Leasing, boarding or owning - how do you do it? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 24 Old 05-15-2019, 01:46 AM
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My husband just decided I needed a horse and got Lulu for me so I didn't have time to learn about taking care of a horse. As a first time horse owner I can tell you that there is a huge learning curve when it comes to owing a horse. Lulu is at the trainer's barn and one of the things that I love is that I get to ask all the experienced horse people questions about horse care. I can't tell you how many times I pointed to a hoof (sometimes Lulu sometimes another horse) and asked, "Is that OK?" So I think a half lease would be a great way for you to spend more time with a horse and get to know him/her better and ease you into horse ownership.



And Lulu had horrible ground manners when I first got her! My trainer has been helping me and 99% of the time now she is a sweet horse.
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post #12 of 24 Old 05-15-2019, 08:11 AM
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Out of those three horses, I'd go with Donnie and avoid Sandman. The problem with a horse with slipping stifles is you won't be able to predict what will happen with his gait because he can't predict it. His leg might drop out from under him or he'll be unable to get into gait easily. Even what feels like a spook might just be him jumping from the stifle problem. When my horse's stifle catches he will often leap forward suddenly.

A horse with good ground manners and a slightly rougher gait like Donnie would be something you could learn to adapt to. A rougher but predictable gait is something you can learn to ride without having to deal with the unpredictability of stifles slipping and the horse's related reactions.
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post #13 of 24 Old 05-15-2019, 12:23 PM
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Weekly lessons are great. It never seems like enough time though!

The half-lease sounds like your best option for now. Choose the horse wisely, but if that one doesn't work out - you can always just lease another one I'm sure. That would give you more ride time, and you won't have nearly as many responsibilities as you would if you actually owned the horse.

I leased for years before I got my own horse. I enjoyed it a lot. There's nothing quite like having your 'own', but there's no rush to get there. Leasing is a great option. And cheaper. Just have fun!

Ride more, worry less.
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post #14 of 24 Old 05-15-2019, 01:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
As a young, shy person, who is aware of her/ his anxieties, I do NOT suggest owning your own horse . . . . for now.


Consider a half lease. In all honesty, any of the three you listed would work. If you worked with Sandman more, and if your instructor, OR, a different person , could show you how to create more authority, and thus more respect from him, he would probably become a really great horse to learn on. if you can master him, you will have gained so much self-confidence, you will feel 10 feet taller!


But, either of the other two is good, too. Spooking happens. it just does. If the horse is terribly spooky, then that's no fun at all. But, every time you ride through a spook, you cut a notch on your confidence pole, and you know that you are THAT MUCH more able to do it again, when it next happens.
Like I said above, I was just laying out my options. Don't really want to own yet.

I know that horses spook. I've fallen from a spook and ridden through 2-3 others. I don't really think that's what bothers me, but the fact that he FEELS like he's spooking. His stifles slip, and he'll stumble and shoot forward, or knock me off my diagonal. Makes it hard to sit the trot, too. He'll also sometimes go from a trot to a canter without a cue, like he did 4-5 times on the leadline yesterday. That combined with his ground manners just make me feel edgy around him.
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post #15 of 24 Old 05-15-2019, 01:12 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissLulu View Post
My husband just decided I needed a horse and got Lulu for me so I didn't have time to learn about taking care of a horse. As a first time horse owner I can tell you that there is a huge learning curve when it comes to owing a horse. Lulu is at the trainer's barn and one of the things that I love is that I get to ask all the experienced horse people questions about horse care. I can't tell you how many times I pointed to a hoof (sometimes Lulu sometimes another horse) and asked, "Is that OK?" So I think a half lease would be a great way for you to spend more time with a horse and get to know him/her better and ease you into horse ownership.



And Lulu had horrible ground manners when I first got her! My trainer has been helping me and 99% of the time now she is a sweet horse.
Leasing does seem to be my best option, I was just laying everything out. 🙂 Don't really want to own yet!
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post #16 of 24 Old 05-15-2019, 01:20 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
Out of those three horses, I'd go with Donnie and avoid Sandman. The problem with a horse with slipping stifles is you won't be able to predict what will happen with his gait because he can't predict it. His leg might drop out from under him or he'll be unable to get into gait easily. Even what feels like a spook might just be him jumping from the stifle problem. When my horse's stifle catches he will often leap forward suddenly.

