Is my horse too thin? - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 03:42 AM
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I do not think worming every 3 months is healthy. My horses are piggy fat, I use wormer twice a year, sometimes 3 times a year. If they don't have worms its a waste of money.
The beet pulp should be soaked , start with a pound a feeding and add more until you are feeding about 2 lbs dry a feeding. You can also add some corn,olive, canola oil , whichever is cheapest to the beet pulp. Do you have access to alfalfa pellets ? If so add some , start off at about one pound then increase per feeding recommendations on the bag. Grass hay should be about a 14% protein , so just increase the amount, let him free feed . I hope he picks up his weight soon . he looks like a sweet horse. You should never be able to see the horses bones .
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post #32 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 04:18 AM
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Originally Posted by stevenson View Post
I do not think worming every 3 months is healthy. My horses are piggy fat, I use wormer twice a year, sometimes 3 times a year. If they don't have worms its a waste of money.
The beet pulp should be soaked , start with a pound a feeding and add more until you are feeding about 2 lbs dry a feeding. You can also add some corn,olive, canola oil , whichever is cheapest to the beet pulp. Do you have access to alfalfa pellets ? If so add some , start off at about one pound then increase per feeding recommendations on the bag. Grass hay should be about a 14% protein , so just increase the amount, let him free feed . I hope he picks up his weight soon . he looks like a sweet horse. You should never be able to see the horses bones .
Your horse is piggy fat so unlikely to have a high worm load, a poor horse might and this can persist beyond infrequent worming. Some horses, depending upon their management, do need higher levels or wormer. I also worm infrequently and do worm counts, but if my horse was struggling I would check worms and reconsider. Tapeworms can now be tested by a saliva test but used to be just a blood test which is expensive. Encysted redworm cannot be tested for.
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post #33 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 09:53 AM
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I would get a lightweight and a medium. Put the medium when it drops below..erm about 5 C? (40F) I would definitely be blanketing him in this condition. Start the lightweight below 15 (60F) if rainy and 10 (50F) if not. (Ideally you would have a sheet for that then lightweight for a little colder, but it's not necessary)
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post #34 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by avrajack View Post
Dreamcatcher, my last dose of Equinox was on 10th september, so what would you recommend that I give him next and when? His fly mask isn't rubbing him, those scars are from when he was younger. He used to be a carriage horse and was extremely neglected. He has scars all over him from the badly fitting harness and he was also hobbled - you can see the scars and where his hair has turned white in the photos. Luckily he was rescued 10 years ago now but the scars, I've been told, are permanent
Our summer is almost over but the winter is fairly mild, no frost but quite a damp atmosphere. My husband is building a stable/corral for him but also need to buy a new rug as the one that I was given is too big for him and so old that its falling to pieces. Bearing in mind that it rarely gets below 2 -3 degrees C but rains a lot, what sort of rug should I be looking for? I was thinking possibly a medium weight?
And a huge thanks for all the positive comments - I've gone from feeling distraught to thinking I can actually do this!
Avrajack, I would use an Ivermectin type dewormer, right now and in a month I would deworm him again with a combo dewormer that has Praziquantel and/or Moxidectin in it. I prefer Quest Plus because it's both. You need to be able to get a weight for your horse to use the combo dewormer so you don't give too much. Ideally, you could just run a stool sample to the vet and get a recommendation as to what to use and when. I understand that is not possible for you.

My recommendations are based on what I used to do for the very starved rescues I've rehabbed and how my vet told me to do things then. What I do for my fat sassies now is completely different than what I'm suggesting to you, now, for him underweight.

The main thing your horse needs for shelter is a wind break, so your husband is building that, GREAT! If he can include a way to shut the horse inside on really wet days, that will help a lot too. I like Yogiwick's suggestions for the blankets, that's how I do things too. Ideally, you can get a nice windproof and waterproof sheet, layering is key. If you have a sheet, you can start putting that on him around 10-15 C. They just can't thermoregulate properly when they're too thin and/or have a heavy worm load. Then, as it gets colder, you can upgrade to the lightweight around 10 F and as it gets colder than that you can layer the sheet over the lightweight down to 4 C, then if things get wet, you will have the medium one to put on while the other 2 dry. If you get below freezing, then again, you can double up.

A horse can be thin and ok, wet and ok, but a thin horse in wind and rain will be cold and suffering. That's why I suggest a way to keep him in on rainly days. If it's just damp out, high humidity and cold, then layering and extra hay fed will keep him warm.

