Learning to stand up for yourself as a beginner - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 02:53 AM Thread Starter
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Learning to stand up for yourself as a beginner

After a few years of being tossed off regularly and a lot od very traumatic situations, I finally found my spine - not in the least due to this forum.

So, my current position is that I will stop all riding if I feel that the situation is unsafe, regardless of what my instructor thinks. Before I signed up with her I told her that. She made some noises about me disrupting the group lessons but I shut that down by saying that I am sure she was a professional who would never put her students in danger so it will not be a problem.

Anyhow, one such occasion presented itself a few days ago. We had a group lesson and she paired a very inexperienced rider with a very large, very witchy mare which we all know to be very difficult. I walked into the arena, saw the situation and walked right out without saying anything. I could see she was very angry with me but I refuse to be pushed into dangerous situations any more.

Well, not five minutes later the mare loses it, the inexperienced rider cannot control her and they go on a rampage. She kicked every single horse in the arena. At least twice. Yup.

After the ďlessonĒ ended, my instructor was visibly teed off with me, but really couldnít say anything because I was right.

Disclaimer: I am not planning a career in the horse world. I am not planning on competing. I donít need to know how to handle a dangerous horse or a warm up arena. Iím just riding for pleasure. People who want to go higher need to be able to handle a situation like this but I really donít think beginners and novices should be exposed to this.
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post #2 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 05:15 AM
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Well done you.
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post #3 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 07:19 AM
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That was a very good call on your part. And if my horse had 1) gotten kicked and run over by the rampaging horse or 2) I had been put on the rampaging horse, that instructor would have seen what it's like to deal with a rampaging owner. Actually, I'd probably be looking for a new barn with a more professional instructor to teach me. If I were in your shoes, I'd have taken the fight straight to her when she acted pissy after the fact. And then I'd have unloaded right on her head. Granted "stuff happens" and even the most bomb proof horse can have a moment or 3 when something causes them to just lose it, but it isn't something that everyone in the arena should be able to call 30 mins before it happens. Don't let her try to make you feel like you were in the wrong, it so was not you in this case.
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post #4 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 08:49 AM
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Wow, listened to that "little voice" and got vindicated in spades, eh? Well done!
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post #5 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 09:26 AM
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Good for you.
You read the situation expertly and did what was right for you and for your horse...
Never not listen to that gut instinct.. gut instinct keeps you safe and alive more times correctly than not!!


If this is occurring to often...a lack in judgement, then I would be taking my business elsewhere where my safety is not compromised nor that of my horse. PERIOD!
Sounds like you have had past experiences with said instructor to question her......

...
jmo...

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #6 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 10:42 AM
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When you can read a horse or situation well enough to see bad outcomes BEFORE they fully develop, you are no longer a "beginner" in my book!

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #7 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 12:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsef View Post
After a few years of being tossed off regularly and a lot od very traumatic situations, I finally found my spine - not in the least due to this forum.

So, my current position is that I will stop all riding if I feel that the situation is unsafe, regardless of what my instructor thinks. Before I signed up with her I told her that. She made some noises about me disrupting the group lessons but I shut that down by saying that I am sure she was a professional who would never put her students in danger so it will not be a problem.

I would LIKE this a hundred times!! You fixed your spine without even paying a chiropractor

Safety for you and the horse first!

LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE
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post #8 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by bsms View Post
When you can read a horse or situation well enough to see bad outcomes BEFORE they fully develop, you are no longer a "beginner" in my book!


@bsms said it perfectly!
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post #9 of 12 Old 07-15-2018, 01:40 PM
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What a boss. I love stuff like this and I wish more people, including me, listened to their gut!
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post #10 of 12 Old 07-17-2018, 07:58 AM
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Actually knowing how to handle yourself in any situation where a horse goes rogue is a good thing. If you felt it was unsafe for you, good that you removed yourself but eventually a situation will come up where you don't expect whatever happens. I am not saying this was the situation to learn in but avoidance at all cost means you never learn to be proactive and if possible learn to avoid or dissuade the situation. The trainer may not have willingly put that student on that horse. Perhaps that was the only horse left, perhaps that student insisted, perhaps the instructor felt the student should have been capable.



You do what is right for you is the bottom line but not every situation is cut and dried.
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