Leasing Basics - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 02-20-2016, 10:43 AM Thread Starter
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Leasing Basics

this summer my instructor said I may be able to lease the horse I ride on, I really would enjoy it and it would be a great opportunity since I cannot afford my own horse. But I have never leased a horse before and I need some tips, any would help when I am at the barn especially safety tips. I have been riding for 2 years and I can canter comfortably and can take care of a horse. The horse I may be leasing is a 14 year old Appaloosa X gelding. He is a great beginners and dressage horse and we have a strong relationship and a easygoing temperament but also he has arthritis so I cannot jump but he's worth way more then getting to jump! I need some tips for keeping happy and healthy also keeping his joint okay
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post #2 of 9 Old 02-20-2016, 11:02 AM
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I would take advice from the owner over advice online! Good luck with the lease

“Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity”
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post #3 of 9 Old 02-21-2016, 11:24 AM
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Would this be a full lease or partial lease? I have partial leased two different horses now. The first one was my lesson horse. One thing I didn't think about was that partial lease of a lesson horse means that they will still be used for lessons for other people. I had the right to ride her three set days per week, but that didn't mean that she wasn't being ridden those other days, or sometimes the same day I would come to ride. For me that wasn't the most ideal situation, but it worked ok. My current lease is a privately owned horse at the same barn. I still get the three days of riding per week but I know that he's not being overworked. The owner and I work together really well and communicate with each other well. I know what she's doing with him and she knows what I'm doing.

Just make sure that you know and are clear with the expectations that you have and the barn owner has and that you're on the same page. If so it can be a great experience.
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post #4 of 9 Old 02-28-2016, 10:04 PM
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Not sure what advice you're looking for? You mention safety tips ...this should be something your instructor went over with you on the first day in the barn.

Honestly, unless I am misunderstanding what you're asking, if a prospective leaser of any of my horses was asking anyone other than myself - the owner - for advice, that lease would be over quicker than it could begin.
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post #5 of 9 Old 02-28-2016, 11:11 PM
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The first thing I would be working out how the lease works and if that's what you want.

Often it you're leasing a school horse it's quite different to more traditional leases and more resembles the ability to ride without supervision. So there might be times or days during the week you can ride on your own and in return you pay a weekly or monthly fee. I guess a main thing is to work out if it will be useful to you. In some cases the costs of a partial lease can be similar to equivalent time spent in riding lessons. If you're not able to utilise the riding time you may find yourself spending a fair bit more money than you need.

Before you consider it further I'd be asking some questions like:

How much will I be expected to pay?
When will I be able to ride? Are there certain days or times I need to ride?
Will I have exclusive use or exclusive use on certain days?
What can I do with the horse? Can I take him on trails? How many hours can I ride him for at a time?
What responsibilities will I have?

From there I would be evaluating if it's what you want to do.

As far as managing him all that information should come from your trainer. I imagine there is already a routine with feed, supplements etc in place and it will not be your responsibility to manage it.

Safety - after two years you do know this. Use your common sense and err on the side of caution.
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post #6 of 9 Old 02-29-2016, 07:49 AM
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As far as the medical side of the arthritis management goes, this is the responsibility of the owner. Like others have said, do not do anything (add supplements, call vet etc) by yourself.

What you can do when you ride unsupervised is make sure that you warm up/cool down properly. Also, most arthritic horses do better when they are ridden consistently, so it would be much better to ride lightly several times a week than come out twice a month and work the snot out of him.
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post #7 of 9 Old 02-29-2016, 07:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beverleyy View Post
Not sure what advice you're looking for? You mention safety tips ...this should be something your instructor went over with you on the first day in the barn.

Honestly, unless I am misunderstanding what you're asking, if a prospective leaser of any of my horses was asking anyone other than myself - the owner - for advice, that lease would be over quicker than it could begin.
I don't think there's anything wrong with asking questions here. If you don't know what you don't know, you don't even know what questions to ask the owner. I was completely ignorant about leasing when we started leasing our two horses, and I did come here for some advice.
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post #8 of 9 Old 02-29-2016, 04:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan1975 View Post
I don't think there's anything wrong with asking questions here. If you don't know what you don't know, you don't even know what questions to ask the owner. I was completely ignorant about leasing when we started leasing our two horses, and I did come here for some advice.
I do agree to some extent, however it really depends what advice OP is looking for. The original post wasn't very clear IMHO. If a person is looking for general advice, yes HF is a great place - however, if a person is looking for specific advice for a horse they do not own, they really do need to be going to the owner of the horse for that sort of advice.
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post #9 of 9 Old 02-29-2016, 06:03 PM
edf
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I can tell you some basic things- most which you probably know already.

