Just Bought A Pasture But Is This Fence Safe?! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Jessica J Sherwood View Post
I will have to make sure we do this--I've missed this in my reading. Does this add significant stability to the whole structure? Do you have a good source that explains how exactly to do this?
That is exactly why it is done, to keep the fence from sagging and then falling down. There are many sources on the internet to show how to correctly cross-brace a fence. If you put in gates you'll have to brace them too. Gates are a PITA to get right in my experience.

I suggest you check out the Premier 1 website -- they are the best source of info and materials for electric livestock fencing. I've used them for goat, horse, and poultry fencing.

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post #12 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 02:06 PM
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There's no issue using metal T-posts for an electric fence---you just buy the plastic insulators. The one issue we had with our mule is that he was a jumper so that may be a consideration for yours.
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post #13 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 02:17 PM
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Premier is a great resource. T-posts should be available at any farm supply and some stores like Home Depot or Lowes depending on the location. My choice for charger is Pel or Parmack. This is copied form Wikipedia and explains how a charger works. A typical livestock charger shouldn't be lethal but that doesn't mean it can't be in under certain circumstances. Make sure the fence is posted and children are supervised at all times. Even then eventually if a child is around one often enough they will touch it and learn to avoid it in the future.

Wikipedia: A person or animal touching both the wire and the earth during a pulse will complete an electrical circuit and will conduct the pulse, causing an electric shock. The effects of the shock depend upon the voltage, the energy of the pulse, the degree of contact between the recipient and the fence and ground and the route of the current through the body; it can range from barely noticeable to uncomfortable, painful or even lethal.
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post #14 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 02:37 PM
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Honestly unless your children are under 2-3, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Even if they do touch it, once is usually enough to teach them not to do it again!

Plenty of us grew up in similar circumstances and survived just fine. Until we got to be teenagers and then did stupid stuff on purpose XD
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post #15 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Jessica J Sherwood View Post
Thank you! Do you have a recommendation on the charger?--one that is child safe as well in the event the child doesn't listen not to touch.
Children learn the same way as the animals do - you tell them not to touch, they either disobey or forget and touch it. They get a shock, you get a chance to say "I told you not to touch!"

Personally I always had a laugh when the children did touch it.

My niece was about six when she forgot the high tensile electrified wire when she ran into it. It got her straight across her forehead and she landed on her butt.

She never forgot again.
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post #16 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 03:54 PM
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Eventually if you are around it long enough you'll get too. Not pleasant but you don't forget it. With all the boys around we have had a few get tricked into peeing on the fence. That has to hurt in ways I can't even imagine.
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post #17 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Mulefeather View Post
Honestly unless your children are under 2-3, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Even if they do touch it, once is usually enough to teach them not to do it again!

Plenty of us grew up in similar circumstances and survived just fine. Until we got to be teenagers and then did stupid stuff on purpose XD
Oh no, are we going to start another How We Entertained Ourselves On The Farm thread? Hot wires figure largely in those discussions . . .

The reason hot wire works so very well is that mammals have a kind of primal aversion to being stung. Set correctly most will just make you JUMP and that's it, but it's enough.

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post #18 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 05:41 PM
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If the mules haven't been around an electric fence then you might have a problem...

Electric fences are physiological barriers, not physical barriers....and when Mr. Jack came home as a colt, he ran straight through ours.....and never realized what was hitting him....

With a new fence, as you described, I see no issues....I've got a hot wire about 12 inches off the ground and another one just over the top of my woven wire fence.....So the horses can't lean on it.....and the kids will only climb on it once.

News travels fast, and after the first couple of kids touched it, the word was out.....
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For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.
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post #19 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
Eventually if you are around it long enough you'll get too. Not pleasant but you don't forget it. With all the boys around we have had a few get tricked into peeing on the fence. That has to hurt in ways I can't even imagine.
Lol, there was a video circulating about a year ago of 2 drunk young ladies peeing on hot wire.....priceless!!! There's no end to stupidity
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Last edited by HombresArablegacy; 05-31-2016 at 09:11 PM. Reason: Spelling
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post #20 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by HombresArablegacy View Post
If you're going to use no climb horse fencing, don't leave a 6 inch gap at the bottom. That's an open invitation for them to get their feet/legs hung up in it. It should reach all the way to the ground. Also, the fencing should be run on the inside of the fence line, not the outside of the posts to keep them from pushing on/through it.
One strand of hot wire running along the inside of the fence above the wire fence will do the trick, putting boards on top is an added expense and labor intensive.
Just replace the iffy posts, make sure the corners are cross braced and cemented in and you will be good to go.
"I had planned on putting the horse fencing 6" from the ground" Pretty sure that is a typo for 6' (feet) not inches. Wouldn't make sense otherwise!

If you re read the OPs that is exactly what the plan is! The OP was just wondering if there was a way around replacing posts and my answer was to just not build the fence so high lol.

I dislike electric wire, though I do like different types of electric (the safe ones, lol)
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