Moving from Australia to USA with horses - HELP - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 35 Old 09-03-2014, 11:09 PM
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Location: OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chetak View Post
Hey,



My problems that I can think of so far:
It doesnt snow here so I have no idea how to prepare or care for a horse in those conditions (apparently Im not allowed to have heated stables, not allowed to move them to somewhere warm for the winter and absolutely not allowed to bring them inside haha)

What time of year are you planning to arrive in Ohio? If you can arrive around April/May, then would have some time to get acclimated. Why would you not be allowed to have them in a heated barn in winter? A LOT of barns up north like that have heat.

My horses are not stabled ever let alone for an entire season are kept out in their paddock all year round. Dealing with that change for them and me.

You can have your boarding situation include turn out on nice days/nights and only inside when the weather is either really foul or exceptionally cold. I try to keep my horses out 95+% of the time.

Obviously plants and weeds are different I have no idea what is dangerous and what isnt.
We dont have coyotes, bears, mountain lions or any other man-eating monsters how do you survive out there.

Most wild animals out here are very shy. If they are not shy they are either starving or rabid. That reminds me, have your horses vaccinated for Rabies before you come over.
What is boarding?? What are the rules??

Agistment. The rules are set by each individual barn. I'll put mine on here so you can see some that are fairly typical but they'll vary from barn to barn.

I have no idea what the laws are regarding horses and what are the rights of owners

Most laws pertaining to horses just define a minimum standard of care. There are laws that vary from state to state about how a barn can handle debt collections for back board. Some states are very strict and detailed and others not so much.

Where can you ride without getting eaten by the above monsters.

Really, most places you ride you won't see anything of concern. We also mostly ride in groups out here so you're not likely to be alone with no help.
Dreamcatcher Horse Ranch LLC



BARN RULES

1. Stable is open from 8:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. only, 7 days/week.

2. Boarders must make appointments to visit their horses after hours.

3. Shoes/Boots with heels are required for all boarders and visitors. NO EXCEPTIONS.

4. Helmets are required for 18 years and under ALL OF THE TIME.

5. NO DOGS allowed on premises.

6. Turn lights off when you leave an area.

7. NO SMOKING OR CHEWING TOBACCO, PERIOD.

8. NO drinking of ALCOHOLIC beverages on any part of the property associated with the stables.

9. Keep the aisle clean of tack, brushes, halters, hoof pickings or manure. If you or your horse put it there, clean it up.

10. ALL vehicles must be parked in designated areas.

11. No visitors allowed in stalls. Boarders may retrieve their horses from the stalls and properly tie their horses for visitors to pet. No outside riders permitted.

12. No visitors allowed in pasture. Boarders may enter the pasture to retrieve their own horse, ONLY.

13. Boarders may not handle any other equine than their own, without prior approval from management.

14. DO NOT FEED your equine. If you believe your equine needs its rations increased, please notify the Barn Owner. This doesnt apply to feeding your horse(s) treats that you bring from home.

15. Do not give treats to any equine other than your own unless you have written permission to do so on file with the stable.

16. Do not ride or handle your horse without proper safety equipment. THE STABLE WILL NOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE for any accident, injury, and/or death occurring on premises.

17. DO NOT RIDE on properties not designated as allowed riding areas. All property surrounding the stable is private property and you will be trespassing if you ride on other property. The stable WILL NOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE for any fines and or jail terms for trespassing on posted or non-posted properties.

18. Always mount and dismount outside.

19. No running or yelling in the barn or courtyard, especially when horses are present.

20. No bicycles or motorized vehicles in the barn.

21. Do not tie your horse with your reins. All horses are to be tied in the designated grooming areas with a lead rope and halter.

22. Turn horses out in pastures only, no turn out in the arena.

23. There are no tack lockers provided. If you wish to leave any equipment or tack, please furnish your own locker and lock. Otherwise, please take all equipment home with you when you leave each day. Stable is not responsible for lost or stolen items.

24. All injuries, accidents and damages must immediately be brought to our attention.

If you have any questions, see the Barn Owner.

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post #12 of 35 Old 09-03-2014, 11:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chetak View Post

OMG I completely forgot about the pro-gun lifestyle and rambos running around the bush. Do riders get shot often?? Australia has very strict gun laws here.

It may have happened to someone somewhere, but I cannot point to a single instance of a rider being accidentally shot by hunters. It's really not a big deal. You should learn when the hunting seasons are. Pay attention to the large game seasons. Deer, bear, elk and so on. They usually fall in the winter, so it may not even be an issue for you. If you choose to ride the trails during that time, wear blaze orange as previously suggested. You can get the fancy stuff at a sporting goods store. If you are in a big hunting area, you can get a simple vest from any roadside convenience store for a dollar or so. I do suggest that you stay on the trails and not go bustin' through the brush during hunting season.



