Need help! In over my head?! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 21 Old 08-30-2014, 10:00 AM
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you really should not be working with them on your own at all. horses are big and dangerous, especially ones that are wild like that.

you need to hire a professional. if you cant afford that, then the sad simply truth is that you need to give them to someone who can.

if you want to get involved in horses, this is not a good way. i suggest selling/rehoming the two mares and start taking regular lessons at a commercial barn. after several years when you are ready for your own horse, then you can buy one that fits your skill level.

even if you can afford to send the two away to training, i still think rehoming them is the only responsible thing to do
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post #12 of 21 Old 08-30-2014, 10:13 AM
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I know you feel like you are doing what's best for these mares by giving them a nice home, but they need more than that. They need someone who can handle them and show them how they're supposed to behave.

In my mind, you have two options. Send them both off to a trainer or find them a new home.
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post #13 of 21 Old 08-30-2014, 10:41 AM
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Ditto what everyone has already said.


I am also sure they are PMU mares and these horses are not treated kindly. Actually the words "cruel and inhumane" come to mind. Some of the adult mares can never be completely rehabilitated.

For the record, the human female product "Premarin" is a product of these mares. The "ingredients" gathered after foals are born.

It takes a very experienced horseman to work with these mares. I have seen some of them first hand when a rescuer brought a semi load of them down from Canada to a rescue facility in Southern California, quite a few years back.

Seeing those mares and the foals they gave birth to (all in the interest of harvesting the placenta) was an awful experience for me.
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post #14 of 21 Old 08-30-2014, 12:29 PM
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I would get a trainer...either one to come to you or send those mares out to them.

AND THEN I suggest getting some riding lessons on a school horse. You need to learn balance and how to properly cue a horse so you don't confuse your horses and frustrate yourself. Even after 60-90 days with a trainer these mares will still be green and will need a rider/handler who has a basic knowledge as to how to handle a horse.

You have a task ahead of you...not an impossible one but one that will require dedication and some (maybe lots) dollars on your part.

Horse fact I believe you are learning...There is no such thing as a FREE horse.

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, it's because your tactics suck. ~ Marine 1SGT J. Reifinger
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post #15 of 21 Old 08-30-2014, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
Ditto what everyone has already said.


I am also sure they are PMU mares and these horses are not treated kindly. Actually the words "cruel and inhumane" come to mind. Some of the adult mares can never be completely rehabilitated.

For the record, the human female product "Premarin" is a product of these mares. The "ingredients" gathered after foals are born.

It takes a very experienced horseman to work with these mares. I have seen some of them first hand when a rescuer brought a semi load of them down from Canada to a rescue facility in Southern California, quite a few years back.

Seeing those mares and the foals they gave birth to (all in the interest of harvesting the placenta) was an awful experience for me.
I thought the main product, the estrogen, came from harvesting the urine?

nowadays, the foals tend to be more carefully bred, and have some value in and of themselves. and there are fewer such farms. and only becuase of the huge outcry by people insisting that at least the conditions be made more humane.
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post #16 of 21 Old 08-30-2014, 04:15 PM
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PMU not the uterus. . Pregnant Mare Urine. They are stalled, and a large bag attached to their behinds,
it collects the urine. It is then collected. They only get a break when foaling and nursing, and then back on then line they go. There are some mares that have been broke/trained, as these PMU farms went all over buying up mares when there was a lot of farms. I had 2 pmu mares, one is still here, the other was put down as she was dangerous, seriously dangerous. I have the filly, now mare, from the one that was put down, and she is sweet as pie. The other mares foal died, it was septic, born very ill and after a grand spent trying to save him, he died.
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post #17 of 21 Old 08-30-2014, 04:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
Ditto what everyone has already said.


I am also sure they are PMU mares and these horses are not treated kindly. Actually the words "cruel and inhumane" come to mind. Some of the adult mares can never be completely rehabilitated.

For the record, the human female product "Premarin" is a product of these mares. The "ingredients" gathered after foals are born.

It takes a very experienced horseman to work with these mares. I have seen some of them first hand when a rescuer brought a semi load of them down from Canada to a rescue facility in Southern California, quite a few years back.

Seeing those mares and the foals they gave birth to (all in the interest of harvesting the placenta) was an awful experience for me.
Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from a pregnant mares urine - it is not sourced from the placenta

The placenta is ALWAYS collected up by whoever delivers the foal to check to see that ALL of it has been passed. If any is left inside the mare it can cause infection and/or Laminitis.

Last edited by Tnavas; 08-30-2014 at 04:39 PM.
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post #18 of 21 Old 08-31-2014, 02:12 AM
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I have known people over the internet who have rescued premarin mares and they've turned in to wonderful horses. In general, they were more pets though than riding horses. The foals they bore turned into fabulous riding horses because they were trained with that in mind from birth.

But these were already experienced horse people and had money to invest in training. Training is not cheap. I raised a foal from birth and got him 2 1/2 months saddle training and for what I paid I could have gone out and bought a really nice horse that was well trained and rode it immediately.

I guess what I'm saying is, what you have is not a beginner's project. It is something most average horsemen would probably not tackle. Not because it's not do-able, but because you are much better off buying a horse that has been trained right from beginning. And even if you train them right from the beginning, it can be YEARS before they are safe for a beginner.

The perfect horse for a beginner is a been there, done that, probably middle-aged to elderly horse. You could get an older (but safe) horse for probably $500 to free and actually enjoy riding and learning on them. I am afraid if you try to tackle middle aged horses with scant training you will get discouraged at best, or injured at worst.

What you could do, is get someone to ride and evaluate the supposedly trained horse. It could be with a little brush-up training that horse may be good-to-go. Then you could decide if you want to train the other one or get a nice, safe older horse to have fun and learn on (which would be wisest AND cheapest, imo.)
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post #19 of 21 Old 08-31-2014, 02:36 AM
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I agree. You have to take lessons and allow yourself plenty of time to learn the basics while building up your confidence. It takes time, but is well worth the effort.
You horse will also need training or the old " green + green......" Adage will quickly prove true.

Personally, I would take lessons and seek a horse that suits you better.

My best to you.
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post #20 of 21 Old 09-02-2014, 02:19 AM
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your are right in thinking they are too much for you. You should be having fun with your first horse. I know you get attatched, but a untrained horse is very dangerous. you might not want to hear this, but you need a nice trail horse , that is totally trained for your first horse. maybe you could trade the two for a older well trained horse to have fun on
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