New to horse fencing, ideas/types of fencing?? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 24 Old 05-15-2015, 07:24 PM Thread Starter
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New to horse fencing, ideas/types of fencing??

Hey all,

Just needing to re-fence the paddocks and wondering what material people use and why? Do you concrete the posts in or just dig deep holes?

Previous owners of the property have timber rail but all the posts/rails have rotted over the years and structurally have lost their strength.

Wanting something low maintenance, nice enough to look at. Willing to spend the $$ for good fencing but not wanting it to cost a fortune.
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post #2 of 24 Old 05-15-2015, 08:50 PM
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I'm a big fan of electric fencing.

Timber fences are great - and pricey. I don't know the specifics as I am mainly experienced with wire fencing. What ever you choose, designing them so you can offset with an electric wire is a great idea.
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post #3 of 24 Old 05-16-2015, 09:43 PM
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Diamond mesh fencing is very safe for horses and is easy to keep up. Put a solid fence board at the top and you can always add electric if you need it.

They cannot get their feet caught and if put in properly, they can't take off the one board at the top so, you don't have to spend time fixing fence boards.

If I could redo all my paddocks (three rail boards), I would use diamond mesh.
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post #4 of 24 Old 05-16-2015, 09:44 PM
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And you can always add electric to the top rather easily, if a horse is getting pushy with the fencing.
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post #5 of 24 Old 05-16-2015, 09:46 PM
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Not sure what diamond mesh is but I like the horse fence that are small rectangles and board at top. Post go about 4' in the ground every 8'. Staple fence at every wire.
I would never have high tensile or electric.
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post #6 of 24 Old 05-17-2015, 08:00 AM
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At our barn, we have no-climb (similar to diamond mesh), with a single board at the top, and a strand of electric. The posts are driven directly into the ground (no cement).

I've been at boarding stables with many different types of fencing, including PVC, polyethylene tape, electric tape, electric rope, three rail, and no climb. No climb has been, by far, the best fencing, in my experience. The horses can't get their legs through it. Miniatures and foals can't climb through it. And it's very low maintenance.

Wood rail fencing constantly needs repainted, or boards need replaced. Smaller horses may also climb through the rails if they're spaced too far, or if one breaks.

The polyethylene tape is pretty, and relatively low maintenance because it doesn't need to be painted. However, it gives and is not electrified, so smaller horses climb through the bottom. It also cracks and falls apart with age.

PVC may be lower maintenance than wood, but it is relatively fragile, especially as it ages, and when it breaks, it breaks into sharp pieces.

I like electric rope and tape. They are effective, so long as the electricity is working. I've been at some stables where one or two strands lose their juice and a horse gets wise to it and climbs out. Most horses will respect them though, on or off.

It's a good idea, no matter what kind of fencing you have, to run one strand of electric along the top. This will keep horses from leaning on the fence, and keep cribbers from cribbing on it. This will extend the life of your fence. It will also keep horses in neighboring paddocks from fighting over the fence.

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post #7 of 24 Old 05-18-2015, 09:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Louise01 View Post
Do you concrete the posts in or just dig deep holes?

Previous owners of the property have timber rail but all the posts/rails have rotted over the years and structurally have lost their strength.
We use treated utility poles for corners and bracing. They are placed around 4ft deep and soil is added back a few inches at a time and tamped firmly until the entire hole is filled and packed. We have posts that have been in place for 100years that were put in by DHs great grandfather. He used heart pine poles, placed the widest end at the bottom or better left short knubs where branches were (so the angle faces up) and buried the base to a depth of 4 feet using the same tamping technique to pack. The poles have no shift or move to them. No cement necessary.
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post #8 of 24 Old 05-18-2015, 01:01 PM
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A lot of different fence. I use all treated wood. I like my post in cement, but I do not have a freeze problem. I do have some that are not in cement, but make sure you put them deep and pack the dirt in. I understand the no climb wire is good. I like my wood but I will have maintenace on it.(even treated). With some horses you need a hot wire on the top. Search this forum, a lot of good ideas and pictures. Part will depend on available materials in your area. Good luck!
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post #9 of 24 Old 05-18-2015, 02:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque View Post
I would never have high tensile.
My brother-in-law uses high tensile fencing for his cattle, many strands, smooth wire, very close together. I always assumed if a horse hit it, it would work like a cheese slicer. My niece adopted a mustang, and when she thought it was calmed down enough she let it out into a slightly larger area. At some point the horse ran head on into that fence. Instead of getting sliced up, he was thrown backward so hard that he went over backwards and smacked his head on the bare frozen ground. No one was around, but it appeared the horse died instantly.

Whatever kind of fence you use, it's important that horses can see it.
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post #10 of 24 Old 05-18-2015, 03:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel Reiter View Post
My brother-in-law uses high tensile fencing for his cattle, many strands, smooth wire, very close together. I always assumed if a horse hit it, it would work like a cheese slicer. My niece adopted a mustang, and when she thought it was calmed down enough she let it out into a slightly larger area. At some point the horse ran head on into that fence. Instead of getting sliced up, he was thrown backward so hard that he went over backwards and smacked his head on the bare frozen ground. No one was around, but it appeared the horse died instantly.

Whatever kind of fence you use, it's important that horses can see it.
I agree with this.

When I worked for our local equine vet, we had a patient that got a leg caught in a high tensile wire fence. She degloved one of her front legs, aka stripped the flesh off her leg down to the bone. We all fought hard to save this horse, but she had to be put down due to her injury.

I would never house a horse in high tensile wire, barbed wire, electric wire, or any other type of wire. Just keep in mind that electric rope or tape is different, because it's more visible, and is unlikely to cut the horse if the horse runs into it, or gets a leg through it.

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