Keeping a Mare and Stallion together - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 02:48 AM
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Originally Posted by FreeInTheWind View Post
my mother is the one funding it. She is allowing me to get a horse and she wants sheep and cattle. I have well done my research and i know alot more than i show. I know about medical expenses (like teeth floating, and things like cuts and scrapes etc) what hay and nutrition , what i want to do with the horse and what discipline, how to fit a saddle. And we will have our own pasture a stable to keep them in. I only want to trail ride so i don't need long lessons. Trust me i have been doing my research watching tons of videos on how to care for a horse (like how to pick a horses feet, how to bathe them) and we are trying to find someone so i can get used to at least riding one. of course will learn things along the way (i will have a trainer to help me along the way) and i do know how much horses cost in the long run that's why i will be getting a job. (we will be moving this summer btw)
I hope your mother can afford a good trainer. I also hope she has a really good job.
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post #22 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 03:06 AM
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So how much hands on experience do you have to back up all this research? How long have you been riding, what sort of lessons? Who is going to help you with this horse

“Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity”
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post #23 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 04:39 AM
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OP are you having the horses at home or on a yard?

If you're starting out, it might be worth looking at keeping the older horse with experience on a yard where you will have people surrounding you who know what they're doing- from the yard owner, trainers and other owners. That way you can learn from them and gain a good background in dealing with horses rather than just a theory behind owning a horse.

As for the youngsters, it is entirely your choice but I once had three horses whilst in full time education then came down to one (there were various reasons as to how I ended up with three, I didn't go and buy them all). It was a very hectic time and I found myself spending more time mucking out, poo picking and filling hay nets than I did enjoying them.

There are also other options- go get some riding lessons in and see if you can loan a horse for 6/8/12 months before buying one. Even trail riding you'll still need a good few lessons to get the best from you and the horse.

A handful of lessons and watching youtube won't help you when the horse acts up (which definitely happens, especially if they "get your number" and has happened to every horse owner and rider in this forum at some point, no matter how naturally horseman ship has come to them), how to deal in a real emergency (I worked on a yard and turned up for my shift to discover a pony club horse with her hind legs stuck through a fence and couldn't get hold of the vet to sedate her so the fire brigade could cut her loose), or even every day things that now after years of experience come second nature to us but may be over looked.

I learnt some very valuable life lessons by being around others more experienced than me. Horse ownership is exciting and amazing, but it isn't all fantastic at times. Don't jump in feet first, take a deep breath and think of the long term rather than the exciting now and how you can help yourself and your future horses :)
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post #24 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 05:25 AM
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Windy, some experienced people here are trying to help you by preventing you making a huge mistake. I doubt you will listen so I just hope your mom has some sense.

Over here the minimum to break a horse in would be $700, and actually that cost is out of date. Then the horse needs regular riding, and schooling. By the time it is a suitable horse for a novice, you are AT LEAST two years down the track, with regular riding. If you plan on having it green broke and turn it out till you are ready for it, the horse's life is wasted.

Then you need to consider time. You are at school now and have all the time in the world. When you go to college your homework load increases and recreation time is much less. Will you still have 3 to 4 hours a day for those horses.

Better you have one horse that can teach you everything you need to know, and enjoy all your time with. Then when you get those days where 'you don't have time' or 'can't be bothered' you can get away with just a half hour to feed and check on it.

If you liken the knowledge need to train a horse to a 1000 page book...you are on page one. I hope you understand what we are trying to tell you.

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post #25 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 05:28 AM
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Originally Posted by FreeInTheWind View Post
i actually do know "the birds and the bees" i know you cant keep them together but i was just asking how long i can keep them together until the colt is gelded. Thats why i am asking questions so i know what i am doing before i get any horses. Everyone starts some where
If they have been running together then chances are that the mare is already in foal.
Also they need to be apart for several weeks after the Colt is gelded.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeInTheWind View Post
my mother is the one funding it. She is allowing me to get a horse and she wants sheep and cattle. I have well done my research and i know alot more than i show. I know about medical expenses (like teeth floating, and things like cuts and scrapes etc) what hay and nutrition , what i want to do with the horse and what discipline, how to fit a saddle. And we will have our own pasture a stable to keep them in. I only want to trail ride so i don't need long lessons. Trust me i have been doing my research watching tons of videos on how to care for a horse (like how to pick a horses feet, how to bathe them) and we are trying to find someone so i can get used to at least riding one. of course will learn things along the way (i will have a trainer to help me along the way) and i do know how much horses cost in the long run that's why i will be getting a job. (we will be moving this summer btw)
this on its own says that you are not experienced enough to deal with young horses.
You can watch all the videos, read all the books, talk the talk but unless you have hands on experience it is a very different ball game - horses have the potential of being lethal certainly 99% of them will take advantage of novice people without an experienced person to help.
After all, they have never read the books or watched the videos.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeInTheWind View Post
wishful thinking. Just gettin ready for anything. I already know the basics like grooming, leading, feeding. Just getting a more tips. Ill be getting a horse round late this year so i have lots of time
Keep it as wishful thinking and take hours and hours of lessons and as many hours again learning how to handle them.

