New Issue: Gelding Panics When Tied - Page 6 - The Horse Forum
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post #51 of 63 Old 01-08-2016, 08:46 PM
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If a horse can't be left alone, tied, he has a huge hole in training.
Obviously, you never trail ride, tie a horse over night, while you sleep in a tent!
A horse should not be left alone, in cross ties, but a horse sure as heck should be taught to accept being tied solid, alone. That is a big part of my training program, and many other trainers that have a credible training program
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post #52 of 63 Old 01-08-2016, 10:47 PM
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To me there is a difference between leaving a horse unattended and leaving a horse tied while you are within the vicinity. I leave my horses tied when I'm in the area, but I always make sure someone is in range where they could hear if the horse was in trouble. I do camp with horses, but my persuasion is to use a pen. It's pretty easy to throw up one of those temporary electrical pens and it seems more comfortable for the horses. Some places we go also have corrals since they're set up for horse camping. I don't consider leaving a horse tied while you're in a tent close by as leaving the horse alone, because you can hear if the horse is in trouble. We'll hear horses pawing the ground or rolling, etc.

I wouldn't leave a horse completely alone tied. Both of my horses have a known history of pulling back (the one mare I pictured did it before I owned her, my other mare did it once early in her training), but through retraining they can be safely tied. But I don't tie in halters that are completely unbreakable with no metal parts, and I always use a safety knot. That's because I believe any horse, no matter how solidly trained can pull back in the right circumstances.

I'm not saying it's morally wrong to leave a horse alone while tied and unable to escape, but I personally wouldn't do it. Where we live there are predators such as bear and mountain lions, and coyotes. I know first hand how quickly horses can get themselves into trouble as well.
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post #53 of 63 Old 01-09-2016, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
If a horse can't be left alone, tied, he has a huge hole in training.
Obviously, you never trail ride, tie a horse over night, while you sleep in a tent!
A horse should not be left alone, in cross ties, but a horse sure as heck should be taught to accept being tied solid, alone. That is a big part of my training program, and many other trainers that have a credible training program
I agree completely that it is a hole in the training and that it needs to be corrected. In my experience I have worked on the problem but never let the fact that the horse had a tying issue keep me from working on other aspects of training. Just my opinion, but I would rather start a riding session off by not having a traumatic issue before hand. The OP is accomplishing something if her method of slipping the lead through the ring and not tying it is working for now. She is teaching the horse to accept standing still at that seems to be working. The "hole" in the training in this case is different from a horse that was never taught something to begin with (although not learning to yield to pressure is part of it), it is also about having learned a bad habit that needs to be undone. I am not disputing professional opinions but the OP is not a trainer but an owner with one horse and needs to work on this issue in a way that she is both comfortable and confident with.
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post #54 of 63 Old 01-09-2016, 05:50 PM
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To me there is a difference between leaving a horse unattended and leaving a horse tied while you are within the vicinity. I leave my horses tied when I'm in the area, but I always make sure someone is in range where they could hear if the horse was in trouble. I do camp with horses, but my persuasion is to use a pen. It's pretty easy to throw up one of those temporary electrical pens and it seems more comfortable for the horses. Some places we go also have corrals since they're set up for horse camping. I don't consider leaving a horse tied while you're in a tent close by as leaving the horse alone, because you can hear if the horse is in trouble. We'll hear horses pawing the ground or rolling, etc.

I wouldn't leave a horse completely alone tied. Both of my horses have a known history of pulling back (the one mare I pictured did it before I owned her, my other mare did it once early in her training), but through retraining they can be safely tied. But I don't tie in halters that are completely unbreakable with no metal parts, and I always use a safety knot. That's because I believe any horse, no matter how solidly trained can pull back in the right circumstances.

I'm not saying it's morally wrong to leave a horse alone while tied and unable to escape, but I personally wouldn't do it. Where we live there are predators such as bear and mountain lions, and coyotes. I know first hand how quickly horses can get themselves into trouble as well.


Of course, we all do what works for us, and what we are comfortable with doing!
Far as a confirmed halter puller, I go for the cure.
Even if you are close, a horse can still get in a wreak, if his reaction to set back, and once a horse learns he can break free, he is more likely to do so.
There are some places where there are tie stalls, far as equestrian staging areas, but we also pack in to remote wilderness, and are not about to try and pack in panels!
I also go on hunting trips with hubby in the fall, where we at times tie up our horses, some distance from camp, go on on foot, and return after dark
When I started horses under saddle, after they were worked, they got tied up, alone in the barn, as part of the entire program
I rode other horses in between, or did household chores. Even now, every once in awhile, after I ride and horse and return home, they get to stand tied up , by themselves, for an hour or so



Some camp sites do have hitching rails, and our tent is not that far away, that I won't check on the horses, if something wakes me in the night, but I'm sure not going to sweat all night, lay awake, thinking that they might pull back and have a wreak. If they were to panic, at every slight noise! I would be darn sure there was a good reason,if they really started to panic, and send hubby out with a gun to check on things!


