New Owner/Rider and a green horse - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 41 Old 11-20-2015, 10:21 AM
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For the OP's peace of mind, I don't think she should be thinking that this horse was a huge dumb mistake. A four year old was certainly not the most practical choice but the mare was calm and seemed well started. The OP may actually be a decent rider just doesn't have the experience to train or correct problems. She certainly has shown some "good thinking" by noticing that the mare will stand for grooming except for her back and may be somewhat herd bound by speeding up in the direction of other horses. She may very well decide to sell this horse but I think it is best for all involved to try to pin point and solve the problem first. Again, some good outside help will be needed
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post #22 of 41 Old 11-20-2015, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Textan49 View Post
For the OP's peace of mind, I don't think she should be thinking that this horse was a huge dumb mistake.
No one is saying it was a 'huge dumb mistake' but I do believe it was a mistake, we ALL make mistakes, not all of them are dumb, just like this one ill advised.

I worry less about the Op's current peace of mind, but more her long time peace of mind and health of body, not to mention the mares.

I belong to a 'fearful riders' group, and so many of those are people who had a wreck with the unsuitable horse that they ended up with. There is nothing wrong with deciding you have the wrong horse, and no we don't know the situation here.....but there is so much more to it than peace of mind

ďNever attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidityĒ
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post #23 of 41 Old 11-20-2015, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Saskia View Post
...Besides all the training needed and risk part of the reason such a young horse isn't suitable is that you don't really get a good experience of horse ownership. Your first horse should be fun and you should be able to jump on and go for trail rides and run through fields and learn to pop over logs and all those things you imagine riding to be. But with a horse like yours while ownership might be salvageable it will won't be as enjoyable, safe and fun as an appropriate horse would be....


I'm working on UN-learning some bad habits I picked up in self-defense. The first horse can be a little challenging, but it ultimately ought to be a horse who is safe & fun. Save the challenges for later. Or not at all, if you are starting at 50 like I did...

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #24 of 41 Old 11-20-2015, 04:26 PM
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I was 45 when my dad died and I inherited my big guy. He was a year old. I soon found out I didn't know as much about horses as I thought I did. I also found out I could no longer ride like I could when I was a kid, and that I had more fear than I did when I was a kid. My horse is now 18 and we can ride anywhere, but it was quite a journey.

If you can find a good trainer that would be a big help. What helped me more than anything was a local event called the Minnesota Horse Expo, where every year I've been able to see top trainers demonstrate their techniques. I found that Clinton Anderson's method worked for me and has been primarily responsible for getting us where we are.

If you buy on Black Friday you can get the Fundamentals kit for half price. Still expensive, but it will be a mouse pee in the ocean compared to what your trainer will charge you and it will be available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

While I advise people to buy a 20 year old gelding for their first horse, I don't think you are necessarily doomed. You just have an awful lot of learning to do.
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post #25 of 41 Old 11-21-2015, 05:43 PM
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I tried to reply earlier and then my internet service went out.

I'll recap here. I also bought two green horses earlier this summer as an intermediate beginner trail rider and first time owner. I wouldn't say it was the best choice, but in four months I have had good success and don't believe that green/green has to be a recipe for failure.

Here's what helped me: Watching hours of horse training videos online/reading just as many online articles, scouring this forum, and reading and implementing Clinton Anderson's book.

I cannot stress the importance of groundwork just for the relationship building aspect and to reinforce to your horse that you are in charge. Also, as others have said horses can sense an inexperience or timid rider. I am inexperienced, but I have been determined to ACT confident and I believe that has made a world of difference. I'm also very stubborn so when my horses and I have a disagreement I will make sure I get the last word (unless I feel I'm in a dangerous situation, but I try not to let that happen).

My mare started out being very disrespectful to me. She would turn her butt towards me when I approached, attempt to bite, and constantly pinned her ears. Now four months down the road she is almost sweet and has had a huge attitude adjustment. We're still working on a few things like crossing water willingly and letting me handle her rear hooves, but overall she's a very much improved horse.

My gelding figured out that he can intimidate my kids by trying to run them into a fence, so now I ride him. He tried running me into a fence twice and both times he received a nice pop in the belly and he hasn't done it since. He also tried to have a bucking/rearing fit a couple of weeks ago, but we had a nice little discussion as I turned him in circles and he got over it. This weekend we had a super groundwork session and when I took him out the next day he was almost angelic. Again, we have more work to do, but there is improvement and no one has gotten hurt. Nor do I intend to.

All this is to say that I think if a newbie is willing to put in the effort by educating themselves, working with the horse, asking for advice, and has a decent amount of determination and patience it can work.

Good luck and please keep us posted.
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post #26 of 41 Old 11-22-2015, 09:36 PM
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Smile

Hi there SavitasMom. As the last poster said, groundwork (and lots of it) sets the stage for a respectful relationship with your horse. From the time you put on the halter and snap on the lead rope in the paddock is when I expect my horse to be on my wishes (with my dual respect and fairness of course). From the paddock- walk, stop beside my when I stop, backup when I ask, etc. I do this every time. It sets the stage for a good ride. Read all you can get on John Lyons, Clinton Anderson, and others and utube for visual learning. And obtain a good instructor if you can. The good ones are worth their weight in gold.

Now I don't know how you feel about rehoming your current horse and buying a well trained horse with lots of miles, and I appreciate that is a very personal choice. With lots of time and work and good instruction you do have a chance of learning together, but it is a much harder road to follow. But if you feel constantly overwhelmed on your horse, give it a good thought. As John Lyons says "there is a horse for every rider and a rider for every horse". I wish you lots of luck, either way. Riding with a great partner awesome.
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post #27 of 41 Old 11-22-2015, 10:18 PM
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It wouldn't hurt to get some knowledgeable advice on what you are feeding her, so you can find out if she is lacking anything. Her 'sudden'(?) twitchiness could be diet-related (ie magnesium) but its not something to just guess at. Speak to someone in your area with experience and tell them everything your horse gets now.
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post #28 of 41 Old 11-22-2015, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Textan49 View Post
For the OP's peace of mind, I don't think she should be thinking that this horse was a huge dumb mistake. A four year old was certainly not the most practical choice but the mare was calm and seemed well started. The OP may actually be a decent rider just doesn't have the experience to train or correct problems. She certainly has shown some "good thinking" by noticing that the mare will stand for grooming except for her back and may be somewhat herd bound by speeding up in the direction of other horses. She may very well decide to sell this horse but I think it is best for all involved to try to pin point and solve the problem first. Again, some good outside help will be needed
I agree,while novice horse & rider combos often don't work out I have seen plenty that do.Easiest/safest is find a more schooled horse....but With help from a trainer teaching her horse handling as well as riding lessons, think she & horse have potential. It is up to OP, but if she believes in herself & horse to really work at it,know from my own experiences to know it can work.
I do believe this horse may actually have something physical bothering her,creating change in behavior,not necessarily the fact she is taking advantage of OP. Ulcers ,back/ribs out of align etc. should be considered before proceeding IMO

There are Horse Crazy People,then there is Crazy People with horses...Know the Difference !!
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post #29 of 41 Old 11-22-2015, 11:09 PM
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I started taking riding lessons and purchased my 1st horse after age 50 from my riding instructor who felt that we would be good together. Bad idea at the time and with the knowledge I have now, I would have never sold a newbie this horse.

I took riding lessons on this horse for over a month before I brought him home. I was still riding at the walk and hadn't learned to trot then. It didn't take me long to realize that both the horse and I was greener than grass. The horse went back for training for 60 days and I purchased me a 18 year old been there done that horse that would put up with me not knowing much.

During these 60 days, said horse got a lot of ground work but very little riding. I rode him a few times in the arena before I brought him home. After I got him home, a few days later, I saddled him up and got ready to go for a trail ride. It didn't take me long to hit the ground. It took months before I got back on him. This horse was so spooky that to him every day was Holloween.

I began watching a lot of you tube videos until I found a clinician that I could understand, Clinton Anderson. I ordered the book "Gaining Respect and Control on The Ground." I read it and re-read it again. Then I found the DVD series used at a good price and purchased it. I watched the dvds and studied his body movement as to how he used his energy to get the horse to understand what he wanted him to do. Once I started taking him through the exercises, balancing sensitizing with desensitizing, he became a much calmer willing horse. Yes I did the ground work, but because I was still learning to ride, I got a friend who also used CA's method to do the riding exercises. Now I compete sometimes on this horse. The better your ground work and timing is, the calmer your horse will be. The calmer your horse is, works on giving you more confidence handling your horse.

Find someone to help you, either a knowledgeable friend or trainer. Learn all that you can from them. Frustration ends where knowledge begins. It won't happen over night. It may even take weeks. Do what you have to do to become a confident leader for your horse. Once you start gaining knowledge, it will slowly chip away at the frustration and you'll become totally relaxed around your horse. But 1st get him checked to make sure he's not in pain.

You will never learn every thing. Even with my now 20 year old quarter horse, sometimes he still remind me that I still have much to learn.

"Don't let doubt, fear or the negativity of others stand in the way of your dreams and goals." - Clinton
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post #30 of 41 Old 11-23-2015, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Golden Horse View Post
No one is saying it was a 'huge dumb mistake' but I do believe it was a mistake, we ALL make mistakes, not all of them are dumb, just like this one ill advised.

I worry less about the Op's current peace of mind, but more her long time peace of mind and health of body, not to mention the mares.

I belong to a 'fearful riders' group, and so many of those are people who had a wreck with the unsuitable horse that they ended up with. There is nothing wrong with deciding you have the wrong horse, and no we don't know the situation here.....but there is so much more to it than peace of mind
I agree with Golden Horse. My post regarding OP not feeling like she is "stuck" and has to keep the horse was to help her feel OK if she is not "having fun" and being able to ride the horse as she anticipated. Training costs a lot. When you get an "inexpensive" horse and then have to get professional help, you have added not only $$$ to your investment, but time lost while you can't ride. If you enjoy the journey and time it takes to get to where you thought you would be when you first purchased the horse, then OK.

I have made some mistakes in purchases and waited FAR to long for things to "be right" before realizing I had pushed my goal and pleasure far away.

I wanted to offer another option, not tell OP what to do.
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