Needing a trim or something more worrying? Help please! - The Horse Forum
 11Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 14 Old 08-30-2014, 08:38 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 89
• Horses: 2
Needing a trim or something more worrying? Help please!

Hi Guys

I have just been to look a standard shetland pony for my children.
He is adorable is everyway and the perfect little gent for my children to learn on, but I have one concern with his feet.
He walks fine and shows no sign of lameness, but his hoofs seem to turn at the bottom.
I dont want to go ahead and buy him if its something more sinister than being in desperate need of a trim.
He is due to have the farrier visit in 5 days, so I know he needs a trim, but surely the ponies hooves shouldnt look like this if they have had him trimmed every 6-8 wks. He is barefoot.
I have added a picture where it can quite clearly be seen on his fronts.

Any advice would be gratefully received, thanks in advance.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg rolo2.jpg (26.0 KB, 249 views)
daisy1981 is offline  
post #2 of 14 Old 08-30-2014, 11:23 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Southern Indiana
Posts: 8,489
• Horses: 12
He's probably foundered, a farrier or vet could tell you for sure.
Chasin Ponies likes this.
JCnGrace is offline  
post #3 of 14 Old 08-30-2014, 11:36 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,717
• Horses: 0
Yes, possibly foundered (or laminitis episode, if you prefer) or his feet were neglected at some point in the past and they are still are a work in progress. If he was foundered, he could well be sound enough for your children to use with the codicil that his diet must be watched closely to keep his weight under control (over weight being the likely cause of founder in the first place, if it happened). If it was neglected feet, then it's a case of letting the process continue to return the feet to proper shape. It's hard to tell from the picture but I would speculate he can move around just fine.

So, under these circumstances, it would probably be a good idea to do a pre purchase exam or at the very least speak with the vet who treated him (if that's possible) if the owners acknowledge he foundered in the past.

Best of luck with it and I hope it works out for you as he's a smart looking little chap.
Chasin Ponies likes this.
Chevaux is offline  
post #4 of 14 Old 08-30-2014, 06:04 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 89
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chevaux View Post
Yes, possibly foundered (or laminitis episode, if you prefer) or his feet were neglected at some point in the past and they are still are a work in progress. If he was foundered, he could well be sound enough for your children to use with the codicil that his diet must be watched closely to keep his weight under control (over weight being the likely cause of founder in the first place, if it happened). If it was neglected feet, then it's a case of letting the process continue to return the feet to proper shape. It's hard to tell from the picture but I would speculate he can move around just fine.

So, under these circumstances, it would probably be a good idea to do a pre purchase exam or at the very least speak with the vet who treated him (if that's possible) if the owners acknowledge he foundered in the past.

Best of luck with it and I hope it works out for you as he's a smart looking little chap.
My daughter only rode him in walk today nut he seemed fine. I know the reason the lady is selling him is down to vet bills, and on questioning she said he is well overdue his trim. He is such a lovely boy, and i think he would be great for the kids.
I have asked her that the farrier sees him first, if he has no worries, then we will buy him. He is such a pretty boy, but it needs to be right.
Thanks for your responses x
Chevaux and Chasin Ponies like this.
daisy1981 is offline  
post #5 of 14 Old 08-31-2014, 11:11 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 19,994
• Horses: 0
Don't know what happened to my earlier reply to this! Can't really tell much at all from that pic, but from that impression only, his feet don't look too bad to me. His fores do appear to be quite flared, but hinds look good & heels seem low all round. Tho can't tell whether heels are long but crushed fwd from that.

Obviously more info required & PPE would be a good move, but I wouldn't at all rule a horse out based on that pic. If you'd like to post some hoof pics, there are a few of us here that know a thing or 2 & can give you more specific opinions.
Elana and Yogiwick like this.

Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
loosie is offline  
post #6 of 14 Old 08-31-2014, 11:25 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 47,166
• Horses: 2
maybe an xray on each front. to see if any rotation has occured.

there are ponies at our barn who have had episodes of laminitus, and some amount of founder (rotation of the bone), but not enough to make them unsound for walk/trot for children.

he's really cute.
Chasin Ponies likes this.
tinyliny is offline  
post #7 of 14 Old 09-05-2014, 03:50 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,287
• Horses: 2
Back "in the old days" when I dealt with ponies a lot I remember being shocked at how many were allowed to founder every single Spring on too much fresh grass and yet recovered from it almost completely year after year. You'd see the rings around the hooves and some grew out more distorted than others but they'd stay sound. Do that to a horse and he'd be dead the first time around!

Although he is showing some signs of founder in the past , (the "pixie shoe" look; turned up at the toe with a concave hoof) I really don't see a huge problem in these hooves, unless he is lame. If he were a full size horse I'd be nervous about it but not so much on a pony.
Chasin Ponies is offline  
post #8 of 14 Old 09-09-2014, 09:44 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,047
• Horses: 0
I remember my farrier stating once that there are two kinds of ponies. Those that have foundered and those that will founder. I always thought if I got a pony foal it would be interesting to see if I could keep him and grow him and never have a founder episode..... Ever.

Yes. He has likely foundered. Have a Pre Purchase exam by a vet. You may love him for your kids but if all he can do is walk around and cost you in vet bills he may not be what you want.

There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man. ~Winston Churchill
(or woman!!!! ) Dinosaur Horse Trainer
Elana is offline  
post #9 of 14 Old 09-09-2014, 11:07 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: west coast
Posts: 1,480
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana View Post
I remember my farrier stating once that there are two kinds of ponies. Those that have foundered and those that will founder. I always thought if I got a pony foal it would be interesting to see if I could keep him and grow him and never have a founder episode..... Ever.

Yes. He has likely foundered. Have a Pre Purchase exam by a vet. You may love him for your kids but if all he can do is walk around and cost you in vet bills he may not be what you want.
not to hijack the OP, but I find this interesting. Wonder if there's any truth to it? I have an older pony mare (never did know her age but I have owned her 11+ years and she was a broodie before), and she hasn't foundered once. She's on pasture all day every day and never had an issue. Hmm.
beverleyy is offline  
post #10 of 14 Old 09-11-2014, 03:44 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,287
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana View Post
I remember my farrier stating once that there are two kinds of ponies. Those that have foundered and those that will founder. I always thought if I got a pony foal it would be interesting to see if I could keep him and grow him and never have a founder episode..... Ever.

Yes. He has likely foundered. Have a Pre Purchase exam by a vet. You may love him for your kids but if all he can do is walk around and cost you in vet bills he may not be what you want.

And....just a note. You will be shocked by how quickly your children outgrown him. They are great for little kids to fool around with and take their knocks & falls with but children grow up incredibly fast and healthy ponies live a very, very long time. Fortunately they don't eat much either , compared to a horse.
Take it from a mom who has 'been there, done that'.!
loosie likes this.
Chasin Ponies is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is the difference between a barefoot trim & a farrier trim? flytobecat Horse Health 20 10-12-2013 05:04 PM
Natural barefoot trim vs. Reg bareft trim?? free_sprtd Horse Health 9 12-28-2012 05:35 PM
new horse, worrying like a new momma!!!! Shadow157 Horse Health 3 03-31-2009 11:50 AM
Feet not needing a trim lovemyponies Horse Health 12 12-15-2008 08:05 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome