter. Smacking was just 'normal' and I didn't think before I did it.
I don't think I need to beat the holy hell out of Buckshot when he whacks me across the face with his face when I'm standing front of him. He will stop doing it after being flicked, but only for a minute. Do I increase the level of the thunk for each time he does it? If he keeps it up does he get a really hard smack?
Dogs are SO much easier!!
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post #42 of 56 Old 12-23-2016, 12:28 PM
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My horses live at home, and I insist on good manners. And yes, consistency is key. It doesn't matter if it's freezing cold, raining, whatever - when I'm putting their (non-hay) food in their feed pans, they are to stand an arm's reach away and wait. One foot moving toward me and they are made to back up. They don't get to reach for their food until I walk between them and the food and leave the area.

In the mornings, when they just get hay, I usually just toss it over the fence since I'm usually dressed for work. But they still have to step back from the fence and wait. I've been late or slightly wet more than once when arriving at work because I will not hurry this!

On the lead, I expect a loose rope and a decent distance and pushing, pulling or leaning are not accepted. The only time I ever allow misbehaviors is during training, when I can be pretty sure the balking, shying, or whatever is due to confusion or fear. During those instances I offer calming and supportive reassurance and we do it again, and again until they are no longer confused/afraid of the new thing.


And, @knightrider - I found Tico to be a very well behaved, well-mannered young man.
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post #43 of 56 Old 12-23-2016, 12:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynabago View Post
As a vet tech, I encounter dog owners that have no idea how to control their 'fur babies'. They think its cute that Fido is bouncing all over the place, jumping on everyone, trying to lick faces, and even marking corners, etc. Ive been bitten by a few dogs that the owner just chuckled and thought it was funny that Fido doesn't like me. At my house, I'm the alpha. I expect my 4 dogs to have manners at home and on outings. When they misbehave and they hear me screech, everyone stands at attention!!
SO, when I got my horse about a month ago, of course he has got to test the waters to find out what he can get away with. My screeching doesn't mean squat to Buckshot. A flick on the nose does. I'm struggling with the level of discipline to use with him. I grew up learning that spanking was the way to discipline. Ive gotten yelled at by the neighbor when our 5 yo boys were playing in the house under construction next door and I gave her kid a small tap on the behind to get him going home (he didn't think he had to listen to me). So Ive had to re-teach myself to not be a hitter. Smacking was just 'normal' and I didn't think before I did it.
I don't think I need to beat the holy hell out of Buckshot when he whacks me across the face with his face when I'm standing front of him. He will stop doing it after being flicked, but only for a minute. Do I increase the level of the thunk for each time he does it? If he keeps it up does he get a really hard smack?
Dogs are SO much easier!!
Yes! If they are doing something physical to me I get physical right back. For something like swinging their head into me they would get their ear boxed and then made to back off until they were ready to mind their manners (this is where knowing body language helps). Then I'll relax, stop my version of the mare glare, and turn away. They can approach me again as long as they are being respectful but if they so much as think about butting me with that head again they would be made to back off again. So to point out what I think is important in what I just said...they touch me - I touch back and hard, I catch them when they're just thinking about it - disciplined by sending them away but no corporal punishment.

R.I.P. JC 5/19/85 - 12/9/14. You made my life better.
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post #44 of 56 Old 12-23-2016, 12:56 PM
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Oh and another thing I like to connect a verbal cue every time I discipline. Some people like to use an "ack" or "no" or "stop" or my version is "knock it off". Eventually they'll learn what that word or phrase means.
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R.I.P. JC 5/19/85 - 12/9/14. You made my life better.
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post #45 of 56 Old 12-23-2016, 03:29 PM
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When I got my own horse, he had no manners. He tried to bully me on the ground. The guy I bought him from told me to always carry a crop with him...told him I would only need it two times and after that he would be fine. He thought I was joking. First day I got him he tried to bite me. I screamed at him like a banshee and slammed the whip down on his nose. After that, he kept his mouth to himself. Second day he tried to run me over and drag me. I made that little ****** work a circle at a trot for a good ten minutes. After that he never did it again. He is now the most well behaved pony on ground and in the saddle ( had no saddle training, was just a 6 hitch driving gelding. I trained him all he knows with a friend/trainers guidance) that everyone wants him. I've had people offer me money to buy him, after they saw him under saddle...Sorry he is mine for life :)

I also use a voice word of "ahhh" and he knows under saddle and on the ground, that he better stop and listen to me and or change what he is doing. I treat him like a horse would in the herd. Listen and pay attention to me, I am your alpha. Don't then you get corrected and taught that listening is easier.
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Last edited by ThreeWishGamble; 12-23-2016 at 03:32 PM. Reason: adding more
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post #46 of 56 Old 12-23-2016, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by ThreeWishGamble View Post
When I got my own horse, he had no manners. He tried to bully me on the ground. The guy I bought him from told me to always carry a crop with him...told him I would only need it two times and after that he would be fine. He thought I was joking. First day I got him he tried to bite me. I screamed at him like a banshee and slammed the whip down on his nose. After that, he kept his mouth to himself. Second day he tried to run me over and drag me. I made that little ****** work a circle at a trot for a good ten minutes. After that he never did it again. He is now the most well behaved pony on ground and in the saddle ( had no saddle training, was just a 6 hitch driving gelding. I trained him all he knows with a friend/trainers guidance) that everyone wants him. I've had people offer me money to buy him, after they saw him under saddle...Sorry he is mine for life :)

I also use a voice word of "ahhh" and he knows under saddle and on the ground, that he better stop and listen to me and or change what he is doing. I treat him like a horse would in the herd. Listen and pay attention to me, I am your alpha. Don't then you get corrected and taught that listening is easier.
EXACTLY how I am with my dogs!! It seems harder with the horse. Hes like my 2 y.o. grandson. Keeps being naughty, even after yelling, time out, hand smacked. The dogs get whose in charge! I just taught my 3y.o. Vizsla to play dead in 10 minutes. I'm not one to give up and let something I OWN get the best of me! I think my struggle with the horse is that hes an 1100# animal that sometimes DECIDES he doesn't HAVE to listen to me. I'm not looking forward to the time he DECIDES his hoof belongs on my backside!
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post #47 of 56 Old 12-23-2016, 06:01 PM
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I have a morgan/qtr gelding that is constantly testing me. What I've found works the best with him is a really, really good and solid nose bumping with the halter (rope halters here) and then backing, backing, backing. I do yelling and real crazy lady arm waving and yelling. He figures he never wants to see me act like that again! Its a procedure I can use even in very small spaces so don't need lunging room or even room to crack a whip. After a time or two you don't even need to be in halter, just the mere act of being crazy keeps him out of my space.
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post #48 of 56 Old 12-23-2016, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boots View Post
Some people almost seem proud of their horse's bad manners. Like it indicates "spirit," or some such nonsense.

I groomed a few games a couple years ago for a polo player whose horses were ill-mannered. They quickly became well behaved for me. The first day. But when the player would handle them they acted all screwy. Once as he was leading a mare while she was bouncing up on her hind legs, he said "They can always tell when I'm around!" A nearby teammate muttered "yeah, and that you're a pushover."
So true, as I have seen that. It is not so much the bad manners, but the pride they get in showing that they can ride such a horse.
How do I know that? Well, color me guilty! I was a teenager, and did not know any better
Once that stud stopped rearing and going over backwards, that I posted about before, he would still take off at full gallop, soon as my left foot was in the stirrup. One of the workers, we had , in the summer, for the tobacco fields, tried to ride him, but could not get on, for the reason mentioned\
I was 17 and that guy was kinda cute, so getting on the rest of the way, while my horse was in full gallop, was 'false pride' on my part.
What can I say, I had no mentors, and that is the way I saw some of my favorite western heros mount!
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post #49 of 56 Old 12-24-2016, 02:43 AM
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My wise old mother would say that if you want to see how a family's children would turn out, look at how obedient their dog was!

Any interaction with animals, including humans, takes time and effort setting boundaries and enforcing them.

The time and trouble taken at the outset means that later funncan be had but when the order to stop is issued it is obeyed.
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post #50 of 56 Old 12-24-2016, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by LoriF View Post
Back to the original post. Sometimes the owner cannot always be blamed for bad behavior, especially at a boarding barn where more than one person is dealing with said horses. ...
Honestly, I don't think it is always the owners doing the spoiling. The other day when I arrived at the farm, there was another boarder there and she was giving Laela treats over the fence. When I asked her not to do that, she became somewhat offended and I was not mean about it either.
My horse has good manners and is respectful to the point kids or very inexperienced people can handle her safely. However, being boarded for 6+ years at a barn with lots of kids and new-to-horses adults led to a habit that I truly can't stand- she is an insufferable "licker." People who don't know about horses seem to have an instinct to go up to a horse and put their open palm under the horse's nose- and Isabel is always ready to oblige by licking their palm, which people think is just hysterically funny. Mind you, she's not getting a treat. She's just literally licking their hand. She doesn't bite, she doesn't nibble. But she'll stand there licking as long as a person will let her do it. I think it's so irritating!

I thought when we moved to our new barn, where there are no kids and most of the adults are amateur competitors, it would stop. But no! New BO, who can handle giant warmbloods with just "that look," because of the time she's put into manners, also thinks the licking is a hoot and lets Izzy do it too. I guess I've just accepted that she's always going to do it since everyone but me seems to think it's funny.
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