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post #55 of 63 Old 01-16-2016, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
If a horse can't be left alone, tied, he has a huge hole in training.
Obviously, you never trail ride, tie a horse over night, while you sleep in a tent!
A horse should not be left alone, in cross ties, but a horse sure as heck should be taught to accept being tied solid, alone. That is a big part of my training program, and many other trainers that have a credible training program
This! I frequently take Trouble to relatives and friends houses and leave him tied to a tree while I go in for a coffee and a chat. I couldn't imagine not being able to tie him out there. It'd be horribly inconvenient. Patience is something I teach from day one. Pawing, pacing and pulling back is a huge no for me. I can't stand pawing especially. I don't mind alertness, but he better settle down eventually or were having a good work out session, his rest periods will be when he's tied.
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post #56 of 63 Old 01-17-2016, 05:23 AM Thread Starter
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I don't mind alertness, but he better settle down eventually or were having a good work out session, his rest periods will be when he's tied.
Oddly enough this is what I've been doing. I tie him, when he gets antsy, impatient, I'll work him for a while, then bring him back in and he's usually fine. But the same the next day with the impatience/alert/nervous. I haven't hard tied him yet, just the lead rope through the ring.
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post #57 of 63 Old 01-17-2016, 09:27 AM
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Oddly enough this is what I've been doing. I tie him, when he gets antsy, impatient, I'll work him for a while, then bring him back in and he's usually fine. But the same the next day with the impatience/alert/nervous. I haven't hard tied him yet, just the lead rope through the ring.
See Troubles also fought the rope until he couldn't anymore. Fought to the point of laying on the ground sweating. Eventually he gave up and let out a huge sigh and that's when he was let off. He finally got it that he wasn't going to win against this post.
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post #58 of 63 Old 01-19-2016, 09:42 PM
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There are SO many people around here who use the blocker ring because their horse pulls back and let me tell you, I hate it. We go out to races here, park next to someone who uses them and when their horse does escape (Because they will, if they are mischievous enough) and suddenly you've got a loose horse next to my trailer, riling up my lot. I can't seem to get through a show without somebody's equine removing themselves from the angelic tie ring.
The Blocker tie ring is just a tool, it isn't magic. There are multiple ways to spool the rope, with increasing levels of resistance, and the resistance also varies according to the diameter and texture of the lead rope.

In my case, I stupidly tied my big guy to the round pen one day. When something startled him, he moved back and round pen came with him. He got pretty excited but I was right there and stopped it before it was a wreck. After that he was very nervous any time he was tied. I bought a ring and used it according to the directions, deliberately spooking him backwards so he could see that he wasn't trapped.

I leave my horses tied for hours at a time and never in the ten years I've used Blocker rings has either one of them gotten loose. If I was using a ring in a public place and leaving my horses, I would make sure the resistance was high. Using a rope halter, I don't think very many horses would have the determination to fight all the way to the end of a 14' lead rope.

I guess what I'm saying is you could ban Blocker Tie Rings from big events, but negligent and incompetent owners would still find a way to ruin everybody's life. I think it's a useful tool and I recommend it.
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post #59 of 63 Old 01-20-2016, 04:31 PM
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Honestly, I'm not for the whipping him across the butt or anything, maybe a few hard slaps on the rump. I would teach him to respond to pressure, but in the meantime you can tie him in between two trees, so it's kinda like cross ties, and basically forget about him for a couple hours. Also, if he ever pulls back while being tied normally you can tie him up a special way so that you just pull on the end of the rope and it unties immediately, but the horse can't pull back and untie it. But, beware, a smart horse will learn how to pull that rope and untie himself.
The problem with the 2 tree tying is if the horse turns around it then has ropes across it's face every kind of wrong way. Good way to injure an eye, ear or whatever.

I've used a body rope on a confirmed puller who already had white hairs right where the rope went. He didn't move so I know he had had that treatment in the past. So when he had a body rope on he didn't pull but when it was off it was 'game on' in his mind.
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post #60 of 63 Old 01-20-2016, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Joel Reiter View Post
The Blocker tie ring is just a tool, it isn't magic. There are multiple ways to spool the rope, with increasing levels of resistance, and the resistance also varies according to the diameter and texture of the lead rope.

In my case, I stupidly tied my big guy to the round pen one day. When something startled him, he moved back and round pen came with him. He got pretty excited but I was right there and stopped it before it was a wreck. After that he was very nervous any time he was tied. I bought a ring and used it according to the directions, deliberately spooking him backwards so he could see that he wasn't trapped.

I leave my horses tied for hours at a time and never in the ten years I've used Blocker rings has either one of them gotten loose. If I was using a ring in a public place and leaving my horses, I would make sure the resistance was high. Using a rope halter, I don't think very many horses would have the determination to fight all the way to the end of a 14' lead rope.

I guess what I'm saying is you could ban Blocker Tie Rings from big events, but negligent and incompetent owners would still find a way to ruin everybody's life. I think it's a useful tool and I recommend it.
I had a stinker pull about 30 feet of rope through the ring until he stopped. Luckily the rope was 40 feet. That was the initial pull on the loosest setting. That horse was one of the worst pullers I had ever seen. He now hard ties perfectly after going through the training steps.
Every horse that comes here for training goes on a Blocker ring as a tying assessment no matter how well the owner says it ties.
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