New land owner - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 02-02-2016, 08:11 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: gloucestershire
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New land owner

Hello everyone,

Brand new on here and hoping to get helpful, friendly advice and pointers.....

I have 20 acres of land and would like to offer it for grazing/livery and would like to know what horse owners would like/need.

I have mains water already in place and electricity due soon - but would welcome any advice to help me on my way.

Also what is the normal charge per week?

All the best
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post #2 of 8 Old 02-02-2016, 09:26 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
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Am I right in assuming that you woukd prefer not to get involved with the daily work yourself? If that is right, then (as far as horses go) your best option is probably to pasture board horses with self-care by the owner.

For the basics, you'd need:
-safe fencing (barbed wire is not really safe for horses)
- a shelter
- water (either a trough or auto waterer, peferrably with an option to keep it ice-free in the winter)
- storage space for hay (a shed to stack bales on pallets would be awesome, but I know some people just tarp round bales)
- a small storage room for other stuff (tack, halters, blankets etc) would be a plus
- maybe a spot to park/store a trailer
You might also want to look into things like paature management, weed control and such.

The owners would be responsible for everything - feeding, farrier, vet, etc. Make sure you'd have a solid contract un place that covers stuff like what happens if the owner doesn't provide basic care, stops paying or abandons the horse at your place.
How much you can charge depends very much on the location. Here in Alberta (outside of Calgary), it would probably be in the ball park of $100 - $150 per horse per month. How many horses you can put on 20 acres also depends very much on the layout of the land and the forage. Too many horses could cauae problems with overgrazing and manure.
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post #3 of 8 Old 02-02-2016, 11:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regula View Post
Am I right in assuming that you woukd prefer not to get involved with the daily work yourself? If that is right, then (as far as horses go) your best option is probably to pasture board horses with self-care by the owner.

For the basics, you'd need:
-safe fencing (barbed wire is not really safe for horses)
- a shelter
- water (either a trough or auto waterer, peferrably with an option to keep it ice-free in the winter)
- storage space for hay (a shed to stack bales on pallets would be awesome, but I know some people just tarp round bales)
- a small storage room for other stuff (tack, halters, blankets etc) would be a plus
- maybe a spot to park/store a trailer
You might also want to look into things like paature management, weed control and such.

The owners would be responsible for everything - feeding, farrier, vet, etc. Make sure you'd have a solid contract un place that covers stuff like what happens if the owner doesn't provide basic care, stops paying or abandons the horse at your place.
How much you can charge depends very much on the location. Here in Alberta (outside of Calgary), it would probably be in the ball park of $100 - $150 per horse per month. How many horses you can put on 20 acres also depends very much on the layout of the land and the forage. Too many horses could cauae problems with overgrazing and manure.
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How does self care pasture board work in winter, regarding feeding hay?
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post #4 of 8 Old 02-02-2016, 11:25 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Canada
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You could always lease the land out to horse people or cow people for their livestock. That way you still own it, but they are responsible for taking care of their own animals. You would likely be responsible for repairing any fences and general maintenance.

There is a 1/4 section behind my house that we do not own. The owner lives in a different province, but leases it out to a fellow to run his cows on. The actual owner makes some money by leasing the land out, but does not have anything to do with the care of the animals. And in most cases, if the fence requires repairing, the lessee will pay for it and get reimbursed by the owner.
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post #5 of 8 Old 02-02-2016, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by natisha View Post
How does self care pasture board work in winter, regarding feeding hay?
Depends on what the horse owner(s) want to do and how much the land owner wants to get involved.
Here, many pasture boarding places have the horses on free choice round bales in the winter. Sometimes the land owner buys the hay, takes care of moving in a new bale when the old one is finished, sometimes the horse owner(s) buy the hay and take care of feeding it themselves. If the land owner buys the hay, usually board goes up during the wintertime.
In principle, in self-care boarding, everyone is responsible for feeding and taking care of their own horse(s), but in some places with more than one horse owner, they take turns with the chores, e.g. one of them does all the morning feedings and one does all the evening feedings.
It really comes down to how much the land owner wants to get involved and how the horse owners self-organize.

It would definitely be a lot less work to lease out the land for cattle grazing, but 20 acres is probably not enough for that.
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post #6 of 8 Old 02-02-2016, 12:51 PM
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Generally UK people want somewhere that they can stable a horse and with all the wet we seem to get in the winter this is vital to save the land.

What you charge is dependant on the area you are in.

What sort of land do you have, is it flat, chalk or clay?

How well draining?

You need somewhere for storing hay and bedding, somewhere secure for tack.

The land needs to be divided into paddocks so grazing can be rotated.

More to it than meets the eye!
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post #7 of 8 Old 02-02-2016, 01:40 PM
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Join Date: May 2012
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Agree with Foxhunter.
A lot of my UK friends who keep horses at livery have been on restricted or zero turnout a lot this winter due to heavy rain so you need to provide either stabling a some sort of a corral area with shelter(s) so horses can be shut of the land if necessary
You'll have to decide who's going to be responsible for chores like poo picking, chain harrowing, general land management (especially if you divide into smaller paddocks) and weed control and whether or not you'll provide storage for feed, hay and bedding (last one if applicable) and tack and equipment and then who will be responsible for the security of those things if the property is easily accessed from the road
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post #8 of 8 Old 02-05-2016, 07:31 AM
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Bumping up to by pass spam
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