Katie passed her vetting!Help with deciding livery? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 54 Old 01-20-2018, 11:37 AM
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Lovely girl! Congrats on your new horse. May you have many a happy year with her!
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post #22 of 54 Old 01-20-2018, 01:21 PM
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Congrats on your new baby! She looks lovely in these new photos. :)
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post #23 of 54 Old 01-21-2018, 09:10 AM
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She is just adorable! And it sounds like she has a lovely temperament. I do see a very kind look in her eye, but also an intelligent face - mixed in with the draft in her, you'll have to watch that she doesn't get into too much mischief! Continue to reinforce ground manners every time you handle her - that is one of my pet peeves with lesson horses. They can quickly learn that they can get away with stuff and acquire bad habits from other riders. That said, I think your approach is just perfect. Get to know her a little, let her settle in, then maybe try to let a few advanced riders get on her under the supervision of someone you trust. Good riders will make her a better horse. Bad riders, well...

Enjoy the journey! This first year with her will be so exciting! Your life is about to change completely, and in the best possible way. Cheers!
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post #24 of 54 Old 01-23-2018, 03:57 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks so much @Acadianartist . I will be sure to not let her run over me ;) I spoke directly to the instructor today and she said they literally only do a few hours a week and don't accept novice riders in the first place. I'm very much looking forward to my next ride on Katie... once I get some tack hah!

But I am having another slight dilemma now regarding FEED. The seller says that Katie is on whatever grass is available outside and ad-lib haylage because quality hay is a problem and she's tried two different suppliers and waiting on a 3rd. She's on no hard feed but that isn't to say she wasn't before when she was in Ireland. I will be waiting to see what the new yard offers on Friday but if anyone has any starter recommendations I'd be super gra♠teful. I will be looking more to balancing her diet and keeping that gut active as it should be but just need a place to start off!

Thanks a bunch :)
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post #25 of 54 Old 01-23-2018, 04:13 PM
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To start, as much turn out time with access to grass and hay or haylage as possible...well not as much as possible, but access to long stem feed at all times. I would not put her on a concentrate at this point, just monitor her, if she loses condition or 'sparkle' then add something. The biggest issue in horse feeding is adding more than is needed.
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post #26 of 54 Old 01-23-2018, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
THIS. I've had my two horses for over two years now, and the best thing I ever did was get to know them on the ground. My fondest memories so far are of those moments. Spend as much time as you can (I know it's limited, which is why I say as much as you can) just hanging out with her. Try to be there well before lessons so you can not only groom her, but also perhaps hand walk her, graze her if that's an option, work on a few ground manners, maybe even look into things like clicker training or liberty training. You'd be surprised how much of a bond you can create even by just being near her, reading a book or whatever. Notice that bonded horses don't interact all that much, they just stay near each other in a field. Do that.
.
First, congrats on being a new horse owner! I am somewhat of a newbie myself, just adopted Duke over the summer, and Loretta in the fall. Purchasing everything you will need can be a bit overwhelming and can get expensive. And as soon as you think you have every piece of tack ever created, you realize you are missing something... I now think I own more horse gear, than human gear.

I second what @Acadianartist said above. Neither of my horses have been ridden yet so we lack that ridder/horse bond. When I adopted Duke I spent hours with him each day, just in his presence. I would muck stalls, fill water, rake the gravel portion of the pasture or just sit in the pasture waiting for him to show interest. It took months, but we developed a very close bond. I am welcomed each day with a winnie, and I part with a set of deep huffs and hoof stomping. So far I have worked with him on clicker training, being respectful of boundaries, and even taught him a few tricks. I know this doesn't seem like a lot, but this is a lot for a 20s something horse that was saved from slaughter because he was lame.
Those few months of bonding time were lacking with Loretta due to the changing weather. We don't have the same close bond as Duke and me, but it is something I plan on working on as soon as Maine defrosts.

Sounds like you have an amazing horse and I hope that you two can form as wonderful a bond as Duke and I.
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post #27 of 54 Old 01-23-2018, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Kalraii View Post
Thanks so much @Acadianartist . I will be sure to not let her run over me ;) I spoke directly to the instructor today and she said they literally only do a few hours a week and don't accept novice riders in the first place. I'm very much looking forward to my next ride on Katie... once I get some tack hah!

But I am having another slight dilemma now regarding FEED. The seller says that Katie is on whatever grass is available outside and ad-lib haylage because quality hay is a problem and she's tried two different suppliers and waiting on a 3rd. She's on no hard feed but that isn't to say she wasn't before when she was in Ireland. I will be waiting to see what the new yard offers on Friday but if anyone has any starter recommendations I'd be super gra♠teful. I will be looking more to balancing her diet and keeping that gut active as it should be but just need a place to start off!