A horse with good ground manners and a slightly rougher gait like Donnie would be something you could learn to adapt to. A rougher but predictable gait is something you can learn to ride without having to deal with the unpredictability of stifles slipping and the horse's related reactions.
I think that's one of my big problems with him - not that he's spooking, but he feels like he is, because of his stifles. He'll jump forward to catch himself most of the time. It's just very unsettling when I feel like his hind end is falling out from under me. It isn't an uncommon occurrence, it's every lesson, over and over again. It makes me tense up, which I know is bad, but I find it hard to stay loose and flexible when he's slipping and shooting forward and knocking me off my diagonal.

I've only ridden Donnie twice and couldn't keep him in a canter (He was the first horse I cantered on, so I bounced around a lot, it wasn't his fault. I was just a newbie and he wasn't having it. 😉 ), but he's sweet and has a good trot. He also jumps, which is something I'm looking to eventually do. I was just hoping to get more comfortable with the canter on a smoother horse (Sandman) before moving on to Donnie, but my problems with Sandman have caused me to go back to walking and trotting to try and build my confidence on him again.
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post #17 of 24 Old 05-15-2019, 01:22 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by PoptartShop View Post
Weekly lessons are great. It never seems like enough time though!

The half-lease sounds like your best option for now. Choose the horse wisely, but if that one doesn't work out - you can always just lease another one I'm sure. <img style="max-width:100%;" src="https://www.horseforum.com/images/smilies/icon_biggrin.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Very Happy" class="inlineimg" /> That would give you more ride time, and you won't have nearly as many responsibilities as you would if you actually owned the horse.

I leased for years before I got my own horse. I enjoyed it a lot. There's nothing quite like having your 'own', but there's no rush to get there. Leasing is a great option. And cheaper. Just have fun!
Hahaha, I know. Especially when you spend half your lesson steering your horse away from the water puddle!
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post #18 of 24 Old 05-15-2019, 11:13 PM
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You will be astounded at the progress you will make when you start riding twice a week. . . and even more at thrice a week. I always find that riding 3 times a week has twice the value of riding 2 times a week. It's as if you go over some kind of threshold.
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post #19 of 24 Old 05-16-2019, 07:21 AM
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I got back into riding about a year ago. I started taking some lessons on a friendís horse and like you, it just was not enough. I wanted to practice what I has learned in my lessons. I wanted to be in the saddle more. It was ME time and has always been my dream to own my own horse.


I asked my friend if I could get more ride time on her ands he offered me a 3/4 lease. She has another horse but he is three and is stillin training. I could ride her when I wanted unless she was taking her on a trail ride or camping. It worked out great for several months but the mare has heaves and she is 24 so I there were times I could not ride due to her health. My friend decided to semi-retire her and I understood. I didn't want to put any extra strain on her.


She is a beautiful flea bitten grey with wonderful ground manners. Steady and calm. She was the PERFECT horse to get back into riding. She would make a wonderful lesson horse for people just starting out or for people like me that are getting back into it after MANY years away.


There was another horse at the barn that an elderly woman owns. She was looking for help so she offered me to lease her.


It is working out fairly well. I still take lessons, although it was like starting out all over again. Josie was a 15.3 hand QH and Stella is a 14.3 3/4 Arabian. She is smaller, a lot more athletic, and still green to the most part and a lot less horse under me but in the end I have improved my knowledge about horses and my personal riding skills.


I have her at a full lease for $110 a month (cheap I know!)and I can ride her whenever I want. The owner is pretty much absent, she is 87 and she does not ride her. She is eleven now but was a halter showhorse. She was not broke to ride until she was nine and pampered like a fancy pooch so I have to put a lot more miles in the saddle but she is a good little horse, even if she is a Diva and has a resting *&%$# face! LOL


I ride at least three times a week (if it doesn't rain, good Lord it rains every other day it seems!). Sometimes I work her in round pen, sometimes I work her in the arena and sometimes I just ride in the field or on the trail.

I still have my dream of owning my own horse, just not financially ready yet. Although I have put money into her, I know I know, we all do it!

She needed a winter blanket. Her old one was too large and was pretty tore up and had no legs straps. I bought her a new saddle pad and reins. And I needed a lunge line, lead rope and some grooming supplies. I could go on but I think you can guess the owner does not have much money. She is on a fixed income so I try to help out with the horses needs if I can. She does pay for the shots and farrier.


I am hoping maybe by next year I can own my own horse but in the meantime the lease works out perfectly! It is a win, win for all three of us!
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post #20 of 24 Old 05-16-2019, 11:54 AM
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Although I could afford a horse, it just doesn't make sense, so I lease. I have a good horse that I lease for $250 a month, this gets me pretty much full access to her and the barns. I keep thinking I want to buy one, but in the long run it just makes more sense to do it this way.
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