lease / Anglo arab / basic groundwork - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 12-10-2015, 10:41 PM Thread Starter
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lease / Anglo arab / basic groundwork

Hello all, I am not completely new to horses, just getting back into them after a 25 year hiatus. At the age of 43, I decided it was time to start riding again. I was just going to start taking lessons which turned into a partial lease on one of the schooling horses. She had to go back "home" as she really belonged to the stable owner's family out of state.
Soon after a partial lease opportunity with one of the horses boarded at the stables came available. It's a great match so far. He's a lovely Anglo Arab 15 year old gelding. Until I met him I didn't have any idea that Anglo Arab was a breed at all. But now I'm thinking this is the perfect combination of breeds. I'm hooked. I've read a lot about the breed, but still feel like I need to know more since I have no experience with either Arabs or thoroughbreds.

So, questions:
+ can anyone offer information or advice on the breed? Temperament, health issues, things to look for, etc...
+ what's the best ground work exercises for he and I to get to know each other better
+ if you are an owner who has your horse partial leased to someone, what do you expect or want from that person? How much communication? At first I felt like I was giving her more updates than I needed to, but she contacted me this weekend just to see how last week's ride went so she may want regular updates.

Any and all advice is greatly appreciated.

Thank you!
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post #2 of 6 Old 12-12-2015, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Kriva View Post
+ can anyone offer information or advice on the breed? Temperament, health issues, things to look for, etc...
As you've no doubt learned, 'anglos' are arab x TB. They are bred for their athleticism, often used in endurance. They can be rather 'hot' horses, can be more 'sensitive' and 'flighty than some(like WB's or standies for eg). Arabs also have a reputation of being 'smarter than the average bear', which is why some people feel they're harder to train(one must be smarter than the animal in question to train it well!) To my knowledge, there aren't any specific health probs of those breeds, but they're both 'hot blood' breeds that tend to have thinner skin/coats than some. Arabs tend to have genetically better hoof form/strength than many breeds, while TB's are known for having 'weak feet', but I believe this is generally nothing to do with genetics & everything to do with management/feeding.

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+ what's the best ground work exercises for he and I to get to know each other better
If you're unsure of training, get a trainer/instructor to come advise/teach, as instructions via a forum aren't quite adequate for that. But basic guidelines... think about what 'manners' you want, for safety or otherwise, and be consistent & effective at insisting on those 'manners'. I'd include yielding to pressure in any way as 'ground manners'.

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+ if you are an owner who has your horse partial leased to someone, what do you expect or want from that person? How much communication?
I have leased horses from/to others, but not on a 'partial' lease - I assume this means you're effectively sharing the horse & costs. Either way, it depends entirely on the people in question, so I'd work this out with the owner, what you both expect/hope/need from the arrangement, and have it down in writing too, to save any major misunderstandings down the track.
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post #3 of 6 Old 12-12-2015, 09:28 PM
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My feeling is that it takes you a year to really get to know your horse, while it takes him an hour or so to get to know you. everything he really needs to know about you is evident in how you approach him, how you lead him, how you walk/move around him when tacking up, how you move him somewhere, etc.

so, as to asking about exersizes on how to get to know him better, I'd just start by being the person that you want to be for him. I mean, being confident, clear and consistent. he will figure you out in a day at most, and you'll start learning about him, (but it'll take you a lot longer.)
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post #4 of 6 Old 12-14-2015, 12:42 PM
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Hi There,
I can't tell you much about Anglo Arabs but I do half lease my horse out so can answer that part of your post. I know personally that I really appreciate my leasee checking in and letting me know how things are going...it would be hard to communicate too much!

In terms of expectations, I expect you to ride on the days you say you will. I expect you to properly care for my horse meaning that you groom him before rides, don't over-ride him, and after your ride that you properly cool him out, groom or hose as needed, and put him up cool and well-groomed. If you see any type of injury or have any concerns (think he may be lame, noticing odd behaviors, are running into behavioral problems on the ground or under saddle) I expect these to be communicated ASAP so that we can come up with a plan. I can't stress this enough. I can't tell you how often I've seen leasee's (thankfully this has only happened once with me!) just deal with a problem behavior only to find out if they had communicated with their owners that the owner would have had a simple fix OR could have told you that something was seriously wrong with the horse. If you are wanting to try something new (be that something new under saddle, new tack, new potion, etc) I expect the leasee to ask me first (Even if your trainer thinks it's a good idea!) before trying anything. At the end of the day, most owners know their horse better than you so look to them as a resource and a partner as you build your own relationship with the horse.

In terms of communication and what we as owners hope for, when you are first starting a lease as an owner, our biggest question is, are they dependable & are they taking proper care of my horse? In other words, are they actually riding when they are supposed to be and are they not riding my horse too hard and properly grooming them, cooling them out, etc. Thus, I really appreciate a quick text just saying that you rode and maybe a quick something like what you worked on and/or that you gave him a nice grooming afterwards or whatever. As time goes by and you've established that you are reliable and taking good care of the horse I don't neccesarily expect a text every ride (but wouldn't mind) but occassional check ins are good.

The one thing that does upset me as an owner is when my leasee's don't ride and then tell me after the fact. If you have said you were going to ride or assigned a particular day to ride, it means that I am depending on you to care of my horse on that day. So if you can't ride that is perfectly fine (we all have those days!) but you need to tell me ahead of time (or at the worst on that day) so that if I or someone else needs to get out to ride and/or care for him that there is time to do that.

