New horse- trying to add condition but is he getting hot? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 20 Old 06-09-2016, 12:06 PM
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Your TB sounds more like the 'rule' than the 'exception' OP
I've had a lot of TB's and they were all solid in traffic and could never have been described as spooky types or even particularly excitable but when fed on any sort of high sugar/high starch food and when 'fit' they were very much horses that liked to 'go', very high energy and prone to using silly little things as an excuse to lose self control if they got a bit 'wired'
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post #12 of 20 Old 06-09-2016, 02:06 PM
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Your winter is our summer in the USA....

So, not knowing exactly what you are feeding but feeding where you are is no different than feeding here...
To have a horse gain weight you need to feed in more calories than the horse is using in a day doing activities you demand of him.

Feeding to gain weight you look for a feed that is high in fat and fiber content, not ridiculous high in protein either...12% is more than adequate protein for now.
Take away the foods that add a quick sugar rush to the system if possible.
Feeding a nice mix of hay, in ample supply can add more weight than many hard feeds actually.

I'm making a guesstimate the horse is over 15 hands and built pretty solid...to me that is a minimum of 6-8 slabs/flakes of hay a day...actually supposed to be fed by weight.
So, if he is currently 800 pounds but should be weighing in at 1000 pounds you need to feed 1.5%-2% in hay so = 15 - 20 pounds a day in hay alone.
You feed based upon what the horse should weigh for them to gain or lose weight...NOT feed based on what they do weigh.
Now you add on your hard feed/grain in amounts that also are fed by weight not volume...
Gradually add those amounts or use a hay net/feeder of some sort so as the horse adjusts to more hay he not waste it either.

So, my other thought is....
You've known this horse for many years while he hung out in a pasture....
Now back to work you have had him attended to by a vet and farrier.
You added shoes to his feet for "comfort" reasons.
You injected his joints so that should of reduced his soreness making him a happy boy!!
He is also snuggly warm now not burning calories staying warm.

Your horse should be more energetic.
He is being fed a increased amount of food, now has shoes on his tender soled feet I bet, and you took away his discomfort by doing joint injections...

I would just go slow with the work added to him.
He was a pasture puff, now being required to work being ridden by your daughter.
Your lunging him and he is flying around....
Weather issues stink, but a more consistent workload put to him will also help to level off his energy level.
Be careful you not sore his muscles, pull his tendons or ligaments putting to many demands to quick at his pasture-puff status body.

And lastly....
Thoroughbreds are great horses to have.
They will give their all every-time you get astride or work on the ground with them.
They can be high energy, have spunk and spirit and be the most loving animal out there...
Do though handle them firmly and kindly with discipline. Use consistency and boundaries with them as you would any animal...
Don't take any guff but reward immediately with praise, scratches or a kind spoken word when they do something you asked for.
Sounds more to me like your horse is waking up, getting some personality back and enjoying the care he is now having...

Enjoy your horse...
...
jmo...


The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #13 of 20 Old 06-09-2016, 03:15 PM
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Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
Your TB sounds more like the 'rule' than the 'exception' OP
I've had a lot of TB's and they were all solid in traffic and could never have been described as spooky types or even particularly excitable but when fed on any sort of high sugar/high starch food and when 'fit' they were very much horses that liked to 'go', very high energy and prone to using silly little things as an excuse to lose self control if they got a bit 'wired'
Our guy is frazzled by NOTHING when he's in a calm state. NOTHING. But, when he's feeling a bit wired, he'll "spook" at the dumbest stuff. And I use quotation marks because he's not afraid. There are jump standards in the corner of the indoor at the barn where we keep him. Most days, he walks on past them like they're not there. When he's feeling frisky, though, those exact same jump standards have horse-eating monsters inside them. He's totally controllable, just prancy. This is usually due to a couple of days in a row w/ no work, or not enough turnout due to weather. I don't think it's diet related as he can go a couple of weeks w/out one of those days.
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post #14 of 20 Old 06-09-2016, 06:19 PM
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Our ISH who's mostly TB is bombproof on the roads, she's travelled a lot including by air and copes really well with all of that but she is a very forward going horse and when she's feeling like she's got energy to burn she'll blow up at the most silly things - like last night you could tell she was feeling too full of herself but held it all together until a killer squirrel jumped out in front of her and she just exploded!!! I was amazed that DH stuck on. Normally something like that wouldn't bother her at all.
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post #15 of 20 Old 06-09-2016, 06:59 PM
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I will say 1.5-2% forage is MAINTENANCE. For a hard keeper or a horse that needs weight you can never have too much. Minimum would be 3%.
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post #16 of 20 Old 06-09-2016, 09:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
I will say 1.5-2% forage is MAINTENANCE. For a hard keeper or a horse that needs weight you can never have too much. Minimum would be 3%.
Really Yogi?
If the horse weighs say 800 but you are feeding for proper weight of 1000 you think it still needs to be more hay?