In the horse world over there, do any of you come across many Australians? I know a few friends who have traveled over with their horsemanship clinics etc. Just wanting to know if i'm going to be the needle in the haystack so to speak or if some may have used Australian methods/training. Trying to get a grasp if assimilation will be easy or not.
I've met several Aussies, and a few Kiwis in the US. Only one Australian horse person. She seemed reasonably well adjusted. Our equine vet had done some studies on the brumbies during her college years.
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post #13 of 35 Old 09-04-2014, 12:30 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Sep 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerscout View Post
depending on how soon you move to ohio, the horses can have time to grow a coat for winter, but probably they will need blankets the first year, by next winter they should grow a coat ( you can still blanket if you want to)
Our plan is to move the horses towards the end of our summer start of your summer so they have time to adjust to the location change and then gradually adjust to the colder weather as it progresses. Country, plane, feed and winter would be just way too much for them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 4horses View Post
I would think your main concern would be transporting. If you have that figured out you should be good to go. Can you fly the horse's straight to ohio? I thought I read that horses had to come through Kentucky as that was one of the few airports that could support importing and quarantine.
Your correct only certain airports are equipped for equine importing and were quite lucky that a friend of the family in Ohio is experienced in importing from OS and will be arranging all transportation for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 4horses View Post
Will you be boarding or keeping the horse on your property?
My plan is to board for the first few months or winter to ensure Im surrounded by experienced locals, to give myself and the boys time to adjust and ensure we are all fully confident before we move them to our property. As things that we do here in Australia could be a major no-no over there. Ive grown up with horses my entire life, I break and re-train OTT horses here but Ill be out of my comfort zone in a strange place that I really know nothing about. So Ill need as much help as I can get starting off.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
Why would you not be allowed to have them in a heated barn in winter? A LOT of barns up north like that have heat.
This was just a joke with my partner and I. I know nothing and hes a country boy but not a horse one. I threatened to fill the stable up with portable heaters all winter just to keep the boys warm if I had to lol. So heated barns do exist that is fantastic thank you so much. This is definitely being added to our building plans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
That reminds me, have your horses vaccinated for Rabies before you come over.
Already onto it. Vaccinations were the first thing we looked into. Great advice though

Wow thank you for the list of rules. All the rules are very similar to the ones enforced at many properties over here. However, the 3 below I do have questions about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
11. No visitors allowed in stalls. Boarders may retrieve their horses from the stalls and properly tie their horses for visitors to pet. No outside riders permitted.
The no outside rider rule, is this across the board at most boardings. Is this just for other people bringing their horses to the property to ride with you or is it no one riding your horse that is boarded there?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
14. DO NOT FEED your equine. If you believe your equine needs its rations increased, please notify the Barn Owner. This doesnt apply to feeding your horse(s) treats that you bring from home.
Again is this across the board and is there some flexibility with this. Im a proud horse mumma and I wont lie I would get very defensive and honestly angry if I was told I couldnt feed my horse? Im gathering this is solely in place to stop double up feedings and ensure clear communication is kept between barn and owner. Im guessing if you arranged a schedule as to certain days the owner is responsible for feedings.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
23. There are no tack lockers provided. If you wish to leave any equipment or tack, please furnish your own locker and lock. Otherwise, please take all equipment home with you when you leave each day. Stable is not responsible for lost or stolen items.
Tack storage is it common to not provide this??

Thank you all so much again this information is amazing. As I said only once Ive thoroughly researched into a move this big will I make a decision as to if they boys will come or not. All your replies have eased my mind on so many things and in some ways it wont be too different I guess (still dreading this whole snow thing lol).
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post #14 of 35 Old 09-04-2014, 12:43 AM
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Not allowing other people to ride is about 50/50. Some (most) places will want the rider to sign a waiver so they can not be sued should they be injured. (Even in Arizona we have to sign waivers and AZ recognizes "equine activities" as "inherently dangerous" so you can't sue anyways -- people just like to cover themselves from any potential lawsuits) This will be more flexible in a smaller/private facility

Yes, feeding times should be well coordinated/communicated. In the states having the owner feed is usually called part-board.

I've never came across a barn that didn't allow tack to be kept on property (except maybe a breeding or retirement facility)

"I don't think he ever gave a thought to other people's opinions, which was just as well because they were often unkind."
-- James Herriot, All Creatures Great and Small
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post #15 of 35 Old 09-04-2014, 01:22 AM
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I have ridden with coyoties on trail. they ride with me because i stur up the rabbits. Horses are too big for them. a Lion really wont bother with a horse because its big and risky prey. Also a horse will smell it and "let you know" something is not ok. same with bears unless there are cubs, then pray your horse can outrun the bear.

In the winter their first season if they dont grow a good winter coat i would rug them. I rug my mare mostly because i wont want to deal with all the excess hair in the saddle and girth area (never dries and he is a pigsty all winter).
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post #16 of 35 Old 09-04-2014, 01:36 AM
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Ohio is not the Wild West. other than taking care during hunting season to not go out wearing your brownest clothing into the woods, you'll be fine. and they don't have deadly poisonous insects and few snakes, too, so that'll be nice.