As a child my wishful thinking was to own a stallion and to be galloping him all over the place with the wind blowing through his mane and my hair.
Fortunately my parents sent me for lessons and by the time I was in my early teens all thoughts of owning a stallion had disappeared.
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post #26 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 06:35 AM
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As someone very slowly learning some ground work with horses as well as practical applications in a good few other areas I can backup that theory is never enough to learn.

The thing you have to realise is that theory is only ever talking about idealistic situations or very specific individuals or horses and patterns of behaviour. In reality things get far more complex because you'll get situations that are not specifically covered in written theory; you'll get horses that don't do what the theory book says they "should" do; you'll get into situations where two or three blocks of theory clash; you'll get situations where there is no "safe" approach etc...


Life throws a lot of things that you won't expect or are not formally covered.
Furthermore there's linking up of theories; one or two theories on their own are easy to understand and do - however sometimes practical applications mean that you've got to do two or three things at once or realise and appreciate those things and that takes time, practice and proper handling and interaction.


Another factor is bad habits; on your own its very very very easy to develop them; especially if they work. Because a lot of the time there are rules or methods that make things last longer, or more complex because they are there to protect against the rare instances when thing go wrong. If you don't get someone watching and helping you avoid those mistakes and habits you'll not only put yourself at risk but also give yourself a series of methods that you will one day have to "unlearn" which is tricky to do.


A final thought is limit points; points where an activity or method is failing and you have to pause and stop; or change to a new method. You might read about those things, but often the signs that tell you to change or stop are going to be ones that you have to learn to read. Doing that yourself it will generally mean you have to go beyond those limit points to find out where they are; with a tutor they can show you the signs; show you the build up and show you when to stop before you reach that point. They can also give you alternative methods or concepts to use at the time.


Theory is easier and cheaper to learn for sure and researching theory is good; but too much will only leave you confused and without practical application you won't have properly learned it. That's both learning at the theory level and also learning at the practical level. Eg putting on a halter or bridle is easy - but even on dummy horse that isn't moving its head at all you'll find it fiddly and time consuming to get it done right.
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post #27 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 07:29 AM
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OP, back to your original question. Smart people geld a colt between 3-6 months old and don't wait years. This causes the horse to not develop the dangerous behaviors the stallion hormones cause and make him ready to be more easily trained. 99% of colts are not breeding quality and should be gelded. The world has too many horses already.

I know this colt is hypothetical but from the age of about 1-1/2, a colt should never be turned out with a mare or filly. He is driven by his hormones and pregnancy is inevitable. Bad behavior soon follows as they only have one primary aim and that's reproduction.

You don't sound ready to own a horse yet (sorry) let alone several. Find a local stable, take lessons (very arrogant of you to think you don't need them) and learn what this huge responsibility is all about. If you don't, the horses are the ones who will suffer.
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post #28 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 07:57 AM
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Not a good idea at all
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post #29 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 08:03 AM
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Just a thought; but horses are simple. So is chainsawing, driving a car, flying a plane and open heart surgery.

Or at least the component skills and methods that make up the overall are often simple. Most tasks can be boiled down into a series of simple steps that can be put into words and thus form the theory. Thus reading written material, watching videos etc.. can present the idea that you can learn a lot very quickly.

And you can.

But what you've not got is practical application of the theory. You've not had the practice to have the muscle memory to perform certain actions; or to know how hard/soft to apply force or pressure. You've not had the practice to have the dexterity in your hands and body to perform common actions quickly; nor to perform two or three at the same time; nor to combine them on the fly as the situation evolves its own unique attributes.



It's a trap many can fall into in thinking that they know more than they practically can and overconfidence leads to mistakes; and its worth is you've got overconfidence with actual inexperience.
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post #30 of 48 Old 03-22-2016, 12:55 PM Thread Starter
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you guys have really opened my eyes. i will start with a older horse (oh and i do know the dangers of owning a horse and the pros and cons) and then get the foal years down the road when i know what im doing. But he also wont be alone either im gonna rescue 2 companion horses (yes i know you have to care for them exactly like a ridden horse you just cant ride them) we will have a pasture and stuff and im happy all of you are here to help me
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