Here's some links to my favorite sheets & blankets that have served me well over the years. Some are fairly expensive, but IMO, worth it. Others are less but last well for the money and are easy to replace.

I think this is the best turnout sheet I've ever had. I bought 3 almost 10 years ago and they still look new, despite a herd of rowdy horses.

RAIN TURTLE - Products

I buy my medium and heavy blankets, here, they stand behind their products and will make right any problems. And the blankets are pretty mid range prices.

StormShield® 1680D VTEK™ MARATHON Bellyband Turnouts in VTek V-Free at Schneider Saddlery

Normally, my horses have a light, mid and heavy blanket, plus just a sheet. We get cold here, have ice storms and such and the wind howls in the winter. So, my rule of thumb is, if it's extremely windy but dry they can stay out. Anyone older, younger or thinner gets a sheet. If it starts to rain, snow, sleet, they go in the barn until it quits. I blanket for the horse's comfort. If they're shivering, they're trying to warm up. I stick a hand under the sheet or blanket and feel the horse's body temperature and if they're cool, I add a layer or switch to the next heavier weight. Anytime it's wet & cold, they go into the barn and I put down extra hay so they can keep warm by eating too. The hay will ferment in their gut and the heat from digesting it helps keep them warm and toasty. If you can keep your guy warm while you feed him up, he'll gain weight even if you have a cold winter. If he burns up all the calories trying to stay warm, he'll drop weight. So rug him up, just not enough to make him sweat, that's too much.

So, so picky, aren't we?
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post #35 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Cappaloosa View Post
The first picture is how he should look. Some people may think he is overweight but they may just be used to seeing horses thinner than him. It is always good to have a little 'cushion' on old horses incase they get sick etc. They generally have a better chance of recovering and returning to healthy if they have a little extra weight to work with.
I am one of those who thinks he is overweight in the first pic, I can't believe how many people think that he looks at a good weight there. To me his ideal weight lies between the first and second pics.

You have been given lots of advice OP, hope that you can get him back to looking great.
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post #36 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 06:39 PM
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DreamCatcher - I would never worm that frequently unless my horse was in a herd and there was a known problem. That much wormer can't be good. To back that up, I would need fecal counts - otherwise it's just scarey to me.

When I had more than one horse, and my horse occasionally spent time with other horses, I wormed in the spring and in the fall. Now I worm once a year.

So, just another note to the OP - Use an "all purpose wormer" like ivermectin and then praziquantel a couple of weeks later. If no improvement, then you really need to see if you can get a fecal count done. I don't know what's available there. Or contact the previous owners and ask them what their worming schedule was. I'm sure they'd be glad to tell you.
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post #37 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Golden Horse View Post
I am one of those who thinks he is overweight in the first pic, I can't believe how many people think that he looks at a good weight there. To me his ideal weight lies between the first and second pics.

You have been given lots of advice OP, hope that you can get him back to looking great.
I think it's hard to tell specifics from the first pic. If he is overweight it's not hugely so. I don't see it but I'm not saying he's not as it's an awful picture. Also don't think anyone said he was overweight based on that picture. I believe the overweight comments came from people who saw the horse in person that weren't used to seeing a healthy well rounded horse.

Either way he is a healthy weight there, if overweight he's still not by much and is hugely underweight now. Specifics don't matter at this point.
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post #38 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by stevenson View Post
...
The beet pulp should be soaked , start with a pound a feeding and add more until you are feeding about 2 lbs dry a feeding... .
Some beet pulp must be soaked. For example, we don't get flakes here, only cubes and they absolutely must be soaked. So the OP should ask the manufacturer or supplier how to present the feed.
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post #39 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by NorthernMama View Post
Some beet pulp must be soaked. For example, we don't get flakes here, only cubes and they absolutely must be soaked. So the OP should ask the manufacturer or supplier how to present the feed.
Agree it probably doesn't *need* to be soaked.

However, for an unhealthy horse living in a dry area I think it would benefit him to have it soaked even if the feed itself does not require it.
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post #40 of 98 Old 10-04-2014, 07:02 PM
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Yogiwik - I think you may have mis-read my post. I am saying that sometimes beet pulp DOES NEED to be soaked. It depends on the product. The cubes we have here can not be fed to a healthy, well-toothed horse without soaking first. It is dangerous to do so due to choking hazard mostly, though some also say there are impaction risks. The cubes are about 1-1/2" square - 2" square. Just the right size to cause problems.
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