Hmmmm....maybe that is why I still struggle to get the finishing touch on my rescue.
.. THANKS!!
...

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post #17 of 20 Old 06-09-2016, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Really Yogi?
If the horse weighs say 800 but you are feeding for proper weight of 1000 you think it still needs to be more hay?

Hmmmm....maybe that is why I still struggle to get the finishing touch on my rescue.
.. THANKS!!
...
You want to feel for ideal weight, yes, but the percentage depends on your needs.

I always feel it's 1.5-2%, 2.5 for a harder keeper and 1 as a diet. 3+ (or free choice) if you need more... and % of ideal weight again. Just my take on things.

Think about it 1% of 1000lb body weight is 10, 3% is 30! That's a HUGE difference. If you're feeding your 1000lb horse that is at ideal weight 1 vs 3 it will gain or lose, again the exact number depends on the individual horse and I don't feel you need to be that exact with hay.

Honestly if you're going for weight gain you can't overfeed hay so might as well right?
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post #18 of 20 Old 06-10-2016, 06:32 AM
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Thanks Yogi...
My guy is on pasture 12 hours a day now and then I feed him his hay when in the barn paddock area at night.
He never finishes it but I will try enticing him to eat more again.
He is older and just needs that finishing "rounding" to look great...a fight on my hands though getting him to that point.
I don't overfeed feed either as he doesn't work all that much not wanting other "issues" to develop.
....

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
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post #19 of 20 Old 06-10-2016, 09:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Thanks Yogi...
My guy is on pasture 12 hours a day now and then I feed him his hay when in the barn paddock area at night.
He never finishes it but I will try enticing him to eat more again.
He is older and just needs that finishing "rounding" to look great...a fight on my hands though getting him to that point.
I don't overfeed feed either as he doesn't work all that much not wanting other "issues" to develop.
....
Maybe a topic for a different thread?

My thoughts if his teeth are good and he's not finishing hay, are better quality different hay (maybe some alfalfa?), or pellets, and also sounds like a good candidate for beet pulp.
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post #20 of 20 Old 06-10-2016, 10:32 PM
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Originally Posted by ShirtHotTeez View Post
If I was fattening a horse I would probably use barley (as well as the hay) as it won’t make them hot, but it does need cooking. I would mix it with chaff and bran, further than that I need to brush up on my horse nutrition as there has been a lot of advances in the past few years.

He is a thoroughbred. They can be very calm and well-mannered right up until they are not. They are not bred to be placid schoolmaster types, it is just that they are versatile enough to be. IMO they are not suitable for beginners or nervous riders, and yes I know some people here will shout me down on that, and some riding schools use them…yadda yadda.
I have to disagree with this. Barley is an actual grain, like corn and has a high NSC content of 57%. Corn and Barley are not digested in the large intestine, and can cause ulcers if too much is fed.

Having known many Thoroughbreds, yes there are a few that are actually not hot whatsoever, can babysit little kids, never get worked up at all. I have ridden Thoroughbreds that you could not get to move out if you lit a firecracker under their tail. I have to disagree with the bias that all TBs have an innate reactive or hot side. Some are more calm than the calmest QH. Some of these even have come off the track, but typically were only started one time and cantered around behind the rest of the field before flunking out of racing.

You have known this horse for six years...the past three the horse was not in work. Have you ever known the horse when he was at a good weight, had good hoof care, and was not in pain? I've known some horses that were rather dull until getting very healthy, and then they became more energetic. BUT you have to realize if this happens that it is not about what you are doing wrong, but what you are doing RIGHT. If this is the case, it's great for the horse even if he needs to go to a home with someone who can deal with that energy level.
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