In need of desperate help! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 09:37 PM Thread Starter
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shes a tb cross connermara.

well in that five years i had the odd few lessons but never a tb. the previous owners to me bought her from the riding school, so i don't know to much about that. they said she had "more potential" than to be a schooling pony. She is only 14.1 hands.

I think your all right to be honest! its just hard to admit it:p

i think its when i tried her she was so calm and relaxed and popped the few jumps fine, i just don't understand whats happened?

however every time i come off i always get back on and do it again and every time she refuses a jump i make her do it. does that not count for something?:)

i do think she is a bit much for me tho! and my experience is probably intermediate level rider. I started at 5 and am now 19. Ive always loved jumping and having a gallop in the field so when she started running out of them i think thats what knocked my confidence as I've never had a horse do that to me before.. but they were all schooling ponies.
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post #12 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 09:41 PM Thread Starter
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Skyseternalangel

I've been riding since i was 5 and stopped at 14-15 , had a few on and off lessons and am now 19.

its the potential for her bolting and running out off jumps that scares me. The falling off part doesn't bother me.

My riding instructor says that i also have a tendency to lean slightly forward in my seat meaning I'm not as balanced as i should be which she thinks is hence why I'm falling off when she spooks?
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post #13 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 09:53 PM
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Can you stop jumping and work on flatwork until she listens better to you?

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #14 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 09:57 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
Can you stop jumping and work on flatwork until she listens better to you?
i suppose i could, what kind of things should i do?

and what about the spooking?


thanks:)

*** also when do i know when shes ready to move back on to jumps?
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post #15 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 10:15 PM
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I would try to trade her for a well trained, seasoned horse. New horse, new rider may sound good, but in reality it ends up being new horse, no rider.
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post #16 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 10:19 PM
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Another thing to keep in mind with TB's is that they can be different day to day, rider to rider.

I've seen one particularly hot TB at our barn who can be a total and complete spaz when in heat, or on a cool fresh crisp day, but 48 hours later be much calmer. Sometimes they're hot in the morning but not in the evening. Sometime the opposite. She ALWAYS needs to be longed before riding...speaking of which, are you doing that?

A TB should always have you on your toes, don't ever expect anything less. There's only one I dare back at our barn (I'm an intermediate rider at best) and she's not a full TB, but a cross..but I tell you, she can go like the wind and would like nothing more than to take me there all the time - I've had more spills off of her in 6 months of riding than the previous 20 years before that. But I've learned a lot. ;)

With regards to your ability, it'd be my suggestion to step back to a lower level horse for a while, regain your confidence and skills, and perhaps consider working with a trainer to help you work back into your new horse and see if it's going to be a fit. Be prepared for the possibility that the answer to that is "no".. I agree with others that she has your number and is starting to take advantage of you, especially if she was an ex-schoolie (and didn't have these issues), and even moreso if (as you mentioned) an experienced rider got on her and immediately "whipped her into shape" more or less.
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post #17 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 10:27 PM
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I've had two TB's and have shown both over fences. My first one was VERY well trained, almost "push button" and had dressage points but he would take off and lose his mind every once in a while and always managed to do it with new riders.

My second was even more temperamental but I bought him unbroken and untouched at about 5, so he was young and inexperienced. He wouldn't even let anyone else hold him at a show, without a ruckus.

As private pilot said, you always have to be on your toes with a TB, even on the ground.
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post #18 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oliviaandherhorse View Post
i suppose i could, what kind of things should i do?

and what about the spooking?


thanks:)

*** also when do i know when shes ready to move back on to jumps?
Walk, trot, canter, leg yielding, different tempos of walk of trot, and of canter, walk to canter, figure eights, trotting over calveletti, trotting over ground poles, cantering over ground poles. Play with speed.

This isn't a list you just go and do and check it off. These are things you should be able to do with your horse in a controlled and happy way. What makes the bolting make you nervous but falling off not make you nervous? If it's adrenaline, then you need to start gently pushing your comfort zone under the guise of a trainer.

When you and your horse can trot at different speeds and canter at different speeds, handle poles with good timing and without rushing, not motorcycle on turns and do balanced fight eights or serpentines, handle canter from a walk BY PREPARING your horse by being good at transitions to trot and cantering beforehand, being able to influence/move the haunches or the shoulders independently from the horse.. then I bet you will have a better result when you go back to jumping.

She's likely excited, unbalanced, a little unsure if she can do it despite physically being able to.. so it's good to go back to flatwork to work on these things. Not just for you, but for her.

Basically work on your communication and compromising on things. If you don't like to go fast, only go fast when you ask her to instead of allowing her to just go fast because she wants to.
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"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #19 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 10:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EponaLynn View Post
He wouldn't even let anyone else hold him at a show, without a ruckus.

As private pilot said, you always have to be on your toes with a TB, even on the ground.
Wholeheartedly agree.

The earlier mentioned retired TB at our barn has a well known history for being a total goofball with some people (he likes to spaz coming in from turnout and walks sideways and backwards half the way) but is always a perfect gentleman for me oddly enough. But he'll pin on me when I give him his morning grain, but won't do it for others. In the crossties he's a big teddybear, but lead him to his stall and Mr. GrumpyPants comes back out in a split second.

The hotheaded TB mare can be a total witch with me sometimes headed out for turnout but is cooler with others. Sometimes is tempermental when you come in her stall, sometimes just wants to mooch a scritch behind the ears. And sometimes she's cool as a cucumber no matter what. The next time she'll pin and try to line you up if she's in a mood.

The one thing I've come to learn with TB's is exactly that - always be ready for the unexpected, and when you're on them, always ride ready.

As an intermediate rider a TB would be my last horse of choice, honestly, although I'm more of a pleasure rider than anything else - I respect those who desire the challenge of a TB so long as you've reached the experience level to be safe there, and have the time available to refine the skillset needed to make it all successful. Not everyone has both.

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post #20 of 51 Old 11-17-2014, 10:46 PM
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If you really love her, and don't want to sell her, you can do what I did. I bought the horse I loved, and paid my trainer to train me and him separately until we were both at a skill level for each other. Now we get to take our lessons together. I'm really happy I did it that way, because now I have a horse with unlimited showing potential, vs buying a ploddy beginner horse that I would outgrow and have to sell because of that. I think it comes down to how much training/lesson time you have access to. If you do have it, then just keep working on it. If you don't, then you should get an easier horsie.
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