New Issue: Gelding Panics When Tied - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 63 Old 01-04-2016, 11:48 PM Thread Starter
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Oh! Before I forget, the saddle so far seems to be fitting properly, no saddle sores. Yesterday was the first time I put a saddle on him while being tied, so in the past with me, him doing that wasn't about the saddle.
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post #22 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 02:09 AM
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I've seen too many horses injured from hard tying. It cures the pulling back problem, but how do you know the horse won't have permanent damage to his neck, facial nerves, etc? There's also a risk of disfiguring the horse's face, even if you don't cause chronic pain. One of my mares had her nasal bone damaged by someone hard tying her, and now it is deformed and she has a white scar on her nose. I was told they regretted trying it because they had to call the vet...she injured her hind leg too.
You can see the divot in this pic, just above the power line in the photo:

I've never seen her pull back in 6 years, but I started tying her with a tie blocker ring and then began tying her with a regular lead line and safety knot when I knew she was safe.

I don't believe horses should be left alone when tied because they can't get away if something truly bad happens. My preference is also the tie blocker ring. Just use it for awhile, and then the horse will get over his claustrophobia about being trapped while tied, and stop pulling back. Soon you can tie regularly again. It shouldn't matter if the horse ever should get out of the tie blocker, because hopefully you don't leave him unattended in an unsafe place. I know people do, but it is not an ideal practice.

The horse has a reason that is logical to himself and doesn't have to do with game playing or other ideas humans come up with to explain horse behavior that is actually anthropomorphizing. If a horse pulls back because he knows he can get away, you just have to block the behavior safely until he gets over the habit. Make the tie blocker have a little more resistance. He's just choosing food/friends/rest over standing somewhere and either getting ridden, hungry or bored.
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post #23 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 03:23 AM Thread Starter
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Yeah I definitely don't like the idea of leaving him unsupervised. I was actually worried he hurt h is neck yesterday but he seems to be okay. It's quite awful to watch. :/
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post #24 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 11:59 AM
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I know I'm in the minority here but I would be hesitant to tie the horse and let him figure things out. Seems really dangerous!

I can't believe that simply leaving the horse to pull back wouldn't hurt it in some way, head or neck... If for some reason the rope didn't give out couldn't the horse potentially break it's neck? I know it's a common way to teach younger ones to stand quietly tied but a horse who is supposedly trained for this and has suddenly started doing it may have something else going on and I wouldn't just jump to that.

My old mare was very sensitive and would pull back and panic while being girthed, had to go a hole at a time and wait a moment in between or she'd back up so fast. I generally just looped her lead over the post and didn't tie it at all because she could be unpredictable and I wasn't ever away from her while she was tied. Eventually she learned that she wasn't trapped and she stopped pulling back at all.

We also had a heavy duty rubber inner tube attached to one of our posts and tied the lead onto that. It had some give and stretch and horses usually came back to it since they couldn't just lean back forever on it. It broke once I believe, but better that than a halter/lead or hurting the horse.
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post #25 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Werecat View Post
Yeah I definitely don't like the idea of leaving him unsupervised. I was actually worried he hurt h is neck yesterday but he seems to be okay. It's quite awful to watch. :/
Even if you're right there & he flips out & over there won't be a thing you can do about it.
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post #26 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 01:23 PM
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The thing about it, is that I don't believe in giving horses the luxury of escaping the tie ring. Like my earlier post about how my string of horses stand, they don't get to get away of their own accord. When they start thinking and using their brain, they get a release of pressure - Which is them coming forward and standing quietly.

There are SO many people around here who use the blocker ring because their horse pulls back and let me tell you, I hate it. We go out to races here, I have four horses with me, park next to someone who uses them and when their horse does escape (Because they will, if they are mischievous enough) and suddenly you've got a loose horse next to my trailer, riling up my lot. Not to mention to two hundred other trailers out there, some with kids on ponies, arena drags lying around, open stalls and trailers, people in the middle of competing, and suddenly there's a loose horse on asphalt running a muck.

You will not always have the luxury of being able to supervise your horse when they pull away from that ring. And even if you do, there will come a time still when he pulls back and you are underneath him - Or you just aren't quick enough and he gets away from you.

I am sure plenty of people are going to jump in and disagree with me, but let me tell you it happens constantly - I can't seem to get through a show without somebody's equine removing themselves from the angelic tie ring. It is one of my biggest pet peeves as a producer and as an exhibitor. At the very worst case scenario, your horse pulls back, he only hurts himself - He pulls back and gets loose, he runs the risk of hurting someone else, maybe even a kid or another horse.

Anyway, in my experience as scary as pulling back is to most people - A good majority of the time the horses do not hurt themselves unless they are truly, truly idiots. Which in that case, I believe stupid should hurt. Of course that's just me.
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Pssh.I didn't pick up the wrong lead
It's called a counter canter...
...A very advanced maneuver.
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post #27 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SorrelHorse View Post
The thing about it, is that I don't believe in giving horses the luxury of escaping the tie ring. Like my earlier post about how my string of horses stand, they don't get to get away of their own accord. When they start thinking and using their brain, they get a release of pressure - Which is them coming forward and standing quietly.

There are SO many people around here who use the blocker ring because their horse pulls back and let me tell you, I hate it. We go out to races here, I have four horses with me, park next to someone who uses them and when their horse does escape (Because they will, if they are mischievous enough) and suddenly you've got a loose horse next to my trailer, riling up my lot. Not to mention to two hundred other trailers out there, some with kids on ponies, arena drags lying around, open stalls and trailers, people in the middle of competing, and suddenly there's a loose horse on asphalt running a muck.

You will not always have the luxury of being able to supervise your horse when they pull away from that ring. And even if you do, there will come a time still when he pulls back and you are underneath him - Or you just aren't quick enough and he gets away from you.

I am sure plenty of people are going to jump in and disagree with me, but let me tell you it happens constantly - I can't seem to get through a show without somebody's equine removing themselves from the angelic tie ring. It is one of my biggest pet peeves as a producer and as an exhibitor. At the very worst case scenario, your horse pulls back, he only hurts himself - He pulls back and gets loose, he runs the risk of hurting someone else, maybe even a kid or another horse.

Anyway, in my experience as scary as pulling back is to most people - A good majority of the time the horses do not hurt themselves unless they are truly, truly idiots. Which in that case, I believe stupid should hurt. Of course that's just me.
Your third sentence describes how the tie ring works without causing injury.
Once they stop pulling after the most amount of 'hold' adjusted on the ring they can then be hard tied without trying to pull back. It's taught in increments.
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post #28 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 01:57 PM
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Altho it takes some effort and a little more time on my part, I prefer to teach the horse to be patient while at liberty. Horses that know they can escape that unseen predator, will often stand quietly. Knowing this I put it to good use. My horses stand with a hand signal, no need to tie them. I can walk away to fetch something else and they'll still be waiting.



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post #29 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 02:25 PM
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I have had several horses that pulled back in my lifetime. I have had 100% success using the rubber inner tube. It has enough give so the horse doesn't get injured, but they don't get loose either. Until the horse learns to stand tied (which they all eventually do), I take the inner tube along with me.
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post #30 of 63 Old 01-05-2016, 03:12 PM
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I had this problem a good few months ago with my gelding. He learnt to lean and snap lead ropes. I figured the reason he was doing so was because he wanted to move - so I made him do just that. It took about 3 goes of him leaning and snapping and me then immediately having him trot or canter around me for a couple of minutes or two before he stopped and learnt that moving meant moving. He hasn't done it since.
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