I think you'll find the horses adapt better than you do. just bring some of their feed with you to make the change gradual.

there are Aussies around, here and there. folks will love your exotic accent, so make the most of it!
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post #17 of 35 Old 09-04-2014, 08:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chetak View Post

The no outside rider rule, is this across the board at most boardings. Is this just for other people bringing their horses to the property to ride with you or is it no one riding your horse that is boarded there?

The no outside rider rule is because I'm very small and have limited parking. I just don't have room for folks to haul their horses in to ride and socialize. We're in the middle of some AWESOME trail country, so unless someone is schooling for a show or in a lesson, it's rare to actually ride in an arena anyhow. I'm pretty much the only one who uses the arena on a regular basis. Also it's for quarantine purposes. When new horses come on my property they are quarantined for 30 days and not allowed to mix. You can't control that with haul ins.

Again is this across the board and is there some flexibility with this. Im a proud horse mumma and I wont lie I would get very defensive and honestly angry if I was told I couldnt feed my horse? Im gathering this is solely in place to stop double up feedings and ensure clear communication is kept between barn and owner. Im guessing if you arranged a schedule as to certain days the owner is responsible for feedings.

If you're around at feeding time and want to feed your horse, I wouldn't have a problem with you giving your horse his food. The main thing is, I feed really well and wouldn't want someone coming in and feeding more and the horse getting too fat or sick from over graining. The horses here all have access to grass hay 24/7 so the only extra feeding would be graining and so, for the horse's health I just made it a rule to not have anyone but me do the actual feeding. If an owner wanted to pass out the bucket when they were here, even if it wasn't regular feed time, I'd be ok with it, just let me know so I don't do it again in an hour. I don't do partial board here so the owner would never "be responsible" to feed, but as long as we were communicating, they would certainly be welcome to it when they were here visiting their horse.

Tack storage is it common to not provide this??

I'm really small and have limited space. I didn't actually set out to do boarding but I keep getting asked by folks who get unhappy because their horses don't get fed or the facilities are allowed to go downhill or ......just stuff. So, when I do take a boarder, I will allow them to keep their tack here in the feed barn where I keep my working tack but I don't want any confusion about whose tack is whose and I don't want to spend the money for lockers and such, so if the boarder wants to leave their tack here, they need to provide their own lockers and storage containers for their stuff and I'll give them a corner in the feed barn to put in. I think most boarding facilities that have a lot of boarders, do lessons and stuff like that, do have allocated tack rooms and lockers or places for you to put your tack.
Some of my rules may seem a little different or really basic, but since I don't advertise for boarders and frequently end up with a boarder who doesn't have the basics for safety and horse care I spelled out some things like the boots. I had one gal who kept showing up in her strappy little flip flops and wanted to go out into the pasture with youngsters and their protective mommas. I got tired of telling her she needed boots, so I just put it in the rules. The hard hat thing is because of insurance.

The no dog thing is not common but I have free range chickens and I don't want to have to shoot a boarder's dog for killing my hens.

I hope some of this helps, it's really not as Aboriginal here in the states as it sounds.
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post #18 of 35 Old 09-04-2014, 08:32 AM
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re: Coyotes, Bears and Mountain Lions.

If you will be in Ohio it won't be a problem. Bears sightings are very rare here, mountain lions even more rare and probably non existent. We do have Coyotes, but you will probably not see one when riding. If you do, they will run away very quickly. They won't bother you or your horse.
M
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post #19 of 35 Old 09-04-2014, 08:55 AM
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What part of Ohio? The north, by Lake Erie, is much snowier and windier than the south of the state.
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post #20 of 35 Old 09-04-2014, 11:07 AM
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I don't know where you are getting your information from but your views and concerns of horsekeeping in the US are a little twisted.

Cold is not as big an issue as heat. Your horses will love the cool crisp mornings and by their second winter will be out there in the pasture digging through the snow looking for a tasty morsel. A heated barn is for us not them. A closed up heated barn can be detrimental to their health. Mine are out 24/7/365 in the heat of the summer or belly deep in snow. Horses start laying the foundation for their winter coat very early in the season. I bought an OTTB out of Arizona early fall many years ago and he did have trouble staying warm (ended up blanketing and stalling him) that first winter but after that has not had any problems. Getting them here late spring will set them up for an easy transition.

We don't have wild animals and gun toting individuals roaming the streets. The coyotes that you will come across are just hunting for a rabbit and will run from you. Your horses will learn to ignore them when they cut through the pasture.

Ohio is known to have some of the most fertile and productive soil in the entire US. They tend to have beautiful pastures and have the rainfall to enjoy a long productive growing season. Hay is cheap and plentiful. Noxious weeds are going to be a problem no matter where you are but horses are selective eaters and as long as they are not forced to eat them by lack of food, they will leave anything toxic behind. My horses do enjoy some noxious weeds and I'm not going to worry about that they do eat. Their diet will change probably for the better because you will have a better selection of hays available year round. We don't have to fill in the gaps with copra or chops.

There are no hard and fast rules when it comes to boarding. Common sense isn't a prerequisite at some places. People have rules to address issues that have come up and are unique to their situation while other have a free for all. With having set rules, you know what the expectations are of you and the other boarders. When you don't have any rules, chaos ensues.
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