Thanks a bunch :)
Agree with @Gold en, most often, folks overdo it with grain or pellets when it isn't really necessary. I'm a big fan of keeping the diet as simple and "natural" as possible (quotation marks are because no diet provided by humans is really natural). For us, soaked hay cubes (timothy or timothy-alfalfa) work great. Fed twice a day, they provide a vehicle for supplements and because you're essentially just feeding them hay, it won't cause stomach upset. They don't need a lot! I feed mine 100g dry twice a day (yes, I weigh it, and it does really expand when wet). In the winter, more like 250g per feeding for each horse. I add salt, a farrier's mix of cobalt, zinc, copper and magnesium, biotin, flax and selenium+vitamin E because our soil is selenium deficient. Then I add spirulina for immune health (not necessary, but I think it has helped mine) and a pre/probiotic mix for my gelding with ulcers.

However, before you start feeding a bunch of supplements, you need to make sure you know what your horse needs. Ideally, you get your hay analyzed for content so you know what to add, and what NOT to add (which can be just as important). For example, we have a lot of iron in our soil, therefore in our hay. Too much iron can cause a lot of problems so the last thing I want to do is feed something that contains more iron. On the other hand we have no selenium so I need to add it in. The reverse might be true where you live. If you aren't sure yet what hay you will be using, you can still get a pretty good idea of the mixtures in your area by talking to someone who is knowledgeable. An equine nutritionist (try to find one that doesn't work for a horse feed company though) or a good farrier/trimmer can help.

The best thing to do is to keep the horse's diet the same at first, and introduce anything new slowly. If you don't know what the horse was eating, best to stick to hay or haylage, but you can't go wrong by adding a few hay cubes as long as they're just compressed hay. Sprinkling some salt on the hay cubes is a good idea too, and won't hurt. That will allow the horse to get used to the hay cubes before you start adding supplements. If your BO won't soak the hay cubes (some think this is a hassle), you might consider hay pellets fed dry, but it's not ideal. There are ration balancers that give you decent overall benefits, though I prefer the more analytic customized approach.
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post #28 of 54 Old 01-23-2018, 05:51 PM
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What extra you feed depends on the quality of hay or haylage her new yard provides. Haylage on the whole retains more nutrients than hay so you tend to need less extra feed. Turnout in the UK winter is always uncertain and a lot of yards restrict it in wet, muddy weather to preserve their land. Hunters were traditionally fed oats or barley, chaff and bran but with all the new complete feeds things have changed. the uk has plenty of low sugar/low starch complete feeds to offer, plus sugar beet and plain chaff. You can get grass nuts (pellets) but Iíve never seen the sort of grass cubes over there that have to be soaked, they arenít something Iíd ever buy myself as itís easier to feed a good quality chaff (chopped forage) and damp it slightly, they give the horse more to chew which produces more saliva which in turn helps reduce stomach acid levels
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post #29 of 54 Old 01-23-2018, 07:12 PM
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What extra you feed depends on the quality of hay or haylage her new yard provides. Haylage on the whole retains more nutrients than hay so you tend to need less extra feed. Turnout in the UK winter is always uncertain and a lot of yards restrict it in wet, muddy weather to preserve their land. Hunters were traditionally fed oats or barley, chaff and bran but with all the new complete feeds things have changed. the uk has plenty of low sugar/low starch complete feeds to offer, plus sugar beet and plain chaff. You can get grass nuts (pellets) but Iíve never seen the sort of grass cubes over there that have to be soaked, they arenít something Iíd ever buy myself as itís easier to feed a good quality chaff (chopped forage) and damp it slightly, they give the horse more to chew which produces more saliva which in turn helps reduce stomach acid levels
Thanks for pointing out that hay cubes a thing in the UK @jaydee . I guess I was thinking that the OP might be thinking of vitamins and minerals, and hay cubes seem like the most innocuous vehicle for those. I don't know how you would feed things like biotin and flax without having some sort of wet feed.
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post #30 of 54 Old 01-23-2018, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Truthfully, I would rather put her on stall board with no turnout
Well that one's an absolute 'NO! Just NO!!!' from me - I too would be very... cautious at least, of doing the 'working livery' thing with my horse, but I'd absolutely choose that(possibly not great) option over full stall board, ESPECIALLY if there was not turnout(definitely terrible), if that were the only choice. Recipe for a miserable, unhealthy horse! I just wouldn't consider keeping a horse in a box, without a LOT of turnout.
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