Nasty in stall? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 32 Old 11-13-2014, 04:16 PM
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There's a ton of very good advice in this thread......

My suggestion, if it's possible, is to lead them out of the stall, tie them to a hitching post and groom them there.....

For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.
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post #22 of 32 Old 11-18-2014, 11:19 PM Thread Starter
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So, I had my lesson last Thursday and as I was going to be late, the girls left him tacked up in his stall for me with the halter on over the bridle. I headed over to his stall, prepared to deal with him and went to grab his halter and bam, he got me! It wasn't a hard bite, but I did have a bruise the next day. I'm proud to say I gave him a good smack on the neck and went to grab his halter again and he came after me once again. I yelled no, grabbed the halter and gave a good yank with a nasty eyeball and he seemed to respect me a little bit more after that.

We had an ok ride and when we were finished, I took him into his stall and started to untack. He was ok throughout this and I finished and left. Now, I groom on Sundays in exchange for these lessons and this Sunday went horrible. I think I've lost almost all my confidence and the horses I was comfortable with before, I am not so comfortable with! They would act up sometimes and I could handle it but now, I'm a little freaked out. I did come home and have a good cry that night because I'm really disappointed that I let him get the best of me and that I'm scared now. I guess I just have to build up that confidence again, huh.

I just thought I'd give you guys an update! Maybe I'm just a chicken, haha. I won't give up though!
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post #23 of 32 Old 11-19-2014, 01:31 AM
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IMO that is a poor trainer. Yet again you have lost confidence You need matched with a mellow, I don't care horse.
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post #24 of 32 Old 11-19-2014, 01:52 PM
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So sorry you got bit, it can scare a person into losing their confidence.

But good for you showing the horse it wasn't right, you did good.

All I can suggest is possibly finding another barn with better trained horses and a trainer willing to work with you on any issue you may have come up.

It's totally okay with being upset and being a 'chicken' (trust me I'm a big chicken about certain things.) You'll be fine in the end, trust me on that.

"They see me rollin, They hatin, Patrolling they tryin to catch me ridin dirty"
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post #25 of 32 Old 11-22-2014, 10:03 AM
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I'm also concerned that it sounds like there are so many "nasty" mannered horses at the barn you are learning to ride at. While even the very best barns I've ridden at have had a grump or two in residence - usually an older, curmudgeonly type who knew the routine, knew how he/she liked things and didn't appreciate any deviance from those parameters - a whole barn full of cranky, ill-mannered horses is cause for concern. Generally, well kept horses whose physical and mental needs are being met are happy horses.

Does there seem to be any long term plan in place to correct the unwanted behaviors? Are changes being made to feeding, turnout, etc? Does barn staff ensure there is consistency in handling in the way misbehavior is being handled? If you don't see these things happening and if when you ask about them, your concerns are just brushed aside you should strongly consider finding another place to ride.

I'm not saying that a good barn will NEVER have a horse that bites or is pushy, but a good lesson barn won't put you in a situation where you feel so uncomfortable. Confidence is so much harder to build back up than it is to damage or destroy - work with a trainer who will understand that you are genuinely fearful or uncomfortable and help you to improve, not one that leaves you unsupervised to "get over it" on your own.
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post #26 of 32 Old 11-25-2014, 02:36 PM Thread Starter
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See, the horses are mean to ME but the normal day time people and some of the other girls have no problem. It's people like me, that are a little less confident and scared that they take advantage of. I really think it's me thats the problem. This Sunday, I was back and had a much, much better day. I didn't let anyone take advantage of me (that I worked with, which are generally the easier horses). There were a few smacks given, I'm proud to say. One of the mares went to kick and I gave her a smack and then no more problems! :)

The problem with finding a new place to ride is that I get lessons for free here in exchange for work. I really can't afford to pay for lessons out of pocket right now and this is really the only way I can ride. I was doing really well for a while too and it was just a couple horses that gave me trouble. Maybe like 5 out of the 20 there. Then I got bit (from one of the five) and it went downhill for a bit. I am feeling much more confident now and can work with the ones I worked with before.

I have a bit of a conflict though about the hitting. I know everyone says that its okay, but I do feel kind of bad. A couple girls have also mentioned that you don't need to hit the horses, I don't really understand, haha. Are they in the wrong or is there another way to do this that doesnt require hitting? A smack on the neck was definitely successful for me on Sunday but...I've seen girls be reprimanded for that before. Although...not by the barn owner. I guess I'm just asking if this is the best way? I'm sure you won't have to always hit them, right? They'll eventually learn that you're to be respected and that kind of stuff is not tolerated.

Thanks guys for all your help!
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post #27 of 32 Old 11-25-2014, 04:09 PM
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You have a sharp elbow-use it. When you enter his stall, look at his ears. Friendly ears are forward, nasty ears are back. If they are back, bend your arm and flap your elbow, like a chicken. If he hits it, oh well. Any time you are around him do this randomly. They don't like getting hit around the mouth and this works more like a warning than punishing after the bite. You're not hitting him, he's doing it to himself and don't let anyone tell you it will make him head shy, nonsense.