As other's said, find out what the lease intails- you the only rider, or being used in lessons, other people lease... my situation was I did a share board ( I was to eventually take over ownership) So, I paid a smidge over half of what it cost to keep the horse. The horse was used in lessons so I had to yeild for that ( which was usually thursdays and sat) other than that, I had the right away. ( occasionally i'd come by a thursday, and have to wait which was fine). Plus side- I leased for very cheap. Down side- anything went wrong- i'd pay half. And it did. Actually, I disagreed with the initial diagnosis as to why the horse was lame, so I called the vet out and got x-rays and paid for it myself. The horse had navicular's disease not laminitis. So, i paid the vet bill.. and I still had to pay the lease even though I couldn't ride. ( that may be another important aspect-find out if you are expected to lease if the horse goes lame, be it your fault, not your fault, or someone elses fault if the horse is still used in lessons)

I also had free use of her tack( which included the horses winter blanket on the few rare times thehorse needed it), tho I bought my own bridle for cheap and started buying my own grooming supplies, but it will be good to know if you need to buy anything. I still use some of her equipment with her permission for my own horse ( as she uses some of mine and we are ok). Now, I personally don't agree with buying your own saddle- I know some places do this for a leased horse, but I don't see the point- what are the chances of it fitting your next lease horse or horse you eventually buy? But its something I would ask.

Another thing- are you paying monthly or do you have to commit to a time period? I did month to month, but mine was a special case and usually it was 3 months payment up front.

For the horsy stuff:


The very first time I rode the horse I was leasing when I leased- I was a tad nervous just because it was the first time without my instructor ( been riding there for 3 years). No real reason for being nervous, I just feared something would go wrong because if I don't have bad luck, I have no luck. So, just take your time. Saddle up slowly, warm up slowly, heck, you can even ride slowly. I am not the best at cantering, so I just walked/trotted, but mostly walked. I really observed the horse to make sure he wasn't upset with it just being him up there ( this horse was fine riding by himself)



One time I did start trotting too soon and the horse didn't feel right, so naturally I stopped riding and called my instructor down. I had checked all his hoofs and so did she, and she said I prolly just didn't warm him up enough ( it was winter) It was embarrassing- BUT if something doesn't feel right- stop. My instructed even said at least you had the common sense to stop even if it was something so silly as I should have warmed him up a little bit longer. Then, my routine involved a lot more hand walking to ensure I didn't make the same mistake. On the other hand- during the summer, the horse ended up being lame and I was the one one noticed it-honestly, I suspected something was off just walking up to the ring, did a nice long warm up, mounted, and when I eventually trotted it was obvious.

No one wants to not notice something wrong, but when you lease and ride on your own, I think having a keener eye to pick up if something isn't right is a good thing.

If you are leasing to prepare for horse ownership- take more interest in how the horse is fed, how to check to make sure the horse isn't loosing wieght, and keep a keen eye on his hoof care. That was one thing I noticed- I worried a lot more about what I was going to do when I rode and how everything else was put together. I got a nasty hoof care 101 with this horse which lead to me not purchasing.

You don't always have to ride when you go up. I spent A LOT of time just grooming or walking the horse around the ring.

Also, the horse got scratches, so there was a month time I stopped by nearly everyday to tend to the injury. The owner did too- we planned it out, but it really gives you the sense of the responsibility of caring for a horse and helps bond with the horse.

As far as the arthritis- find what the owner suggests ( most important), get advise here, and read up on it yourself. See if you can find the best solution and run it by the owner. I don't know too much other than the horse will do better moving around versus being stuck in a stall.


But most of all:

have fun! Leasing was a great experience. In a way, it can beat ownership because the cost isn't nearly as high. it won't be as drastic if something happens and you cannot afford to lease anymore versus not be able to own. I pretended I owned the horse I leased...LOL!
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