I think it sometimes helps a leasee to see the lease from the owner's perspective. For many leasees you are excited to get to know one special horse and have the opportunity to ride more. From an owners perspective, our horse is our baby but we've realized that we either need help financially and/or that we can't get out and ride as much as our horse needs. As an owner when I am looking for a new leasee I am nervous and anxious about finding the right match and takes a lot of feeling out, especially in the first few weeks. I look at my leasee as a partner and someone that I really lean on and depend on to help care for my horse. That means a lot of communicating as well as mutual love and respect for the horse.

Last thing I'll say is if you are unsure what your horse's owner's expectations are, consider just talking to them. It is hugely important that you and the owner actually talk and share your expectations with each other so that you can have a happy and healthy partnership that at the end of the day maximizes benefits to the horse and makes the lease enjoyable for your all. I know I make a point to sit down and have a conversation about these things before the lease even begins. Communication is really key!
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post #5 of 6 Old 12-15-2015, 02:05 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
My feeling is that it takes you a year to really get to know your horse, while it takes him an hour or so to get to know you. everything he really needs to know about you is evident in how you approach him, how you lead him, how you walk/move around him when tacking up, how you move him somewhere, etc.

so, as to asking about exersizes on how to get to know him better, I'd just start by being the person that you want to be for him. I mean, being confident, clear and consistent. he will figure you out in a day at most, and you'll start learning about him, (but it'll take you a lot longer.)

Great information. Thank you!! I never really thought about it that way. Animals can tell a lot about a person very quickly.
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post #6 of 6 Old 12-15-2015, 02:25 PM Thread Starter
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In terms of expectations, I expect you to ride on the days you say you will. I expect you to properly care for my horse meaning that you groom him before rides, don't over-ride him, and after your ride that you properly cool him out, groom or hose as needed, and put him up cool and well-groomed. If you see any type of injury or have any concerns (think he may be lame, noticing odd behaviors, are running into behavioral problems on the ground or under saddle) I expect these to be communicated ASAP so that we can come up with a plan. I can't stress this enough. I can't tell you how often I've seen leasee's (thankfully this has only happened once with me!) just deal with a problem behavior only to find out if they had communicated with their owners that the owner would have had a simple fix OR could have told you that something was seriously wrong with the horse. If you are wanting to try something new (be that something new under saddle, new tack, new potion, etc) I expect the leasee to ask me first (Even if your trainer thinks it's a good idea!) before trying anything. At the end of the day, most owners know their horse better than you so look to them as a resource and a partner as you build your own relationship with the horse.
You bring up some very good points. In my lease I have the option to ride three days per week. Those days are set at the beginning of the lease. The owner and I discussed the specific days ahead of time since she does try to ride one or two days per week. She and I are both in the same situation where we work full time and can only go out in the evenings after work so we did discuss the fact that other than one day per week (I have a trainer that works with me and the horse that day) that I am open to change and if I want to go out on one of "her days" then I would just check with her. This is the first time she's leased out her horse so I don't know if she really knew what to expect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by huntergirl84 View Post
In terms of communication and what we as owners hope for, when you are first starting a lease as an owner, our biggest question is, are they dependable & are they taking proper care of my horse? In other words, are they actually riding when they are supposed to be and are they not riding my horse too hard and properly grooming them, cooling them out, etc.
My trainer (who is also the barn owner) is the one that introduced the horse's owner and I. Even though I only take lessons one day per week, the trainer is usually around on the other days that I ride. She is always willing to help/answer questions. Since she also has a good relationship with the horse's owner, I think this makes the horse owner feel a little more comfortable.


Quote:
Originally Posted by huntergirl84 View Post
I think it sometimes helps a leasee to see the lease from the owner's perspective. For many leasees you are excited to get to know one special horse and have the opportunity to ride more. From an owners perspective, our horse is our baby but we've realized that we either need help financially and/or that we can't get out and ride as much as our horse needs. As an owner when I am looking for a new leasee I am nervous and anxious about finding the right match and takes a lot of feeling out, especially in the first few weeks. I look at my leasee as a partner and someone that I really lean on and depend on to help care for my horse. That means a lot of communicating as well as mutual love and respect for the horse.
I had thought about this at the beginning. I specifically told the owner that I respected the fact that this was her horse and that I would never do anything that would jeopardize the horse's health or training that he already has. I can't imagine having other people ride a horse that I owned, so I am treating her horse exactly as I would want someone to treat mine if the situation was reversed.


Quote:
Originally Posted by huntergirl84 View Post
Last thing I'll say is if you are unsure what your horse's owner's expectations are, consider just talking to them. It is hugely important that you and the owner actually talk and share your expectations with each other so that you can have a happy and healthy partnership that at the end of the day maximizes benefits to the horse and makes the lease enjoyable for your all. I know I make a point to sit down and have a conversation about these things before the lease even begins. Communication is really key!
I've really tried to keep the lines of communication open without prying. I know that there was some reason that she hasn't been able to ride much the last few years and now can only ride/see him one or two days per week. That's the reason she got into the lease with me. She really just wants him to be exercised and shown some love more often than she can do herself. Neither of us are showing or doing any type of competition. I think that helps with keeping things really low key and happier.

I really appreciate you taking time to share this information. It helps to see things from the "other side".
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