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post #28 of 32 Old 11-26-2014, 09:06 PM
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As Saddlebag said it's nonsense to let them tell you otherwise.

If they (other boarders/ lesson kids, or barn staff) complain then ask them to show you how they prefer to do it, if they can't, won't or get absolutely no results from whatever they show you, then ignore them for the most part, if it does work then go ahead and give it a try so long as it doesn't endanger you., and you feel comfortable doing it.

Before you ask them to show you, ask them why they think it's wrong. If you get some kind of ' Oh you'll make them head shy.' ' You'll make them hate you.' ' You shouldn't be mean to the pretty ponies.' type answer then well, you'll have to likely just go about your business if they can't or won't offer up a good enough solution.

Don't let it get you down when people say those things, or when things don't go right. Things will look up and you'll be happier when you become more confident.

I am concerned that the horses (you said 5?) seem so ill tempered towards you and what I'm assuming from your description are beginner riders. A stable should have very sweet/ even tempered horses available for the newest riders and handlers, saving the harder cases for the more advanced riders.

"They see me rollin, They hatin, Patrolling they tryin to catch me ridin dirty"
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post #29 of 32 Old 11-26-2014, 09:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newlndnfire View Post

I have a bit of a conflict though about the hitting. I know everyone says that its okay, but I do feel kind of bad. A couple girls have also mentioned that you don't need to hit the horses, I don't really understand, haha. Are they in the wrong or is there another way to do this that doesnt require hitting? A smack on the neck was definitely successful for me on Sunday but...I've seen girls be reprimanded for that before. Although...not by the barn owner. I guess I'm just asking if this is the best way? I'm sure you won't have to always hit them, right? They'll eventually learn that you're to be respected and that kind of stuff is not tolerated.

Thanks guys for all your help!
I've owned my own horses for many years and not one of them bites. One or 2 of the young ones might try it a couple of times, and especially with someone that they think won't kill them, they'll try it. But by the time they are 1 year old, nobody kicks or bites because they absolutely know that it is not allowed. I start out fairly nice and gentle and just push their face away from me, before they have a chance to bite. If they keep it up, they get a pop, but not really a slap, on the cheek. If that's not enough, and with the colts it's frequently not, then the 3rd time they open their mouths, they get an open handed slap to the side of the muzzle with their mouths still open. It makes a really loud POP but doesn't hurt them. Then noise and my body language at that point really surprises them, once they've gone that far I let them know that I am HUGE and ready to eat them. In all my years, I've only had 2 colts that pushed even further and them I actually let pinch me and while they were attached on my arm, I reached down and bit them on their tender little noses and didn't let go until they were backing up. Didn't break any skin, no blood or marks, but those 2 got the message. They also were the first 2 in line for gelding when it got cold.

With grown up horses who open their mouths and want to come at me, I go straight to slapping the living fire right out of them, right in the mouth, and I go after them immediately with a whip and back them up FAST, until they lick and chew. When I go after them, they know that I am breathing fire and they had better start apologizing. If anyone said anything to me about going after the horse, if they were the horse's owner, I'd verbally go after them for not teaching their horse manners. I have told more than one boarder to go find another boarding situation if they didn't want to teach their horse respect and objected to me teaching their horse respect. That is absolute nonsense, these things weigh over 1000 pounds to your 100 lbs, you totally have to make them understand that certain things just are not going to fly.
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post #30 of 32 Old 11-26-2014, 10:52 PM Thread Starter
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Those 5 in particular are generally used for the more advanced riders, well...except the one I ride, haha. I guess though...some of the others can be a little naughty at times but I usually don't have a problem with them and they straighten up quick once they realize they can't scare you off with a 'im going to bite you' look.

Now that you mention it though...there's really only one or two horses that won't bother trying to get away with anything. Maybe there is an issue, I wouldn't know though. They are usually outside for like 6 hours a day and then they're inside now that its winter. When it's summer, they're out over night and come in for a few hours during the day for lessons. I don't think the daytime people/barn owner have issues what so ever, I think its just the people they don't see as often. Unfortunately, I cannot ride anywhere else at the time and I've kinda grown attached to some of the people there (and the horses!).

I have another question though. When I enter go into this horses stall (the one I ride and the one that bite me), he instantly pins his ears. Even if he doesn't have food or anything. What can I do at this point to insure he DOESN'T bite me, lol. I would really like to avoid that happening again, freaking hurt! I am more scared of him now, as before I would just walk in like I had a purpose and grab his halter to get control and that's when he got me. I did give him a smack on the neck but I KNOW that when I go tomorrow, he's going to try it again. I guess I'll just give him a good smack for that?

Sorry for all the questions, haha. You guys are just really helping me. :)
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