Just Bought A Pasture But Is This Fence Safe?! - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 30 Old 05-31-2016, 08:36 PM
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I don't even want to imagine that Hombre.
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post #22 of 30 Old 06-01-2016, 12:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HombresArablegacy View Post
Lol, there was a video circulating about a year ago of 2 drunk young ladies peeing on hot wire.....priceless!!! There's no end to stupidity
This is why you have to keep drunks away from large animals, electricity, cars, and open water :)
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post #23 of 30 Old 06-01-2016, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Mulefeather View Post
This is why you have to keep drunks away from large animals, electricity, cars, and open water :)

And gators and crocs too!
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post #24 of 30 Old 06-01-2016, 05:31 PM
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I've dealt with hotwire in some very creative ways over the years. So here's another idea.
I'm assuming your existing posts are wood.

I would put the no-climb clear down to the ground. It will keep your dogs in and everybody else's out. Unless they dig. (Whole 'nother topic.) Then I would buy a whole bunch of the nail-on foot long plastic insulators. Put one strand of electric at the top of the no-climb. Then, I would nail insulators sticking straight up on top of the posts and run another strand up there. That will increase the height of your fence by 12" with a hotwire. It is also possible to nail them at an angle so they stick out AND up. You could use the clip on insulators directly on the no-climb if you prefer the clip on kind. Then if needed, you can add another strand down lower.

Good luck! And congrats on getting your own place!
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post #25 of 30 Old 06-02-2016, 11:11 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Prairie View Post
There's no issue using metal T-posts for an electric fence---you just buy the plastic insulators. The one issue we had with our mule is that he was a jumper so that may be a consideration for yours.
Thank you! Fantastic!
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post #26 of 30 Old 06-02-2016, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
"I had planned on putting the horse fencing 6" from the ground" Pretty sure that is a typo for 6' (feet) not inches. Wouldn't make sense otherwise!
Actually I did mean 6". They tell you to start the wire mesh 1-6" off the ground and most websites recommended to start 6". :o
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post #27 of 30 Old 06-02-2016, 11:17 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Partita View Post
I've dealt with hotwire in some very creative ways over the years. So here's another idea.
I'm assuming your existing posts are wood.

I would put the no-climb clear down to the ground. It will keep your dogs in and everybody else's out. Unless they dig. (Whole 'nother topic.) Then I would buy a whole bunch of the nail-on foot long plastic insulators. Put one strand of electric at the top of the no-climb. Then, I would nail insulators sticking straight up on top of the posts and run another strand up there. That will increase the height of your fence by 12" with a hotwire. It is also possible to nail them at an angle so they stick out AND up. You could use the clip on insulators directly on the no-climb if you prefer the clip on kind. Then if needed, you can add another strand down lower.

Good luck! And congrats on getting your own place!
Why thank you! This is another great idea! I will run this all by my husband and I'm super exited to get this fence finished and safe and get these animals home to pasture! Thank you!
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post #28 of 30 Old 06-02-2016, 11:32 AM
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I'm not too crazy about horses and T-posts though I do realize what happened to us was a freak accident.

We have a horse that when he 1st came to us was a bit klutzy. He somehow managed to skewer himself on a t-post. Thankfully, he did the perfect job of it and came off the post straight so he didn't rip his chest open.
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post #29 of 30 Old 06-02-2016, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessica J Sherwood View Post
Actually I did mean 6". They tell you to start the wire mesh 1-6" off the ground and most websites recommended to start 6". :o
Oh ok than disregard my entire previous post lol. How tall do you mean to make it?

I would also run it to the ground, I don't understand why you wouldn't.

I personally don't want metal anywhere near my horses, I've seen what it does.
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post #30 of 30 Old 06-03-2016, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
Oh ok than disregard my entire previous post lol. How tall do you mean to make it?

I would also run it to the ground, I don't understand why you wouldn't.

I personally don't want metal anywhere near my horses, I've seen what it does.
I agree.... would want the wire touching the ground or not at all. Off the ground a horse will get a leg or hoof stuck under it cause that what horses do.
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